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Selected Works

Patricia A. McCoy

Banking and Finance Law

Predatory lending

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Rethinking Disclosure In A World Of Risk-Based Pricing, Patricia Mccoy Mar 2014

Rethinking Disclosure In A World Of Risk-Based Pricing, Patricia Mccoy

Patricia A. McCoy

In response to subprime loan abuses, it is common for policymakers to exhort consumers to comparison-shop for residential mortgages. This policy prescription ignores the fact that price revelation works differently in the prime and subprime markets, impeding search in subprime. In the prime market, lenders reveal firm prices for free, without requiring consumers to first submit loan applications. This dynamic, combined with Truth-in-Lending Act (TILA) disclosures that standardize prices, make it easy to comparison-shop for prime mortgages. In contrast, in the subprime market featuring risk-based pricing, consumers must reveal their creditworthiness before lenders can determine loan prices, which allows lenders ...


Turning A Blind Eye: Wall Street Finance Of Predatory Lending, Kathleen Engel, Patricia Mccoy Mar 2014

Turning A Blind Eye: Wall Street Finance Of Predatory Lending, Kathleen Engel, Patricia Mccoy

Patricia A. McCoy

Today, Wall Street finances up to eighty percent of subprime home loans through securitization. The subprime sector, which is designed for borrowers with blemished credit, has been dogged by predatory lending charges, many of which have been substantiated. As subprime securitization has grown, so have charges that securitization turns a blind eye to financing abusive loans. In this paper, we examine why secondary market discipline has failed to halt the securitization of predatory loans.

When investors buy securities backed by predatory loans, they face a classic lemons problem in the form of credit risk, prepayment risk, and litigation risk. Securitization ...


The Cra Implications Of Predatory Lending, Kathleen Engel, Patricia Mccoy Mar 2014

The Cra Implications Of Predatory Lending, Kathleen Engel, Patricia Mccoy

Patricia A. McCoy

Traditionally, policymakers, communities, and industry have regarded the Community Reinvestment Act ("CRA") as a positive mandate for banks and thrifts to do good by increasing investment in low- and moderate-income ("LMI") neighborhoods. When Congress enacted CRA, it was inconceivable that LMI neighborhoods might eventually receive too much credit in the form of abusive mortgages. However, by the late 1990s, predatory mortgages- exploitative high-cost loans to gullible borrowers-were ravaging the inner cities. We address the question: given the surge in predatory lending, how should CRA respond? CRA and federal subsidies to regulated lenders can create perverse incentives for lenders to engage ...


Turning A Blind Eye: Wall Street Finance Of Predatory Lending Feb 2007

Turning A Blind Eye: Wall Street Finance Of Predatory Lending

Patricia A. McCoy

Today, Wall Street finances up to eighty percent of subprime home loans through securitization. The subprime sector, which is designed for borrowers with blemished credit, has been dogged by predatory lending charges, many of which have been substantiated. As subprime securitization has grown, so have charges that securitization turns a blind eye to financing abusive loans. In this paper, we examine why secondary market discipline has failed to halt the securitization of predatory loans.

When investors buy securities backed by predatory loans, they face a classic lemons problem in the form of credit risk, prepayment risk, and litigation risk. Securitization ...


Rethinking Disclosure In A World Of Risk-Based Pricing Dec 2006

Rethinking Disclosure In A World Of Risk-Based Pricing

Patricia A. McCoy

The residential mortgage market in the United States has changed significantly since the passage of current federal mortgage disclosure laws in the 1960s and 1970s. In this Article, Professor Patricia McCoy advocates for the reform of these traditional disclosure rules. After describing the evolution of the subprime mortgage market and providing a description of current federal disclosure laws, she explores how these new market dynamics cause the traditional disclosure rules to break down in the subprime market. Professor McCoy concludes with proposals to counteract false advertising practices, facilitate "meaningful comparison-shopping, and formulate streamlined disclosures addressing loan applicants' greatest concerns in ...


A Tale Of Three Markets: The Law And Economics Of Predatory Lending Apr 2002

A Tale Of Three Markets: The Law And Economics Of Predatory Lending

Patricia A. McCoy

Predatory lending - the practice of making exploitative high-cost loans to naive borrowers - has spurred policy-makers, activists, lenders and scholars to debate whether intervention is warranted and, if so, what type of intervention is appropriate. The solution requires understanding the incentives in the home mortgage market that have fueled predatory lending. Recent changes in the credit market have created new possibilities for lenders to profit by exploiting information asymmetries to the detriment of unsophisticated borrowers. As a result, a new, predatory lending market has emerged alongside the legitimate prime and subprime home mortgage markets. Neither market forces nor existing legal remedies ...


The Cra Implications Of Predatory Lending Mar 2002

The Cra Implications Of Predatory Lending

Patricia A. McCoy

This article considers the Community Reinvestment Act's role in combating predatory lending. It provides an overview of the CRA, explains how CRA-covered lenders may enable predatory lending and explores the relationship between the CRA, federal subsidies and predatory lending. The article concludes that the CRA should be used to penalize lenders that engage in predatory lending and recommends that federal bank regulators use CRA to sanction behavior that could encourage further predatory lending.