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Full-Text Articles in Law

How Irrational Actors In The Ceo Suite Affect Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones Aug 2018

How Irrational Actors In The Ceo Suite Affect Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Library Of Robert Morris, Civil Rights Lawyer & Activist, Laurel Davis, Mary S. Bilder Jun 2018

The Library Of Robert Morris, Civil Rights Lawyer & Activist, Laurel Davis, Mary S. Bilder

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This article analyzes the Robert Morris library, the only known extant, antebellum, African American-owned library. The seventy-five titles, including two unique pamphlet compilations, reveal Morris’s intellectual commitment to full citizenship, equality, and participation for people of color. The article provides a model for the interpretation of small law libraries.


Response Regarding Adopted Regulations (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0011), Patricia Mccoy, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators Jun 2018

Response Regarding Adopted Regulations (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0011), Patricia Mccoy, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response offering comment on the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau's adopted regulations and new rulemaking authorities.


Response Regarding Bureau Rulemaking Processes (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0009), Patricia A. Mccoy, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators Jun 2018

Response Regarding Bureau Rulemaking Processes (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0009), Patricia A. Mccoy, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response discussing whether the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau should alter its procedures for adopting new rules to protect consumers.


Response Regarding Bureau Public Reporting Practices Of Consumer Complaint Information (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0006), Pamela Foohey, Angela K. Littwin, Amy J. Schmitz, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators Jun 2018

Response Regarding Bureau Public Reporting Practices Of Consumer Complaint Information (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0006), Pamela Foohey, Angela K. Littwin, Amy J. Schmitz, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response discussing whether the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau should take down its consumer complaint database.


Understanding "Sanctuary Cities", Christopher N. Lasch, R. Linus Chan, Ingrid V. Eagly, Dina Francesca Haynes, Annie Lai, Elizabeth M. Mccormick, Juliet P. Stumpf May 2018

Understanding "Sanctuary Cities", Christopher N. Lasch, R. Linus Chan, Ingrid V. Eagly, Dina Francesca Haynes, Annie Lai, Elizabeth M. Mccormick, Juliet P. Stumpf

Boston College Law Review

In the wake of President Trump’s election, a growing number of local jurisdictions around the country have sought to disentangle their criminal justice apparatus from federal immigration enforcement efforts. These localities have embraced a series of reforms that attempt to ensure immigrants are not deported when they come into contact with the criminal justice system. The Trump administration has labeled these jurisdictions “sanctuary cities” and vowed to “end” them by, among other things, attempting to cut off their federal funding.

This Article is a collaborative project authored by law professors specializing in the intersection between immigration and criminal law ...


The Burgeoning “Biorights Movement”: Its Legal Basis, What’S At Stake, And How To Respond, Mark A. Hayden May 2018

The Burgeoning “Biorights Movement”: Its Legal Basis, What’S At Stake, And How To Respond, Mark A. Hayden

Boston College Law Review

The advent of genetic and genomic technologies has the power to transform the understanding, prevention, and treatment of disease on a scale unprecedented in modern medicine. The promise of the era of precision medicine risks being tempered by the emergence of what is increasingly being referred to as the “biorights movement.” Of particular concern is the growing trend of individuals refusing to contribute their biological material to research studies absent some form of monetary compensation. Recently announced, but yet to be implemented, regulations seek to mitigate some of the potentially harmful and progress-impeding positions advanced by the biorights movement. The ...


Doping Appeals At The Court Of Arbitration For Sport: Lessons From Essendon, David Mahoney May 2018

Doping Appeals At The Court Of Arbitration For Sport: Lessons From Essendon, David Mahoney

Boston College Law Review

In recent years, there has been an increase in the growth of the sports industry globally. With it has come the growth of global sports arbitration. The Court of Arbitration for Sport (“CAS”), created in part because of the increase in sport-related arbitration, is designed to promote efficiency and uniformity in the resolution of disputes. Despite the noteworthy objectives of the CAS, recent developments, such as the supplement scandal surrounding the Essendon Football Club of the Australian Football League, highlight the pressure that endures between individual athletes and sport governing bodies. This pressure is especially clear in instances where athletes ...


