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Religious Views As A Predictor Of Vote Choice, Erienne Plotkin Sep 2014

Religious Views As A Predictor Of Vote Choice, Erienne Plotkin

e-Research: A Journal of Undergraduate Work

This is a study of the relationship between the religious beliefs of people in the United States and their voting patterns. It is also a comparison between such results and that of more traditional voting predictors such as economic status or education level of voters. In general, there has been an apparent separation of church and state. More common predictors of voting behavior that have been used in the past are traditional demographics such as education levels and economic status. Although these traditional predictors are often accurate, religious belief and churches may play a greater, if insufficiently recognized role in ...


Empathy, Open-Mindedness, And Political Ideology: Conservative And Liberal Trends, Dani Cosme, Chrissy Pepino, Brandon Brown Sep 2014

Empathy, Open-Mindedness, And Political Ideology: Conservative And Liberal Trends, Dani Cosme, Chrissy Pepino, Brandon Brown

e-Research: A Journal of Undergraduate Work

This study hypothesizes that the religious variables will be superior to the predictive power of other demographic measures of the same population. This study will compare the results of religious questions to those of "To what economic class do you belong?" and "What is the highest level of education you have completed?" that are often used as reliable predictions of voting behavior.


Elite Leadership Of Opinion And The Public Polarization: The Same Sex Marriage Debate In The United States, Patricia Victorio Sep 2014

Elite Leadership Of Opinion And The Public Polarization: The Same Sex Marriage Debate In The United States, Patricia Victorio

e-Research: A Journal of Undergraduate Work

The California Supreme Court made a landmark decision with the court case In re Marriage Cases (2008), legalizing same sex marriage within the state, and overturning the California Defense of Marriage Act (Proposition 22). With a swift decision the supreme court put the controversial issue of same sex marriage back in the media spot light. Outside of California, states such as Arizona also reopened the debate of same sex marriage. The Arizona legislature put this issue up for a vote in the Fall 2008 election. The Arizona ballot measure, Proposition 102, wanted to define marriage between one man and one ...


The Effects Of Proposition 8 In The Lgbt Rights Movement In Orange County, Maria Claudia Brena Sep 2014

The Effects Of Proposition 8 In The Lgbt Rights Movement In Orange County, Maria Claudia Brena

e-Research: A Journal of Undergraduate Work

Proposition 8 was a California ballot initiative that banned same-sex marriage in November of 2008. The issue of same-sex marriage is usually framed in the media as a political and cultural battle where the two opposing sides argue about the legal and cultural repercussions of the recognition of same-sex unions for same-sex relationships and society. Rather than focusing on the legal implications of the Proposition 8 campaign and its outcome, this paper addresses the campaign's effects in the LGBT Rights Movement in Orange County. During the campaign many LGBTs became politically active for the first time in their lives ...


Are Approval Ratings An Accurate Reflection Of Success? Effects Of Media Coverage On Public Opinion Of Colin Powell, Michaela Dalton Sep 2014

Are Approval Ratings An Accurate Reflection Of Success? Effects Of Media Coverage On Public Opinion Of Colin Powell, Michaela Dalton

e-Research: A Journal of Undergraduate Work

No abstract provided.


Toward A United Ireland? The Northern Ireland Peace Process And The Devolution Of Powers From London To Belfast, Matthew G. Rooks Sep 2014

Toward A United Ireland? The Northern Ireland Peace Process And The Devolution Of Powers From London To Belfast, Matthew G. Rooks

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Agenda: Celebrating The Great Law: The Wilderness Act At 50, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches-Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment, The Wilderness Society Sep 2014

Agenda: Celebrating The Great Law: The Wilderness Act At 50, University Of Colorado Boulder. Getches-Wilkinson Center For Natural Resources, Energy, And The Environment, The Wilderness Society

Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50 (September 4-5)

"A conference sponsored by the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy, and the Environment and The Wilderness Society."

On September 3, 2014, the National Wilderness Preservation System—established and protected by the Wilderness Act of 1964—celebrates its 50th anniversary. We are gathering on September 4th and 5th to celebrate Wilderness—“ornery old wilderness, scratchy, sweaty, and distant, but sacred every step of the way”—and to commemorate the great law so central to its protection.

