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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Public Accommodation Statutes And Sexual Orientation: Should There Be A Religious Exemption For Secular Businesses?, Lucien J. Dhooge Feb 2015

Public Accommodation Statutes And Sexual Orientation: Should There Be A Religious Exemption For Secular Businesses?, Lucien J. Dhooge

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

This Article examines the issue of whether there should be a religious exemption for secular businesses from public accommodation statutes that protect prospective patrons from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The Article examines this issue in the context of protecting free exercise of religion versus offering services to all members of the public equally and without distinction. The Article concludes that the perceived threat to religious liberty posed by such statutes is exaggerated, that the consequences of granting exemptions would be harmful, and that state-sanctioned discrimination is contrary to the fundamental principles of justice and equality underlying the ...


Dias V. Archdiocese Of Cincinnati: Deciphering The Ministerial Exception To Title Vii Post-Hosanna-Tabor, Caroline O. Dehaan Feb 2015

Dias V. Archdiocese Of Cincinnati: Deciphering The Ministerial Exception To Title Vii Post-Hosanna-Tabor, Caroline O. Dehaan

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Texas Mis-Step: Why The Largest Child Removal In Modern U.S. History Failed, Jessica Dixon Weaver Apr 2010

The Texas Mis-Step: Why The Largest Child Removal In Modern U.S. History Failed, Jessica Dixon Weaver

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

This Article sets forth the historical and legal reasons as to how the State of Texas botched the removal of 439 children from the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints parents residing in Eldorado, Texas. The Department of Family and Protective Services in Texas overreached its authority by treating this case like a class-action removal based on an impermissible legal argument, rather than focusing on the facts and circumstances that could have been substantiated for a select group of children at risk. This impermissible legal argument regarding the “pervasive belief system” of a polygamist sect that allowed minor ...


Medical Conscience And The Policing Of Parenthood, Richard F. Storrow Feb 2010

Medical Conscience And The Policing Of Parenthood, Richard F. Storrow

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

As state and local anti-discrimination provisions become more and more comprehensive, physicians who refuse to treat patients for reasons of sexual orientation or marital status are beginning to face legal liability. Increasingly, physicians are invoking codes of medical ethics alongside more familiar constitutional law claims in support of their claim to insulation from legal liability. This Article explores what medical ethics has to say about physicians who, for sincerely held religious reasons, refuse to treat patients for reasons of sexual orientation or marital status. The issue is explored through the lens of a case recently decided by the California Supreme ...


Virginia Is For (Lovers) Business Owners Who Feel The Human Rights Commission Poses A Threat To Their Religious Liberties, Sarah Miller Apr 2008

Virginia Is For (Lovers) Business Owners Who Feel The Human Rights Commission Poses A Threat To Their Religious Liberties, Sarah Miller

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

In November 1992, the Arlington County Board voted to add "sexual orientation" to the group of classes protected under its antidiscrimination policy. When a store owner was sued for violating this policy in 2006, he countersued, claiming that Arlington did not have the power to enact such a policy. His claim was based on the existence of a strongly state-centered power hierarchy unique to a very small minority of states, including Virginia, laid out in the Dillon Rule. Virginia's use of the Dillon Rule basically cripples its municipal corporations by injecting uncertainty into the process of enacting local legislation ...


Petruska V. Gannon University: A Crack In The Stained Glass Ceiling, Sarah Fulton Oct 2007

Petruska V. Gannon University: A Crack In The Stained Glass Ceiling, Sarah Fulton

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

An examination of the protections afforded to religious institutions in their hiring decisions. Both § 702 of the Civil Rights Act and the judicially created ministerial exception allow churches to use criteria that other employers are not permitted to use under the law when making hiring decisions. Beginning with McClure v. Salvation Army, courts have slowly expanded the scope of these protections, leading up to the recent case of Petruska v. Gannon University. Petruska provides an example of the extent to which a broad reading of § 702 and the ministerial exception can harm religious workers. The opinion of Judge Becker, who ...


The Free Exercise Of Discrimination: Religious Liberty, Civic Community And Women's Equality, Gila Stopler Apr 2004

The Free Exercise Of Discrimination: Religious Liberty, Civic Community And Women's Equality, Gila Stopler

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.