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Full-Text Articles in Law

Chart Of Cases With Third Party Funding, Kirrin Hough Dec 2018

Chart Of Cases With Third Party Funding, Kirrin Hough

Law and Justice in the Americas Working Paper Series

Spreadsheet listing cases where investors sued foreign governments under international investment treaties, and where the case was funded on the investor's side by third parties.


Corporate Constitutional Rights: Easy And Hard Cases, Kent Greenfield Nov 2018

Corporate Constitutional Rights: Easy And Hard Cases, Kent Greenfield

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


Expansive Disclosure: Regulating Third-Party Funding For Future Analysis And Reform, Rachel Denae Thrasher Nov 2018

Expansive Disclosure: Regulating Third-Party Funding For Future Analysis And Reform, Rachel Denae Thrasher

Boston College Law Review

Third-party funding (TPF) is a relatively new phenomenon in the field of international investment arbitration. TPF takes place when a non-party to a dispute provides funding to one of the parties (usually the claimant) in return for a percentage of the amount recovered. International investment arbitration is a unique context, however, because investor-states dispute settlement puts States always in the role of respondent and private investors in the role of claimants. Despite this apparent imbalance, TPF proponents argue, among other things, that it provides much needed access to justice for poorer clients and adds value to the system by providing ...


Justice For All? Protecting The Public Interest In Investment Treaties, Alessandra Arcuri, Francesco Montanaro Nov 2018

Justice For All? Protecting The Public Interest In Investment Treaties, Alessandra Arcuri, Francesco Montanaro

Boston College Law Review

Investment arbitration has come increasingly under fire because of its design flaws. There is an emerging consensus that investment treaty arbitration not only falls short of ensuring a sufficient degree of transparency of arbitral proceedings and impartiality of arbitrators, but also that its institutional architecture is unjustifiably asymmetric, entrusting foreign investors with significant rights while no protection is afforded to the host states’ constituencies. In response to these criticisms, several states have attempted in recent years to reform the rules governing investor-state arbitration. A perusal of recently concluded international investment agreements, however, reveals that the reform efforts so far have ...


Should Investment Treaties Contain Public Policy Exceptions?, Caroline Henckels Nov 2018

Should Investment Treaties Contain Public Policy Exceptions?, Caroline Henckels

Boston College Law Review

The increasing inclusion of exceptions in newly concluded investment treaties, together with the divergent manner in which tribunals and annulment committees have approached these provisions, suggests that a greater understanding of their role and purpose is needed. In particular, the question whether exceptions operate as permissions or as defenses is a crucial but unaddressed issue that has significant implications for both litigation and practice and, in turn, implications for the stability of the regime. This Essay argues that as a starting point, exceptions should be understood as permissions that limit the scope of the substantive treaty obligations, and not as ...


Making Investment Arbitration Work For All: Addressing The Deficits In Access To Remedy For Wronged Host State Citizens Through Investment Arbitration, Emmanuel T. Laryea Nov 2018

Making Investment Arbitration Work For All: Addressing The Deficits In Access To Remedy For Wronged Host State Citizens Through Investment Arbitration, Emmanuel T. Laryea

Boston College Law Review

The current dominant system for resolving international investment disputes is the Investor-State Dispute Settlement system or, more precisely, the Investor-State Arbitration system (ISA). The ISA system has proved to be an effective avenue for remedy for foreign investors whose investments are wrongfully impaired by host states. However, the system is not accessible to Host State Citizens (HSCs) whose interests may be harmed by investors. Wronged HSCs can seek redress in domestic fora only. The domestic fora in many jurisdictions leave many wronged HSCs without remedy, a problem that has long been acknowledged. This Essay proposes a solution. It proposes that ...


Investment Treaties, Offshore Finance, And The Resource Curse, Karl M.F. Lockhart Nov 2018

Investment Treaties, Offshore Finance, And The Resource Curse, Karl M.F. Lockhart

Boston College Law Review

Questions of how best to understand offshore financial centers (“OFCs”)—countries that have low or zero tax rates, strong banking secrecy regulation, and easy-to-form legal entities—and what, if anything, the international community should do about them remain fixed on the agenda of national and international discourse. This Essay seeks to provide a new theoretical perspective on tax havens and applies this perspective to the cross-border legal regimes that govern international investment. This new analytical framework sees offshore financial centers as countries that are victims of the “resource curse,” as that term is described in economic development literature. Often physically ...