The Naked Truth: Insufficient Coverage For Revenge Porn Victims At State Law And The Proposed Federal Legislation To Adequately Redress Them, Meghan Fay May 2018

The Naked Truth: Insufficient Coverage For Revenge Porn Victims At State Law And The Proposed Federal Legislation To Adequately Redress Them, Meghan Fay

Boston College Law Review

The distribution of revenge porn is a cyber-bullying phenomenon that has proliferated on the Internet. The nonconsensual sharing of sexually explicit photographs and videos causes irreparable harm to revenge porn victims. The current state of the law, however, does little to redress the damage. Tort claims are often unsuccessful because many victims do not have the resources necessary to initiate a lawsuit. Furthermore, federal law grants operators of revenge porn websites immunity from state tort claims. In an effort to fill this gap in the law, many states have made changes or additions to their criminal statutes. To date, thirty-eight ...


Court Capture, J. Jonas Anderson May 2018

Court Capture, J. Jonas Anderson

Boston College Law Review

Capture—the notion that a federal agency can become controlled by the industry the agency is supposed to be regulating—is a fundamental concern for administrative law scholars. Surprisingly, however, no thorough treatment of how capture theory applies to the federal judiciary has been done. The few scholars who have attempted to apply the insights of capture theory to federal courts have generally concluded that the federal courts are insulated from capture concerns.

This Article challenges the notion that the federal courts cannot be captured. It makes two primary arguments. As an initial matter, this Article makes the theoretical case ...


Constitutional Anomalies Or As-Applied Challenges? A Defense Of Religious Exemptions, Stephanie H. Barclay, Mark L. Rienzi May 2018

Constitutional Anomalies Or As-Applied Challenges? A Defense Of Religious Exemptions, Stephanie H. Barclay, Mark L. Rienzi

Boston College Law Review

In the wake of Burwell v. Hobby Lobby and now in anticipation of Craig v. Masterpiece Cakeshop, Inc., the notion that religious exemptions are dangerously out of step with norms of Constitutional jurisprudence has taken on a renewed popularity. Critics increasingly claim that religious exemptions, such as those available prior to Employment Division v. Smith and now available under the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), are a threat to basic fairness, equality, and the rule of law. Under this view, exemptions create an anomalous private right to ignore laws that everyone else must obey, and such a scheme will ...


Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World's Polar Regions, Mark P. Nevitt, Robert V. Percival May 2018

Polar Opposites: Assessing The State Of Environmental Law In The World's Polar Regions, Mark P. Nevitt, Robert V. Percival

Boston College Law Review

Climate change is fundamentally transforming both the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions. Yet these regions differ dramatically in their governing legal regimes. For the past sixty years the Antarctic Treaty System, a traditional “hard law” international law treaty system, effectively de-militarized the Antarctic region and halted competing sovereignty claims. In contrast, the Arctic region lacks a unifying Arctic treaty and is governed by the newer “soft law” global environmental law model embodied in the Arctic Council’s collaborative work. Now climate change is challenging this model. It is transforming the geography of both polar regions, breaking away massive ice sheets ...


Response Regarding Bureau External Engagements (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0005), Cathy Lesser Mansfield, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators May 2018

Response Regarding Bureau External Engagements (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0005), Cathy Lesser Mansfield, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response discussing whether the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau should change the way it reaches out to public and the financial industry.


When The Defendant Doesn't Testify: The Eighth Circuit Considers A Reasonable Broken Promise In Bahtuoh V. Smith, Alexandre Bou-Rhodes May 2018

When The Defendant Doesn't Testify: The Eighth Circuit Considers A Reasonable Broken Promise In Bahtuoh V. Smith, Alexandre Bou-Rhodes

Boston College Law Review

In 2017, in Bahtuoh v. Smith, the Eighth Circuit held that a criminal defendant’s counsel was not ineffective for promising the jury that the defendant would testify, but failing to deliver on that promise. This Comment argues that the Eighth Circuit’s decision is in line with the decisions of other circuits in ineffective assistance of counsel cases where counsel promised the defendant’s testimony but later reneged on that promise. Courts should consider in their analysis, however, the impact such a decision may have on the jury, and that a stricter standard for evaluating counsel’s trial performance ...


