Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Fordham Law School

Discipline
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 11927

Full-Text Articles in Law

July 2019 - December 2019 Fordham Law School Faculty Bibliography, Fordham Law School Library Mar 2020

July 2019 - December 2019 Fordham Law School Faculty Bibliography, Fordham Law School Library

Faculty Bibliography

No abstract provided.


Climate Change, Technology Transfer, And Intellectual Property: A 'Modest Proposal' For An Ip Enforcement Moratorium, Dalindyebo Bafana Shabalala Feb 2020

Climate Change, Technology Transfer, And Intellectual Property: A 'Modest Proposal' For An Ip Enforcement Moratorium, Dalindyebo Bafana Shabalala

Fordham Environmental Law Review

No abstract provided.


Harvey: Environmental Justice And Law, Andrea Giampetro-Meyer, Nancy Kubasek Feb 2020

Harvey: Environmental Justice And Law, Andrea Giampetro-Meyer, Nancy Kubasek

Fordham Environmental Law Review

No abstract provided.


Flawlessly Strawless?, Marguerite Moloney Feb 2020

Flawlessly Strawless?, Marguerite Moloney

Fordham Environmental Law Review

No abstract provided.


How Regulators Can Reduce Fish Mortality From Recreational Fishing, Jonathan Agosta Feb 2020

How Regulators Can Reduce Fish Mortality From Recreational Fishing, Jonathan Agosta

Fordham Environmental Law Review

No abstract provided.


The New Cybersquatters: The Evolution Of Trademark Enforcement In The Domain Name Space, Michael Karanicolas Jan 2020

The New Cybersquatters: The Evolution Of Trademark Enforcement In The Domain Name Space, Michael Karanicolas

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The domain name space has become a particularly contentious area of trademark enforcement as a result of the growth of online commerce, an intense competition for popular domain names, and new conceptual challenges stemming from the borderless and textual nature of the medium. In response, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (“ICANN”), a global non-profit which oversees the domain-name space, has implemented a highly sophisticated set of rights-protection mechanisms. This Article examines the scope of trademark protections applied under ICANN’s rights protection mechanisms to demonstrate that they have evolved far beyond their traditional consumer protection function; indeed ...


Fashion's Destruction Of Unsold Goods: Responsible Solutions For An Environmentally Conscious Future, Ariele Elia Jan 2020

Fashion's Destruction Of Unsold Goods: Responsible Solutions For An Environmentally Conscious Future, Ariele Elia

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Over the past two years, headlines of fast-fashion and luxury brands burning their merchandise have flooded media outlets. While this came as a shock to the general public, it has actually been a standard industry practice for decades. As societal norms are leaning more towards environmentally conscious practices, destroying unsold products is no longer viewed as an acceptable option. Brands are facing increased scrutiny related to their environmental impact—such as the amount of textile waste that ends up in a landfill—and how they address the issue. While the media have criticized brands for these practices, they have not ...


The Role Of Intent In The Rise Of Individual Accountability In Aml-Bsa Enforcement Actions, Tyler Halloran Jan 2020

The Role Of Intent In The Rise Of Individual Accountability In Aml-Bsa Enforcement Actions, Tyler Halloran

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

The statutory framework which prohibits individuals at financial institutions from engaging in money laundering attributes criminal or civil liability on the basis of an individual’s culpability with respect to the prohibited conduct. A recent Department of Justice policy shift has begun to place a greater focus on the prosecution of individuals within corporations. This shift has led to increased prosecutions of compliance personnel and bank officials in recent years.

Through analysis of recent cases, this Note seeks to explore how the requirement of intentional and/or willful conduct defines the potential for criminal and/or civil exposure for compliance ...