(Re)Calibration, Standard-Setting And The Shaping Of Investment Law And Arbitration, Eric De Brabandere Nov 2018

(Re)Calibration, Standard-Setting And The Shaping Of Investment Law And Arbitration, Eric De Brabandere

Boston College Law Review

Calibrating or (re)calibrating investment law and arbitration—depending on whether the exercise takes place for the first or a subsequent time—is different from rebalancing investment law and arbitration. A balancing exercise denotes a situation in which different elements are equal or in the correct proportions to maintain a sort of equilibrium. This Essay argues that investment law and arbitration are not necessarily about creating a situation in which all “elements” are in balance and that (re)calibrating is an interesting starting point for a discussion about the contemporary regime of investment law and arbitration, and especially to explore ...


I Wanna Design For Somebody (Who Needs Me): The Intersection Of Humanitarian Engineering, Choice-Of-Law, And Technology Transfer In Kenya, Sean Patrick Mcginley Nov 2018

I Wanna Design For Somebody (Who Needs Me): The Intersection Of Humanitarian Engineering, Choice-Of-Law, And Technology Transfer In Kenya, Sean Patrick Mcginley

Boston College Law Review

A significant technology gap exists between developed and developing countries. Though developing countries have started to self-innovate, they do not possess adequate means to fulfill their right to develop, which the UN recognizes as an essential human right. For developing countries to exercise this right, developed countries must transfer technology. Humanitarian engineers have confronted this challenge without any international guidance or regulation, as no uniform system for international technology transfer agreements exists. To remedy this inadequacy, scholars have proposed the characteristic approach, which suggests that the contents of the contract, rather than the parties’ locations, should control the choice of ...


Introduction: Investment Law For The Twenty-First Century, Frank J. Garcia, Sebastián López Escarcena Nov 2018

Introduction: Investment Law For The Twenty-First Century, Frank J. Garcia, Sebastián López Escarcena

Boston College Law Review

No abstract provided.


Legitimacy Concerns Of The Proposed Multilateral Investment Court: Is Democracy Possible?, José Manuel Alvarez Zárate Nov 2018

Legitimacy Concerns Of The Proposed Multilateral Investment Court: Is Democracy Possible?, José Manuel Alvarez Zárate

Boston College Law Review

Growing concerns in Europe about international investment regimes and investor-state dispute settlement systems pushed the European Union into pursuing the creation of an investment court system and a multilateral investment court. The European Union started this reform through the Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement, the Vietnam-EU Free Trade Agreement, and by direct persuasion of other countries to start negotiations at the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law. Visible reasons for the change include concerns over the perception of a lack of transparency, coherence, and arbitrators’ partiality, all of which diminish the legitimacy of the multilateral investment court. Other reasons might ...


Investment Disputes Oltre Lo Stato: On Global Administrative Law, And Fair And Equitable Treatment, Sebastián López Escarcena Nov 2018

Investment Disputes Oltre Lo Stato: On Global Administrative Law, And Fair And Equitable Treatment, Sebastián López Escarcena

Boston College Law Review

Global Administrative Law is an academic project that attempts to describe the emergence of a regulatory space beyond the state and to prescribe solutions to the problems it diagnoses through certain normative principles like participation, transparency, reasoned decision-making, judicial review, accountability, proportionality, and legitimate expectations. In the case of investment treaty arbitration, the principles advanced by Global Administrative Law are akin to the constitutive elements of the fair and equitable treatment that international arbitral tribunals have identified in investor-state disputes. As classified by international law scholars, these constitutive elements of fair and equitable treatment include due process, arbitrariness, non-discrimination, vigilance ...


Reforming International Investment Law: Opportunities, Challenges, Paradigms, Frank J. Garcia, Leo Gargne, Eric De Brabandere, Rachel Denae Thrasher, William Park Nov 2018

Reforming International Investment Law: Opportunities, Challenges, Paradigms, Frank J. Garcia, Leo Gargne, Eric De Brabandere, Rachel Denae Thrasher, William Park

Boston College Law Review

Transcription of a panel discussion.


