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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

Dichotomy No Longer? The Role Of The Private Business Sector In Educating The Future Russian Legal Professions, Philip M. Genty Mar 2016

Dichotomy No Longer? The Role Of The Private Business Sector In Educating The Future Russian Legal Professions, Philip M. Genty

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


People’S Electric: Engaged Legal Education At Rutgers-Newark Law School In The 1960s And 1970s, George W. Conk Mar 2016

People’S Electric: Engaged Legal Education At Rutgers-Newark Law School In The 1960s And 1970s, George W. Conk

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Community Development Clinics: What Does Poverty Have To Do With Them?, Alicia Alvarez Jan 2007

Community Development Clinics: What Does Poverty Have To Do With Them?, Alicia Alvarez

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay argues that in a legal community development clinic, professors should "do more than teach students to be good transactional lawyers." Legal clinic professors should "focus their efforts on the elimination and reduction of poverty."


Re-Conceptualizing Poverty Law Clinical Curriculum And Legal Services Practice: The Need For Generalists, Jonel Newman Jan 2007

Re-Conceptualizing Poverty Law Clinical Curriculum And Legal Services Practice: The Need For Generalists, Jonel Newman

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay argues that law schools should adopt a program for training more legal generalists, especially in the field of poverty law. Furthermore, poverty law clinics should be the vehicle used to train these generalists.


Poverty Law And Civil Procedure: Rethinking The First-Year Course, Helen Hershkoff Jan 2007

Poverty Law And Civil Procedure: Rethinking The First-Year Course, Helen Hershkoff

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay argues that poverty and inequality issues should be integrated into first-year civil procedure courses. It examines what framework could be achieved to examine these issues in a civil procedure context. And finally, it connects the author's proposed approach with the broader mission of legal education.


Creeping Impoverization: Material Conditions, Income Inequality, And Erisa Pedagogy Early In The 21st Century, Maria O'Brien Hylton Jan 2007

Creeping Impoverization: Material Conditions, Income Inequality, And Erisa Pedagogy Early In The 21st Century, Maria O'Brien Hylton

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay argues that the current trend focusing on the law and economics theory does a disservice to the full-spectrum of legal issues. Law and economics, according to the author, is a value -neutral approach to the law. It fails to take into account poverty and other social values when thinking about the law. Finally, law schools should recalibrate their approach and, in some instances, take social values into account when teaching the law.


Musical Chairs And Tall Buildings: Teaching Poverty Law In The 21st Century, Amy L. Wax Jan 2007

Musical Chairs And Tall Buildings: Teaching Poverty Law In The 21st Century, Amy L. Wax

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay examines the evolution, demise and focus of welfare law courses in law school. It examines the content of these courses in an attempt to understand why these courses are not as popular as they once had been. Finally, it looks at the goals of welfare policy and what welfare law courses should teach.


The Pendulum Swings Back: Poverty Law In The Old And New Curriculum, Martha Davis Jan 2007

The Pendulum Swings Back: Poverty Law In The Old And New Curriculum, Martha Davis

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Essay seeks to answer the question "'What is Poverty Law'?" It does this in two parts. First, it examines the surge in property law courses in the 1960's and 70's and "the purpose these early courses were intended to serve." In the second section the Essay asks and the author asks "what the history suggests about poverty law in the law school curriculum today and in the future."


Legal Education After Law School: Lessons From Scotland And Englan, Clark D. Cunningham Jan 2005

Legal Education After Law School: Lessons From Scotland And Englan, Clark D. Cunningham

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Article addresses the issue of the needed collaboration between law schools and law firms about legal education after law school. The author proposes pilot projects be launched to increase collaboration between legal academics and law firms in the provision of legal education after law school. The Article suggests that the programs emulate the close partnerships that exist between the legal academy and legal profession in England and Scotland. The Article acknowledges why the training of lawyers is different now than in the past. The author compares the American law firm training programs with the post school education that takes ...


Pro Bono In Times Of Crisis: Looking Forward By Looking Back, Deborah Rhode Jan 2004

Pro Bono In Times Of Crisis: Looking Forward By Looking Back, Deborah Rhode

Fordham Urban Law Journal

Thousands of lawyers donated their time in response to the crisis of 9/11, but many did not. A remaining challenge is to ensure that the vast majority of the legal profession views public service as an essential professional responsibility. This essay examines previous studies on the pro bono contributions of those in the legal profession and how the findings of those studies show what motivations and sustains lawyers' public service. Specifically, this essay examines pro bono legal assistance in response to the 9/11 crisis. The author explains that it is essential to give law students a sense of ...