Are Securities Laws Effective Against Climate Change? A Proposal For Targeted Climate Related Disclosure And Ghg Reduction, Nate Chumley Jan 2020

Are Securities Laws Effective Against Climate Change? A Proposal For Targeted Climate Related Disclosure And Ghg Reduction, Nate Chumley

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

The New York Attorney General filed a lawsuit against Exxon Mobil on October 24, 2018, claiming the company committed securities fraud in order to prop up the value of the company by publicly disclosing a higher proxy cost—or projected future cost—of climate change regulation than the internal cost used. Following this lawsuit, a federal class action was filed utilizing the same legal theory on the same facts. These lawsuits should be viewed as part of the larger history of lawsuits against large fossil fuel companies for climate change-related harms. Public nuisance theory largely captured a set of lawsuits ...


Newman/Martoma: The Insider Trading Law's Impasse And The Promise Of Congressional Action, Tai H. Park Jan 2020

Newman/Martoma: The Insider Trading Law's Impasse And The Promise Of Congressional Action, Tai H. Park

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

The prohibition against insider trading is a judge-made law that has evolved for over fifty years, and has reached a critical impasse in two recent decisions in the Second Circuit Court of Appeals: United States v. Newman and United States v. Martoma. Judges of the Second Circuit are sharply divided over what conduct constitutes improper trading on material nonpublic information (“MNPI”), leaving the law in profound disarray. At bottom, the disagreement stems from a decades-old split within the judiciary about how to (1) ensure a fair securities marketplace, while (2) enabling institutional analysts to probe for corporate information in furtherance ...


Multilateral Transparency For Security Markets Through Dlt, David C. Donald, Mahdi H. Miraz Jan 2020

Multilateral Transparency For Security Markets Through Dlt, David C. Donald, Mahdi H. Miraz

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

For decades, changing technology and policy choices have worked to fragment securities markets, rendering them so dark that neither ownership nor real-time price of securities are generally visible to all parties multilaterally. The policies in the U.S. National Market System and the EU Market in Financial Instruments Directive— together with universal adoption of the indirect holding system— have pushed Western securities markets into a corner from which escape to full transparency has seemed either impossible or prohibitively expensive. Although the reader has a right to skepticism given the exaggerated promises surrounding blockchain in recent years, we demonstrate in this ...


Reconciling U.S. Banking And Securities Data Preservation Rules With European Mandatory Data Erasure Under Gdpr, Ronald V. Distante Jan 2020

Reconciling U.S. Banking And Securities Data Preservation Rules With European Mandatory Data Erasure Under Gdpr, Ronald V. Distante

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

United States law, which requires financial institutions to retain customer data, conflicts with European Union law, which requires financial institutions to delete customer data on demand. A financial institution operating transnationally cannot comply with both U.S. and EU law. Financial institutions thus face the issue that they cannot possibly delete and retain the same data simultaneously. This Note will clarify the scope and nature of this conflict.

First, it will clarify the conflict by examining (1) the relevant laws, which are Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the U.S. Bank Secrecy Act, and Securities and Exchange Commission ...


Fame: Ownership Implications Of Intellectual Property And Agency Law, Max Stul Oppenheimer Jan 2020

Fame: Ownership Implications Of Intellectual Property And Agency Law, Max Stul Oppenheimer

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

In the pre-internet era, it was difficult to reach a wide audience without the help of a professional organization, so as a practical matter control typically rested with distributors rather than with talent. Now that direct public distribution is easy and inexpensive, distributors’ practical control has greatly diminished, and it is therefore important to consider the legal principles that govern the control of the use of “fame.” This Article defines fame as a bundle of intellectual property rights and analyzes the ownership of those rights under intellectual property and agency theories.


Fashion(Ing) A Political Statement: A Review Of The Legal & Social Issues That Arise From Banned Political Clothing And Other Controversial Fashion Items In Light Of The U.S. Supreme Court’S Decision In Minnesota Voters Alliance V. Mansky, Joyce Boland-Devito Jan 2020

Fashion(Ing) A Political Statement: A Review Of The Legal & Social Issues That Arise From Banned Political Clothing And Other Controversial Fashion Items In Light Of The U.S. Supreme Court’S Decision In Minnesota Voters Alliance V. Mansky, Joyce Boland-Devito

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Does the U.S. Supreme Court believe that the Free Speech Clause of the First Amendment includes freedom of expression in our clothing? The answer is yes! This Article will show that fashion can make a strong political statement (or misstatement) in the court of law as demonstrated by the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision striking down Minnesota’s ban on wearing “political apparel” to vote in Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky. The discussion of this case will include quotes from J. David Breemer, Esq., the attorney who represented the Minnesota Voters Alliance. This Article will examine related ...


