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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Law

Public Accommodation Statutes And Sexual Orientation: Should There Be A Religious Exemption For Secular Businesses?, Lucien J. Dhooge Feb 2015

Public Accommodation Statutes And Sexual Orientation: Should There Be A Religious Exemption For Secular Businesses?, Lucien J. Dhooge

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

This Article examines the issue of whether there should be a religious exemption for secular businesses from public accommodation statutes that protect prospective patrons from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. The Article examines this issue in the context of protecting free exercise of religion versus offering services to all members of the public equally and without distinction. The Article concludes that the perceived threat to religious liberty posed by such statutes is exaggerated, that the consequences of granting exemptions would be harmful, and that state-sanctioned discrimination is contrary to the fundamental principles of justice and equality underlying the ...


Embryo Fundamentalism, June Carbone, Naomi Cahn May 2010

Embryo Fundamentalism, June Carbone, Naomi Cahn

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


Medical Conscience And The Policing Of Parenthood, Richard F. Storrow Feb 2010

Medical Conscience And The Policing Of Parenthood, Richard F. Storrow

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

As state and local anti-discrimination provisions become more and more comprehensive, physicians who refuse to treat patients for reasons of sexual orientation or marital status are beginning to face legal liability. Increasingly, physicians are invoking codes of medical ethics alongside more familiar constitutional law claims in support of their claim to insulation from legal liability. This Article explores what medical ethics has to say about physicians who, for sincerely held religious reasons, refuse to treat patients for reasons of sexual orientation or marital status. The issue is explored through the lens of a case recently decided by the California Supreme ...


Virginia Is For (Lovers) Business Owners Who Feel The Human Rights Commission Poses A Threat To Their Religious Liberties, Sarah Miller Apr 2008

Virginia Is For (Lovers) Business Owners Who Feel The Human Rights Commission Poses A Threat To Their Religious Liberties, Sarah Miller

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

In November 1992, the Arlington County Board voted to add "sexual orientation" to the group of classes protected under its antidiscrimination policy. When a store owner was sued for violating this policy in 2006, he countersued, claiming that Arlington did not have the power to enact such a policy. His claim was based on the existence of a strongly state-centered power hierarchy unique to a very small minority of states, including Virginia, laid out in the Dillon Rule. Virginia's use of the Dillon Rule basically cripples its municipal corporations by injecting uncertainty into the process of enacting local legislation ...


A Welfare State Of Civil Rights: The Triumph Of The Therapeutic In American Constitutional Law, Daniel F. Piar Mar 2008

A Welfare State Of Civil Rights: The Triumph Of The Therapeutic In American Constitutional Law, Daniel F. Piar

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

This Article examines the influence of the therapeutic culture on the modem constitutional law of civil rights. The therapeutic culture is defined as one in which the central moral question is individual fulfillment. That culture has sprung up to replace older cultures such as Protestantism and classical republicanism, which are no longer capable of appealing to a nation as diverse as the United States. Instead of asking whether individuals or the nation conform to some external moral system, the therapeutic culture asks whether individuals are happy or fulfilled. This Article demonstrates that the therapeutic culture has had a significant effect ...


Petruska V. Gannon University: A Crack In The Stained Glass Ceiling, Sarah Fulton Oct 2007

Petruska V. Gannon University: A Crack In The Stained Glass Ceiling, Sarah Fulton

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

An examination of the protections afforded to religious institutions in their hiring decisions. Both § 702 of the Civil Rights Act and the judicially created ministerial exception allow churches to use criteria that other employers are not permitted to use under the law when making hiring decisions. Beginning with McClure v. Salvation Army, courts have slowly expanded the scope of these protections, leading up to the recent case of Petruska v. Gannon University. Petruska provides an example of the extent to which a broad reading of § 702 and the ministerial exception can harm religious workers. The opinion of Judge Becker, who ...


Majority Rights, Minority Freedoms: Protestant Culture, Personal Autonomy, And Civil Liberties In Nineteenth Century America, Daniel F. Piar Feb 2006

Majority Rights, Minority Freedoms: Protestant Culture, Personal Autonomy, And Civil Liberties In Nineteenth Century America, Daniel F. Piar

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

No abstract provided.


The Free Exercise Of Discrimination: Religious Liberty, Civic Community And Women's Equality, Gila Stopler Apr 2004

The Free Exercise Of Discrimination: Religious Liberty, Civic Community And Women's Equality, Gila Stopler

William & Mary Journal of Race, Gender, and Social Justice

No abstract provided.


The Absolution Of Reynolds: The Constitutionality Of Religious Polygamy, Todd M. Gillett Feb 2000

The Absolution Of Reynolds: The Constitutionality Of Religious Polygamy, Todd M. Gillett

William & Mary Bill of Rights Journal

The ancient practice of polygamy became prevalent in parts of the United States in the mid-nineteenth century, when the Mormon Church canonized the doctrine of polygamy and encouraged its practice among its members. Today, there are nearly 40, 000 polygamists in the United States, mostly living in Utah. The Supreme Court has ruled on polygamy several times in decisions and dicta, each time finding it to be unconstitutional within the United States. In Reynolds v. United States, a 1878 decision upholding a statute that criminalized polygamy, the Court introduced the belief/action distinction that controls religious First Amendment doctrine today ...


Religiously Motivated "Outrageous" Conduct: Intentional Infliction Of Emotional Distress As A Weapon Against "Other People's Faiths", Paul T. Hayden Mar 1993

Religiously Motivated "Outrageous" Conduct: Intentional Infliction Of Emotional Distress As A Weapon Against "Other People's Faiths", Paul T. Hayden

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.


Cooperative Surplus: The Efficiency Justification For Active Government, Charles H. Koch Jr. Feb 1990

Cooperative Surplus: The Efficiency Justification For Active Government, Charles H. Koch Jr.

William & Mary Law Review

No abstract provided.