The Circuit Split On Mens Rea For Aiding And Abetting Liability Under The Alien Tort Statute, Srish Khakurel Nov 2018

The Circuit Split On Mens Rea For Aiding And Abetting Liability Under The Alien Tort Statute, Srish Khakurel

Boston College Law Review

For decades since the Second Circuit Court of Appeals’ landmark decision in Filartiga v. Pena-Irala, the Alien Tort Statute has provided tools for human rights litigation in American federal courts. Nevertheless, after some controversial decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court and the Second Circuit in recent years, the scope of liability under the statute has diminished and the future of ATS human rights litigation is uncertain. In this context, one of the key issues is the level of culpability required for a defendant to be liable for assisting the human rights breaches of a third party. Specifically, the issue ...


Avoiding The Planned Obsolescence Of Modern International Investment Agreements: Can General Exception Mechanisms Be Improved, And How?, Camille Martini Nov 2018

Avoiding The Planned Obsolescence Of Modern International Investment Agreements: Can General Exception Mechanisms Be Improved, And How?, Camille Martini

Boston College Law Review

In light of the increase in investor-state disputes brought by foreign investors under the arbitration clauses contained in international investment agreements (“IIAs”), treaty negotiators have started to develop safeguards in recent IIAs in an attempt to mitigate the impact of these agreements on their regulatory powers. General exception clauses modeled on Article XX of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade are part of these new treaty provisions. General exceptions clauses are, in their current form, a source of uncertainty rather than coherence. Recent arbitration cases have shed light on the unworkable enforceability requirements contained in general exceptions clauses, preventing ...


Property Rights As Human Rights In International Investment Arbitration: A Critical Approach, Enrique Boone Barrera Nov 2018

Property Rights As Human Rights In International Investment Arbitration: A Critical Approach, Enrique Boone Barrera

Boston College Law Review

The treaty-based regime of investment protection is said to protect the property rights of foreign investors. Arbitral tribunals are usually tasked with settling investment disputes using principles of international law, some of which refer to the doctrine of protection of aliens. These features have led some commentators to compare the protection of foreign investment with the protection of property rights by human rights instruments and courts. This Essay provides a critical perspective on the relationship between these two systems. The Essay re-examines the widespread assumptions that underlie efforts to find parallels between human rights and foreign investment protection. The analysis ...


Balancing Sustainability, The Right To Regulate, And The Need For Investor Protection: Lessons From The Trade Regime, Elizabeth Trujillo Nov 2018

Balancing Sustainability, The Right To Regulate, And The Need For Investor Protection: Lessons From The Trade Regime, Elizabeth Trujillo

Boston College Law Review

Recent initiatives for investment reform demonstrated by the 2016 United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and 2018 World Investment Reports have raised key issues for sustainable development in the context of investment in natural resources and energy. Where there has been increasing convergence between trade and environmental norms as trade regimes confront domestic regulatory measures for environmental protection and climate change mitigation, similarly investment regimes also have had to address such domestic measures but with little progress towards normative convergence. At the same time, there’s an increasing skepticism for the traditional models of globalization of the 1990s and ...


Greening Investor-State Dispute Settlement, Daniel B. Magraw, Sergio Puig Nov 2018

Greening Investor-State Dispute Settlement, Daniel B. Magraw, Sergio Puig

Boston College Law Review

Climate change poses serious threats to human society. Climate change is already affecting our environment and thus, many aspects of human and economic activity. Among the challenges ahead, governments will need to more actively adopt regulatory policies given the international obligations in this area, such as the Paris Agreement, as well as promote green private investment as a means toward unlocking sustainable growth. How can international investment law be adapted and modernized to respond to these challenges? In this Essay, we summarize a comprehensive set of innovations that could be included in International Investment Agreements to address international obligations regarding ...