A Pro Debtor And Majority Approach To The "Automatic Stay" Provision Of The Bankruptcy Code—In Re Cowen Incorrectly Decided, Claudia A. Restrepo May 2018

A Pro Debtor And Majority Approach To The "Automatic Stay" Provision Of The Bankruptcy Code—In Re Cowen Incorrectly Decided, Claudia A. Restrepo

Boston College Law Review

On February 27, 2017, in In re Cowen, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit held that only affirmative actions to either obtain possession or exercise control over property of the bankruptcy estate constitute violations of the automatic stay provision. In doing so, the court concluded that the passive retention of an asset that was acquired pre-petition was not a violation of the automatic stay, and that the creditor had no obligation to relinquish the asset to the bankruptcy estate. This Comment argues that the Tenth Circuit misinterpreted the automatic stay provision of the Bankruptcy Code, disregarding ...


Eleventh Circuit Prematurely Applied The Rule Of Lenity In United States V. Izurieta, C. Alex Dilley May 2018

Eleventh Circuit Prematurely Applied The Rule Of Lenity In United States V. Izurieta, C. Alex Dilley

Boston College Law Review

The statute that prohibits smuggling goods into the United States, 18 U.S.C. § 545, requires proof that a defendant knowingly or fraudulently imported merchandise or facilitated the transport of such merchandise “contrary to law.” In 2013, in United States v. Izurieta, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held that a regulatory violation carrying only civil implications could not serve as the underlying offense for the smuggling statute’s contrary to law provision given the felony criminal penalties associated with a violation of the statute. The Eleventh Circuit’s decision diverged from the 1994 and 2008 ...


Striving For Consistency: The Battle Of Jurisdiction In Enforcing Arbitration Awards, Leah Hengemuhle May 2018

Striving For Consistency: The Battle Of Jurisdiction In Enforcing Arbitration Awards, Leah Hengemuhle

Boston College Law Review

On January 20, 2017, in Ortiz-Espinosa v. BBVA Securities of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit expanded the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Vaden v. Discovery Bank and held that the “look through” approach to determine federal jurisdiction applied to petitions to enforce, modify, and vacate arbitration awards under the Federal Arbitration Act. The First Circuit relied heavily on the Supreme Court’s reasoning in Vaden to support its conclusion that applying the “look through” test created a single and consistent jurisdictional approach. This Comment argues that the First Circuit was correct ...


No Harm, No Foul: The Fourth Circuit Struggles With The "Injury-In-Fact" Requirement To Article Iii Standing In Data Breach Class Actions, Brandon Ferrick May 2018

No Harm, No Foul: The Fourth Circuit Struggles With The "Injury-In-Fact" Requirement To Article Iii Standing In Data Breach Class Actions, Brandon Ferrick

Boston College Law Review

On February 6, 2017, in Beck v. McDonald, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that the increased risk of future identity theft created by two data breaches was too speculative to constitute an injury-in-fact for the purposes of Article III standing. The court surveyed the split between its sister circuits and determined that, without allegations that a thief deliberately targeted information, misused, or attempted to misuse that personal information, the risk of identity theft was not sufficiently high so as to meet the injury-in-fact requirement of Article III standing. This Comment examines the Fourth Circuit ...


The Exigencies Of Drunk Driving: Cripps V. State And The Issues With Taking Drivers' Blood Without A Warrant, Timothy Andrea May 2018

The Exigencies Of Drunk Driving: Cripps V. State And The Issues With Taking Drivers' Blood Without A Warrant, Timothy Andrea

Boston College Law Review

Few of the government’s investigatory techniques implicate individual privacy concerns more than the taking and testing of a suspect’s blood. These blood draws are a common tool used to fight drunk driving. In 2013, in Missouri v. McNeely, the U.S. Supreme Court reiterated the need for case-by-case review when considering whether exigent circumstances justify warrantless blood testing of drunk driving suspects. An Oklahoma statute takes a different approach by categorically abdicating the warrant requirement and authorizing law enforcement to draw blood from any driver involved in an accident that results in serious bodily injury. In 2016, in ...