Ai-Generated Fashion Designs: Who Or What Owns The Goods?, Caen A. Dennis Jan 2020

Ai-Generated Fashion Designs: Who Or What Owns The Goods?, Caen A. Dennis

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

As artificial intelligence (“AI”) becomes an increasingly prevalent tool in a plethora of industries in today’s society, analyzing the potential legal implications attached to AI-generated works is becoming more popular. One of the industries impacted by AI is fashion. AI tools and devices are currently being used in the fashion industry to create fashion models, fabric designs, and clothing. An AI device’s ability to generate fashion designs raises the question of who will own the copyrights of the fashion designs. Will it be the fashion designer who hires or contracts with the AI device programmer? Will it be ...


Substantial Similarity And Junk Science: Reconstructing The Test Of Copyright Infringement, Robert F. Helfing Jan 2020

Substantial Similarity And Junk Science: Reconstructing The Test Of Copyright Infringement, Robert F. Helfing

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

As the standard of copyright infringement, “substantial similarity” is an ambiguous concept that produces unpredictable decisions often inimical to the purposes of copyright law. This Article explains the deficiencies of infringement tests based upon that standard. It also provides an innovative interpretation of copyright protection and presents a new test of infringement designed to directly determine whether that protection has been violated.


Caveat Vendor: A Call To Reform The Scope Of Rights Of Withdrawal For Off-Premises Contracts Under U.S. Consumer Protection Laws With Respect To The Auction Of Art, Sarah Fabian Maramarosy Jan 2020

Caveat Vendor: A Call To Reform The Scope Of Rights Of Withdrawal For Off-Premises Contracts Under U.S. Consumer Protection Laws With Respect To The Auction Of Art, Sarah Fabian Maramarosy

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

As sales of art at auction become increasingly popular and accessible, an overlooked consumer right may cause sellers of art to get “burned.” At its core, the auction process is intended to establish the price of a difficult-to-value object of art, therefore, the underlying philosophy of an auction is that sales are final. However, cooling-off rules in U.S. off-premises contracts are broad enough that auction house contracts can potentially fall within the ambit of these rules, giving rise to the consumer’s right to cancel the contract.

Arguably, permitting consumers to cancel in remorse undermines the premise of an ...


Anything You Can Use, I Can Use Better: Examining The Contours Of Fair Use As An Affirmative Defense For Theatre Artists, Creators, And Producers, Benjamin Reiser Jan 2020

Anything You Can Use, I Can Use Better: Examining The Contours Of Fair Use As An Affirmative Defense For Theatre Artists, Creators, And Producers, Benjamin Reiser

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Broadway is booming. In a post-Hamilton world, ticket sales and attendance records for the commercial theatre industry continue to break season after season. At the same time (and perhaps not so coincidentally), litigation against theatre artists, creators, and producers has surged, especially in the realm of copyright infringement. Many theatre professionals accused of infringement in recent years have employed the doctrine of fair use—codified at 17 U.S.C. § 107—as an affirmative defense against such claims. This Note explores cases involving theatre professionals in which fair use was examined and contends that they collectively reflect broader historical ...


Fiddling With Federal Circuit Precedent: The Commercial And Qualitative Impact Of Recent Supreme Court Reversals On The U.S. Patent System, Christopher J. Hamersky Jan 2020

Fiddling With Federal Circuit Precedent: The Commercial And Qualitative Impact Of Recent Supreme Court Reversals On The U.S. Patent System, Christopher J. Hamersky

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Prior to 2006, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit enjoyed a fairly laissez-faire relation with the Supreme Court of the United States, enabling it to develop a patent law jurisprudence that patent practitioners could confidently rely on given that it had remained relatively stable for several decades. However, in 2006, the Supreme Court reviewed eBay v. MercExchange and subsequently began a string of frequent Federal Circuit reversals that have caused significant change to the U.S. patent system. Whereas the Supreme Court rarely took up patent appeals in the Federal Circuit’s early history, it now routinely reviews ...