Third-Party Funding As Exploitation Of The Investment Treaty System, Frank J. Garcia Nov 2018

Third-Party Funding As Exploitation Of The Investment Treaty System, Frank J. Garcia

Boston College Law Review

Third-party funding of international investment arbitration is on the rise. Through TPF funders will cover the legal fees of investors filing claims under investment treaties in exchange for a portion of the arbitral award. Proponents of third-party funding claim that it provides access to justice for parties that normally would not have the funds to arbitrate against state actors. Given that the international investment law that governs these claims is unbalanced, and that funding only flows towards investor-claimants, and at the expense of states and their taxpayers, allowing third-party funding in investment arbitration risks creating unjustifiable wealth transfers from the ...


Finally Freed Or Infinitely Detained? The Need For A Clear Standard Of Finality For Reinstated Orders Of Removal, John Gavin Oct 2018

Finally Freed Or Infinitely Detained? The Need For A Clear Standard Of Finality For Reinstated Orders Of Removal, John Gavin

Boston College Law Review

Circuits are currently split as to whether reinstated orders of removal are final orders of removal. The resolution of this circuit split and related legislative ambiguity has far-reaching implications for the rights of the 150,000 or more unauthorized immigrants who enter the United States each year. Reinstated orders of removal are a means by which the United States government can more rapidly deport individuals who reenter the country after having been previously deported. On July 29, 2016, in Guerra v. Shanahan, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit declared that reinstated orders of removal are not ...


Tribal Sovereign Immunity And The Need For Congressional Action, Hunter Malasky Oct 2018

Tribal Sovereign Immunity And The Need For Congressional Action, Hunter Malasky

Boston College Law Review

Native American Indian tribal sovereign immunity is a judicially created doctrine that provides immunity from suit for Indian tribes in the United States. Although judicially created, the United States’ courts have repeatedly emphasized that only Congress has the power to limit Indian tribal immunity. As a result, tribal sovereign immunity has become a seemingly boundless means of avoiding lawsuits and liability. Moreover, tribal sovereign immunity has created a gap in the United States judicial system in which an individual may avoid certain lawsuits by entering into a favorable transaction with an Indian tribe. In these transactions, an individual may transfer ...


Criminal Doctrines Of Faith, David Jaros Oct 2018

Criminal Doctrines Of Faith, David Jaros

Boston College Law Review

Decisions like Miranda v. Arizona helped popularize a conception of the courts as a protector of criminal defendants and a bulwark against overly aggressive law enforcement. But from arrest through trial, the U.S. Supreme Court has fashioned criminal constitutional procedure with a deep and abiding faith in the motivations of the criminal justice system’s actors. Even decisions that vindicate individual constitutional rights at the expense of police and prosecutorial power are shaped by the Court’s fundamental trust in those same actors. They establish, in essence, “Criminal Doctrines of Faith.” Criminal Doctrines of Faith pervade each stage of ...


Judicial Conflicts And Voting Agreement: Evidence From Interruptions At Oral Argument, Tonja Jacobi, Kyle Rozema Oct 2018

Judicial Conflicts And Voting Agreement: Evidence From Interruptions At Oral Argument, Tonja Jacobi, Kyle Rozema

Boston College Law Review

This Article asks whether observable conflicts between Supreme Court justices—interruptions between the justices during oral arguments—can predict breakdowns in voting outcomes that occur months later. To answer this question, we built a unique dataset based on the transcripts of Supreme Court oral arguments and justice votes in cases from 1960 to 2015. We find that on average a judicial pair is seven percent less likely to vote together in a case for each interruption that occurs between them in the oral argument for that case. While a conflict between the justices that leads to both interruptions and a ...


Discriminatory Job Knowledge Tests, Police Promotions, And What Title Vii Can Learn From Tort Law, Mark S. Brodin Oct 2018

Discriminatory Job Knowledge Tests, Police Promotions, And What Title Vii Can Learn From Tort Law, Mark S. Brodin

Boston College Law Review

Nationally, the continued use of selection devices by police departments—such as multiple-choice examinations requiring memorization of police manuals—stifles advancement for a disproportionate number of otherwise qualified minority candidates, and hinders the desired diversification of the upper ranks. These exams have little to do with predicting success as a sergeant or other police supervisor. The traditional Title VII approach, a disparate impact challenge, has proven unsatisfactory given the relative ease with which the exams can be “content validated” in court. This Article proposes a new approach familiar to tort lawyers—the inference of intent from actions taken with foreseeable ...