Response Regarding Bureau Enforcement Processes (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0003), Christopher L. Peterson, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators May 2018

Response Regarding Bureau Enforcement Processes (Docket No. Cfpb-2018-0003), Christopher L. Peterson, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response discussing whether the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau should stop taking enforcement actions against companies and people who violate the consumer financial protection laws.


Response Regarding Bureau Rules Of Practice For Adjudication Proceedings (Docket No. Cfpb–2018–0002), David Zaring, Jayme Wiebold, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators May 2018

Response Regarding Bureau Rules Of Practice For Adjudication Proceedings (Docket No. Cfpb–2018–0002), David Zaring, Jayme Wiebold, Financial Regulation And Consumer Protection Scholars And Former Regulators

CFPB Comments by Scholars & Regulators

Response discussing whether the Consumer Federal Protection Bureau should use administrative law judges to decide its enforcement cases.


Protecting States In The New World Of Energy Federalism, Daniel Lyons May 2018

Protecting States In The New World Of Energy Federalism, Daniel Lyons

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In a trilogy of recent cases, the Supreme Court has launched a quiet revolution in energy federalism. With little fanfare, it has abandoned its decades-long effort to divide electricity regulation into mutually exclusive spheres of federal and state authority. Instead it has embraced a more sophisticated concurrent jurisdiction model—against the wishes of Justice Scalia, who opposed this transformation in his final published dissent.

This Article explores the ramifications of this revolution, particularly for state energy regulators. The shift to concurrent jurisdiction is long overdue. The historic model of the local vertically integrated utility has long been replaced by regional ...


Top-Down Or From The Ground?: A Practical Perspective On Reforming The Field Of Children And The Law, Cheryl Bratt Apr 2018

Top-Down Or From The Ground?: A Practical Perspective On Reforming The Field Of Children And The Law, Cheryl Bratt

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Children get a raw deal in this country at the federal, state, and family levels. The law indisputably treats children in many limiting and paternalistic ways, typically designating them as objects to be controlled either by their parents or the government—two parties perpetually duking it out for authority. In their article, The New Law of the Child, 127 Yale L. J. 1448 (2018), Anne C. Dailey and Laura A. Rosenbury envision overhauling constitutional law to better promote children’s broader interests. Theirs is thus a top-down approach to change: by extending the Constitution to safeguard more robust rights for ...


Incapacitating Dangerous Repeat Offenders (Or Not): Evidentiary Restrictions On Armed Career Criminal Act Sentencing In United States V. King, Kayleigh E. Mcglynn Apr 2018

Incapacitating Dangerous Repeat Offenders (Or Not): Evidentiary Restrictions On Armed Career Criminal Act Sentencing In United States V. King, Kayleigh E. Mcglynn

Boston College Law Review

On March 30, 2017, in United States v. King, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit held that a sentencing court may not rely on information in bills of particulars for the Armed Career Criminal Act’s different-occasions inquiry. In so doing, the Sixth Circuit joined the Second, Fourth, Fifth, Seventh, Tenth, Eleventh, and D.C. Circuits in holding that sentencing courts deciding the different-occasions question may rely only on the evidentiary sources that the United States Supreme Court approved in Taylor v. United States in 1990 and Shepard v. United States in 2005. In contrast, on ...


A Case For Revisiting The Child Welfare Act, Hannah Dudley Apr 2018

A Case For Revisiting The Child Welfare Act, Hannah Dudley

Boston College Law Review

In 2017, in D.O. v. Glisson, the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit held that the Child Welfare Act of 1980 (the “Act”) creates a privately enforceable right to foster care maintenance payments and that this right could be enforced by an individual through the use of § 1983. In a similar case, Midwest Foster Care and Adoption Ass’n v. Kincade, the Eighth Circuit held that the Act does not create a privately enforceable right and thus, could not be enforced through the use of 42 U.S.C. § 1983. This Comment argues that the ...