Is Baseball Shrouded In Collusion Once More? Assessing The Likelihood That The Current State Of The Free Agent Market Will Lead To Antitrust Liability For Major League Baseball's Owners, Connor Mulry Jan 2020

Is Baseball Shrouded In Collusion Once More? Assessing The Likelihood That The Current State Of The Free Agent Market Will Lead To Antitrust Liability For Major League Baseball's Owners, Connor Mulry

Fordham Journal of Corporate & Financial Law

This Note examines how Major League Baseball’s (MLB) current free agent system is restraining trade despite the existence of the league’s non-statutory labor exemption from antitrust. The league’s players have seen their percentage share of earnings decrease even as league revenues have reached an all-time high. This reality is due to the players’ inability to “cash-in” when their market value hits its apex. Once these players enter the open market, their value has greatly deteriorated and consequently, they are unable to generate earnings commensurate with their value to the league.

This Note first explores the progression of ...


Trademark Vigilance In The Twenty-First Century: An Update, Peter S. Sloane Jan 2020

Trademark Vigilance In The Twenty-First Century: An Update, Peter S. Sloane

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The trademark laws impose a duty upon brand owners to be vigilant in policing their marks, lest they be subject to the defense of laches, a reduced scope of protection, or even death by genericide. Before the millennium, it was relatively manageable for brand owners to police the retail marketplace for infringements and counterfeits. The Internet changed everything.

In ways unforeseen, the Internet has unleashed a tremendously damaging cataclysm upon brands—online counterfeiting. It has created a virtual pipeline directly from factories in China to the American consumer shopping from home or work. The very online platforms that make Internet ...


Bounty Hunters For Algorithmic Cartels: An Old Solution For A New Problem, Aleksandra Lamontanaro Jan 2020

Bounty Hunters For Algorithmic Cartels: An Old Solution For A New Problem, Aleksandra Lamontanaro

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

In light of the reality that pricing algorithms allow commercial actors to perform all phases of their price-fixing conspiracies without leaving behind trails of traditional incriminating evidence, the scarcity of algorithmic cartels prosecutions is hardly surprising. Given well-documented evidence that the authorities struggle in their efforts to detect even conventional price-fixing cartels, it is imperative to come up with new tools for detecting algorithmic cartels, which have unprecedented potential to harm consumers if left ignored. This Note investigates algorithmic capabilities to collude, as well as legal and technical challenges that governmental authorities face in confronting such collusion. This Note then ...


Creation, Destruction, And The Future Of Fashion, Susan Scafidi Jan 2020

Creation, Destruction, And The Future Of Fashion, Susan Scafidi

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Double Jeopardy: Patents Of Invention As Contracts, Invention Disclosure As Consideration, And Where Oil States Went Wrong, N. Scott Pierce Jan 2020

Double Jeopardy: Patents Of Invention As Contracts, Invention Disclosure As Consideration, And Where Oil States Went Wrong, N. Scott Pierce

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Patents in England were once favors granted by the King with the requirement that the subject matter be practiced, or worked, for the benefit of the public. However, by the late eighteenth century patents were viewed as contracts with the government. Concomitant with this shift, the requirement to practice an invention was replaced by submission of a written specification disclosing to the public how to work the subject matter of the patent. In essence, advancement of the public good by grant of an exclusionary right to practice an invention at royal discretion was substituted with public disclosure as consideration for ...


Tear Down This Wall?: The Destruction Of Sanctioned Street Art Under U.S. And Italian Law, Sara Rosano, Birgit Kurtz Jan 2020

Tear Down This Wall?: The Destruction Of Sanctioned Street Art Under U.S. And Italian Law, Sara Rosano, Birgit Kurtz

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The United States and Italy are important countries for art and artists, including “street art”—also known as “aerosol art.” How does the law treat street artists in the two countries? Specifically, what are the legal consequences if an artist creates aerosol art on a wall or building with the property owner’s permission, and the property owner tears down the wall or building, thus destroying the artwork? In the United States, the 2018 decision in the 5Pointz case provided a detailed analysis of the applicable law; the court found in favor of a group of aerosol artists against the ...