This is not an ordinary conference, full of dry presentations or heated policy debates. Instead, this will be a full-throated love song to wild ...


Interpreting Law: Jesus, The Lawyer, And The Parable Of The Good Samaritan, Calum M. Carmichael Sep 2014

Interpreting Law: Jesus, The Lawyer, And The Parable Of The Good Samaritan, Calum M. Carmichael

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Ages Of The Delegates At The Federal Convention: Early Birds And Worms?, Peter Aschenbrenner Sep 2014

Ages Of The Delegates At The Federal Convention: Early Birds And Worms?, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Of the fifty-five delegates who attended the federal convention at Philadelphia in 1787, the median in age was Oliver Ellsworth of Connecticut, thirty-two years old. The delegate with the median remaining life span was Jacob Broom of Delaware (thirty-three years). The early arrivers were neither older nor younger than the others. Nor were they marked down for a shorter or longer remaining lifespan.


Initial Federal Offices Created/Contemplated By The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter Aschenbrenner Sep 2014

Initial Federal Offices Created/Contemplated By The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Whether commands, permission, or prohibitions are trafficked, this three-way division credited to Jeremy Bentham, spatial logic dictates that for every office there must be, sooner or later, an office holder. The one hundred and seven offices created or contemplated by the Philadelphia Constitution are surveyed.


Table Annexed To Article: Unique Words In Constitutions I And Ii Surveyed, Peter Aschenbrenner Sep 2014

Table Annexed To Article: Unique Words In Constitutions I And Ii Surveyed, Peter Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Constitution I and Constitution II are surveyed with all words treated as appearing only once; that is, appearing uniquely. The texture of the two constitutions is presented with comparative lists of the 775 unique words of Constitution I with the 831 unique words of Constitution II; the 406 unique words of Constitution II which appear in Constitution I are calendared.


The Triumph Of The Hindu Right, Ananya Vajpeyi Sep 2014

The Triumph Of The Hindu Right, Ananya Vajpeyi

Ananya Vajpeyi

No abstract provided.


Review Of Michel Anteby, Manufacturing Morals: The Values Of Silence In Business School Education, Nicolas Cornell Sep 2014

Review Of Michel Anteby, Manufacturing Morals: The Values Of Silence In Business School Education, Nicolas Cornell

Legal Studies and Business Ethics Papers

How can we teach people to be moral? It is a difficult, deep, and terribly important question. Michel Anteby's Manufacturing Morals aims to make a contribution to answering that question by studying the inner workings of Harvard Business School (HBS).


Unique Words In Constitutions I And Ii Surveyed, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2014

Unique Words In Constitutions I And Ii Surveyed, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Constitution I and Constitution II are surveyed with all words treated as appearing only once; that is, appearing uniquely. The texture of the two constitutions is presented with comparative lists of the 775 unique words of Constitution I with the 831 unique words of Constitution II; the 406 unique words of Constitution II which appear in Constitution I are calendared.


Table Annexed To Article: Comparing American Constitutions I And Ii: Topics Treated In Constitution I With Similar Topics Followed Into Constitution Ii, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2014

Table Annexed To Article: Comparing American Constitutions I And Ii: Topics Treated In Constitution I With Similar Topics Followed Into Constitution Ii, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

OCL explores, topic by topic, the treatment by text-writers in Constitution II of similar text crafted in Constitution I. Results are surveyed, topic by topic.


Comparing American Constitutions I And Ii: Topics Treated In Constitution Ii Compared To Similar Topics In Constitution I, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2014

Comparing American Constitutions I And Ii: Topics Treated In Constitution Ii Compared To Similar Topics In Constitution I, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

OCL explores, topic by topic, the origins of Constitution II, in its appearance as the Early Constitution. Its 5,224 words are surely in debt to the 3,453 words of Constitution I. But by how much? The results are surveyed in the table annexed hereto.


Our Constitutional Kinesis: Words That Can Go Like A Machine, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2014

Our Constitutional Kinesis: Words That Can Go Like A Machine, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Constitution II, the Philadelphia constitution (1787), inspired many ‘machine/ry’ references. OCL catalogs, with the help of acknowledged secondary sources, a working list of metaphors which were deployed to credit and discredit our second constitution.