The Road Beyond Kiobel: The Fifth Circuit's Decision In Adhikari V. Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. And Its Implications For The Alien Tort Statute, Vasundhara Prasad Apr 2018

The Road Beyond Kiobel: The Fifth Circuit's Decision In Adhikari V. Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. And Its Implications For The Alien Tort Statute, Vasundhara Prasad

Boston College Law Review

On January 3, 2017, in Adhikari v. Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit held that the Alien Tort Statute (“ATS”) did not provide jurisdiction for claims brought against a U.S. military contractor for torts committed in Iraq. In foreclosing plaintiffs’ claims, the Fifth Circuit held that the presumption against the ATS’s extraterritorial application barred claims for injuries occurring outside the United States’ territory. In so ruling, the court created a circuit split with the Fourth Circuit, which in Al Shimari v. CACI Premier Technology, Inc. held that the ATS provided ...


Unfaithful But Not Without Privacy Protections: The Seventh Circuit Addresses When Courts Should Consider An E-Mail Interception Unlawful In Epstein V. Epstein, Joseph Noreña Apr 2018

Unfaithful But Not Without Privacy Protections: The Seventh Circuit Addresses When Courts Should Consider An E-Mail Interception Unlawful In Epstein V. Epstein, Joseph Noreña

Boston College Law Review

On December 14, 2016, the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, in Epstein v. Epstein, held that contemporaneousness is not a determinative factor at the pleadings stage of a claim for the unlawful interception of electronic communications under the Federal Wiretap Act (“FWA”). In so doing, the Seventh Circuit partly departed from the way in which other Federal Circuit Courts had previously considered the statutory language of the FWA, specifically the definitions of “electronic communication” and “intercept” under 18 U.S.C. § 2510(4), (12). This Comment argues that the Seventh Circuit’s holding that contemporaneousness is ...


Adding To The List: The Latest Development In The Anomalous Seventh Circuit Substantial Compliance Approach, Julian Viksman Apr 2018

Adding To The List: The Latest Development In The Anomalous Seventh Circuit Substantial Compliance Approach, Julian Viksman

Boston College Law Review

In March 2017, in Northern Illinois Telecom, Inc. v. PNC Bank, N.A., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit reaffirmed its position to allow substantial compliance with Rule 11 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (“Rule 11”). In so doing, the Seventh Circuit remains the only circuit to allow for substantial compliance with Rule 11, rather than require a strict adherence approach. The Seventh Circuit’s approach, however, runs counter to Rule 11’s plain language and undermines the policy goals of the rule. This Comment argues that the Seventh Circuit should require parties to ...


Home Sweet Home? Determining Habitual Residence Within The Meaning Of The Hague Convention, Morgan Mcdonald Apr 2018

Home Sweet Home? Determining Habitual Residence Within The Meaning Of The Hague Convention, Morgan Mcdonald

Boston College Law Review

In becoming a signatory to The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction, the United States agreed to expeditiously return all internationally abducted children to the country of their habitual residence, such that that nation may determine the merits of any underlying custody disputes. The Convention failed, however, to instruct American courts as to how to determine a child’s habitual residence. This has resulted in a split among circuits as to whether habitual residence should be determined using objective evidence of the child’s perspective, subjective evidence of parental intent, or some combination. In 2017, the Eighth Circuit held in ...


Wouldn’T It Be Nice: Searching For Clarity In Intermittent Strike Adjudication, Thomas B. Fiascone Apr 2018

Wouldn’T It Be Nice: Searching For Clarity In Intermittent Strike Adjudication, Thomas B. Fiascone

Boston College Law Review

An employee’s right to strike has been a fundamental piece of American labor law policy since its codification in the 1935 National Labor Relations Act. Recently, however, strike activity has undergone a dramatic transformation in response to rapidly declining rates of unionization. Instead of numerous union members striking for weeks on end, small numbers of employees have engaged in surprise one-day strikes in an attempt to maximize the potential effect on employers despite the strike’s brief nature. Such strikes, often referred to as “intermittent strikes,” fall into an area of legal ambiguity due to prior inconsistent adjudication. As ...