Editing Nature: Reconceptualizing Biotechnology Governance, Jonas J. Monast Oct 2018

Editing Nature: Reconceptualizing Biotechnology Governance, Jonas J. Monast

Boston College Law Review

CRISPR-Cas9 (CRISPR) and other advances in gene editing techniques are fostering a rapid evolution within the field of biotechnology. Scientists can now modify the DNA of living organisms with precision by removing undesirable traits or inserting desirable traits. The edits may impact a single organism or result in genetic alterations that are designed to pass on to offspring (referred to as “gene drives”), potentially altering or eradicating an entire species. Prior to the discovery of the CRISPR gene editing process, the state of the technology presented barriers to widespread and precise genetic engineering. CRISPR changes the equation. With fewer technological ...


If Anyone Is Listening, #Metoo: Breaking The Culture Of Silence Around Sexual Abuse Through Regulating Non-Disclosure Agreements And Secret Settlements, Vasundhara Prasad Oct 2018

If Anyone Is Listening, #Metoo: Breaking The Culture Of Silence Around Sexual Abuse Through Regulating Non-Disclosure Agreements And Secret Settlements, Vasundhara Prasad

Boston College Law Review

Secrecy is an ally of sexual violence. For decades, victims of sexual abuse have remained silent about their experiences. The recent emergence of the #MeToo movement in the aftermath of the scandals surrounding movie mogul Harvey Weinstein and television personalities Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly raises larger questions about whether employers are partly to blame because of the widespread use of non-disclosure agreements in settlements. The movement, while exposing the magnitude of the problem, also makes it clear that silencing victims’ speech means that sexual violence will never truly be settled. This Note argues that non-disclosure agreements in cases ...


Who Can “Seize The Day?”: Analyzing Who Is An “Employee” For Purposes Of Unionization And Collective Bargaining Through The Lens Of The “Newsie” Strike Of 1899, Hannah Esquenazi Oct 2018

Who Can “Seize The Day?”: Analyzing Who Is An “Employee” For Purposes Of Unionization And Collective Bargaining Through The Lens Of The “Newsie” Strike Of 1899, Hannah Esquenazi

Boston College Law Review

In the summer of 1899, the Newsboys of New York banded together, formed a union, and began to “strike” against two of the city’s largest newspapers in response to a price increase. After a two-week struggle, the newspaper companies agreed to compromise by buying back any unsold papers at the end of the day from the Newsboys. They did not, however, agree to the Newsboys’ classification of the effort as a “strike.” The newspapers saw this as a boycott of non-employees, or independent contractors. After the turn of the century, Congress began to pass laws protecting employees, and in ...


Complementary Macroprudential Regulation Of Nonbank Entities And Activities, Patricia A. Mccoy, Daniel Schwarcz, Jeremy Kress Sep 2018

Complementary Macroprudential Regulation Of Nonbank Entities And Activities, Patricia A. Mccoy, Daniel Schwarcz, Jeremy Kress

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this blog entry, the authors describe their forthcoming law review article in Southern California Law Review.


The Constitution To The Constitution, Mary Sarah Bilder Sep 2018

The Constitution To The Constitution, Mary Sarah Bilder

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

An overview of the reasons that the 1787 Constitution lacked the historical and legal assumptions that underlie our contemporary idea of "The Constitution." Appropriate for constitutional law courses and American history courses at the university and secondary levels.

Excerpted from essay originally published in The New England Quarterly as "The Ordeal and the Constitution" and lightly edited for coherence.


How To End “Illegal Immigration”, Kari E. Hong Sep 2018

How To End “Illegal Immigration”, Kari E. Hong

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Since President Trump has taken office, it is clearer than ever that there are two ways to end “illegal immigration.” The first route — started by President Obama and ratcheted up by President Trump with relentless cruelty — is an actual effort to deport millions and exclude millions more. The second is to legalize those without status who have been, are, and will continue to contribute to America’s families, communities, and future.

This essay argues that the latter choice, restoring the paths to legalization that once were part of our nation’s laws, is the only realistic way forward to restore ...