The Law School Consortium Project: Law Schools Supporting Graduates To Increase Access To Justice For Low And Moderate Income Individuals And Communities, Deborah Howard Jan 2002

The Law School Consortium Project: Law Schools Supporting Graduates To Increase Access To Justice For Low And Moderate Income Individuals And Communities, Deborah Howard

Fordham Urban Law Journal

The Law School Consortium Project is an organization with the goal of extending the educational and professionalism missions of law schools beyond graduation to provide training, mentoring, and other support to solo and small-firm lawyers. The Article discusses different models of achieving this goal. It outlines the benefits to practitioners, low and moderate income individuals and communities, and to participating law schools.


Mainstreaming Community Development: Business Strategies As Radical Approaches To Community Representation, Daniel S. Shah Jan 2002

Mainstreaming Community Development: Business Strategies As Radical Approaches To Community Representation, Daniel S. Shah

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This article argues that law school clinics are a means of providing positive change in representation in community development. Through a detailed case analysis of the Philadelphia Community Development Credit Union, the article illustrates how most technical assistance providers perpetuate an economic development structure which is contrary to consumer demand. These technical assistance providers carry out the goals and plans of the project funders (a top down approach) rather than focusing on the demands of the consumers. Community development clinics can step outside of the current market structure because they receive funding from independent sources and are thus able to ...


Making Lawyers Good People: Possibility Or Pipedream?, Subha Dhanaraj Jan 2001

Making Lawyers Good People: Possibility Or Pipedream?, Subha Dhanaraj

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Comment first outlines general conceptions of morality and moral development according to the widely accepted model promulgated by Professor Lawrence Kohlberg, and enunciates the importance of moral theory in the context of legal education. Next, it analyzes competing views of moral development and challenges some general concerns about the value of moral education in law schools. It then proposes the incorporation of moral teaching in the law school curriculum to remedy the disjunction between persona convictions and legal analysis stemming from the Langdellian method of legal training. Finally, it discusses the challenges to incorporating moral education into legal training ...


Teaching Jewish Law In American Law Schools: An Emerging Development In Law And Religion, Samuel J. Levine Jan 1999

Teaching Jewish Law In American Law Schools: An Emerging Development In Law And Religion, Samuel J. Levine

Fordham Urban Law Journal

There has been a "religious lawyering movement," where religion has gained increased prominence in the legal profession and academia. This essay discusses one aspect of the movement, Jewish law in the American law school curriculum. The author describes four models for courses teaching Jewish law in American law schools, outlining their advantages and disadvantages. The first model teaches Jewish law in comparative law. The course would compare and contrast the substantive areas of law in both Jewish and American law. The second model teaches Jewish law in international law. By focusing on the impact of Jewish law on Israel's ...


Local Innovations And Practical Answers To Campaign Costs, Bill Green Jan 1999

Local Innovations And Practical Answers To Campaign Costs, Bill Green

Fordham Urban Law Journal

In this transcript, former Congressman Bill Green and a member of the New York City Campaign Finance Board moderated a panel a five-person panel on the challenges campaign finance reformers face attempting to limit demand with regard to campaign finance. The panelists discussed the relationship between public campaign subsidies and efforts to encourage candidates to limit spending, provide more disclosure, restrict contribution amounts, and to mandate debate participation in the wake of the Supreme Court’s rejection of mandatory spending limits for federal candidates in Buckley v. Valeo, The panel also addressed reform efforts that seek to ease the demand ...


Does Law Teaching Have Meaning? Teaching Effectiveness, Gauging Alumni Competence, And The Maccrate Report, Daniel Gordon Jan 1997

Does Law Teaching Have Meaning? Teaching Effectiveness, Gauging Alumni Competence, And The Maccrate Report, Daniel Gordon

Fordham Urban Law Journal

This Article examines law school teaching evaluation techniques and probes the use of a law school alumni survey to measure teaching effectiveness. The Article focuses on a survey of St. Thomas University School of Law graduates. The Article also examines teaching effectiveness in the context of the MacCrate Report and the so called gaps between legal education and law practice it identified. The Article argues that the MacCrate Report was incomplete in its coverage of teaching effectiveness, and that much of the discord it created can be overcome by focusing on teaching effectiveness.