An Instance Of Open Hardware: A Different Approach To Free And Open Source Hardware Licensing, Timothy Murphy Jan 2020

An Instance Of Open Hardware: A Different Approach To Free And Open Source Hardware Licensing, Timothy Murphy

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

As open source software (“OSS”) has become more prevalent, and more widely accepted, many different OSS licenses have proliferated to provide different licensing constructs for licensors and licensees. The most popular OSS license is the GNU General Public License (“GPL”), which is protective of author rights and intended to foster an open software community. Because software source code and object code files are primarily protected by copyright, the options for license terms are relatively straightforward and well-known. To the extent patent rights become an issue, various additional provisions have been proposed to address that issue in the context of the ...


Should The Ncaa Have To Pay? Long-Term Injuries In College Athletics, Improper Assumptions Of Risk, And Coverage Of Medical Expenses After College, Alexandrea Jacinto Jan 2020

Should The Ncaa Have To Pay? Long-Term Injuries In College Athletics, Improper Assumptions Of Risk, And Coverage Of Medical Expenses After College, Alexandrea Jacinto

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Student-athletes spend years training, perfecting their sport, and working hard in school in order to make it to the big leagues: Division I College Athletics. However, when student-athletes finally get there, they are met with empty promises, and often leave with injuries that no one took the time to warn them about. That is because, despite being told that they must sign an agreement with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) which binds them to the organization’s rules, athletes learn quickly that the other side of that agreement is rarely, if ever, upheld when they need it. Courts fail ...


The Prison Of Convenience: The Need For National Regulation Of Biometric Technology In Sports Venues, Kirsten Flicker Jan 2020

The Prison Of Convenience: The Need For National Regulation Of Biometric Technology In Sports Venues, Kirsten Flicker

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

In recent years, biometric data has crept its way into sports venues. In 2015, Major League Baseball began to use fingerprinting at stadium entrances. More recently, reporters have alerted spectators to the use of facial recognition technology in arenas such as Madison Square Garden. Proponents of these developments insist that the technology conveniences spectators, increases venue security, and enhances the overall spectator experience. Yet these claims fail to take into account the possibility of irremediable data breaches, the inaccuracies in facial recognition technology, and the privacy and unfair and deceptive trade practice concerns this technology raises. Further, there is an ...


Down The Rabbit Hole: Applying A Right To Be Forgotten To Personal Images Uploaded On Social Networks, Eugenia Georgiades Jan 2020

Down The Rabbit Hole: Applying A Right To Be Forgotten To Personal Images Uploaded On Social Networks, Eugenia Georgiades

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

The right to be forgotten has been the subject of extensive scrutiny in the broad context of data protection. However, little consideration has been given to the misuse of personal images that are uploaded on social networks. Given the prevalent use of online and digital spaces, social networks process and use various forms of data, including personal images that are uploaded by individuals. The potential for misuse of images is particularly acute when users upload images of third parties. In light of the European Union’s enshrinement of the “right to be forgotten” amid provisions of the General Data Protection ...


Movements, Moments, And The Eroding Antitrust Consensus, Michael Wolfe Jan 2020

Movements, Moments, And The Eroding Antitrust Consensus, Michael Wolfe

Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal

Timothy Wu, The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age (Columbia Global Reports, 2018). $14.99.

Timothy Wu’s book, The Curse of Bigness, offers a brief history on and critical perspective of antitrust law’s development over the last century, calling for a return to a Brandeisian approach to the law. In this review-essay, I use Wu’s text as a starting point to explore antitrust law’s current political moment. Tracing the dynamics at play in this debate and Wu’s role in it, I note areas underexplored in Wu’s text regarding the interplay of ...