Table Annexed To Article: Initial Federal Offices Created / Contemplated By The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner Aug 2014

Table Annexed To Article: Initial Federal Offices Created / Contemplated By The Philadelphia Constitution, Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Peter J. Aschenbrenner

Compared to the Articles of Confederation the Philadelphia Constitution, consisting of 4,321 words, was relatively dense, if only taken in its count of titles and offices. The 107 offices created or contemplated by the Philadelphia Constitution are surveyed and the significance of the number of intersections is addressed.


A Case Of Open Access, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

A Case Of Open Access, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

I support ‘open access’, the enabling of unrestricted and free internet access to peer-reviewed scholarly research. Too much academic/scholarly writing is locked up behind the paywalls of multinational publishing empires, generating enormous profits from the unpaid, often publicly financed, labours of vassal scholars/academics. So too with scholarly books, confined as they are by small print runs and exorbitant ‘library copy/sale’ prices. To my mind there is much in contemporary scholarly publishing practice that reminds me of the medieval library at the heart of Umberto Eco’s novel The Name of the Rose (1980), hidden as it is ...


Book Review: Nichole Georgeou. Neoliberalism Development And Aid Volunteering, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Book Review: Nichole Georgeou. Neoliberalism Development And Aid Volunteering, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

As Nichole Georgeou explains at the start of her book, the gestation of this study was her immersion and experiences in the field of aid volunteering in Japan and North Vietnam (pp.xv-xviii). This was during the early 1990s, when she was in her early twenties; they were experiences that left her asking huge moral, ethical, political questions about volunteering.


Shaping Histories, Terence H. Irving, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Shaping Histories, Terence H. Irving, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

During the last few years, a number of researchers have interviewed the authors regarding their politics and practice in relation to 'history'. In reflecting upon their individual 'historiographies', they have put the following together. The authors met at Sydney University in the 1960s; Irving was a post-graduate student and a tutor; Cahill was an undergraduate student. They were two of the five founders of the Sydney Free University (1967-1972).


Review: 'Disobedience: The University As A Site Of Political Potential, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Review: 'Disobedience: The University As A Site Of Political Potential, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The radicalism of the 1960s and 1970s, and related student insurgency, is still largely uncharted territory when it comes to Australian history. There is a small body of scholarly research comprinsing theses, book chapter, journal articles, and an equally small number of relevant books. To my knowledge only one book, by Mick Armstrong (2001), attempts to survey and grapple with the entire period, its politics and complexities; in 114 pages, this is a brief but useful contribution.


The Looming War On Trade Unions, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

The Looming War On Trade Unions, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

In October 2013, the right-wing journal Quadrant published the book Australia’s Secret War, an account by Hal Colebatch of homefront industrial disruptions by Australian trade unions during the Second World War. Described as a secret history rescued from ‘folk memory’ – and one previously suppressed by leftists – it detailed ‘treacherous’ industrial actions by unionists that denied/delayed vital war materials to the frontlines between 1939 and 1945, resulting in the deaths of service personnel. These actions, the argument went, pointed to a deliberate and coordinated attempt at sabotaging the war effort courtesy of the communist leaderships of the unions involved ...


The Enemy Within, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

The Enemy Within, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

As the Anzac commemoration industry, awash with millions of dollars of government and corporate investment, gears up to celebrate the centenary of the Gallipoli landing in 2015 (embracing in the process all Australian military adventures overseas going back to involvement in the New Zealand Maori Wars of 1863–64), and the Sudan intervention of 1885), it is salutary to reflect on a seldom discussed Australian military tradition closer to home – in fact, at home. Simply, military might in Australia has, since early colonial days, been deployed on the home front. Forget the ‘feel good’ domestic use of military forces in ...


Breaking The Iron Collars, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Breaking The Iron Collars, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Review of Kevin Baker, "Mutiny, Terrorism, Riots and Murder: A History of Sedition in Australia and New Zealand", Rosenberg Publishing: Dural, 2006.


A Khaki Future?, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

A Khaki Future?, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Australia is a martial and warlike nation, established on beachheads on the east coast of the continent in 1789 by the military might of Britain. Long-running conflict with the indigenous people ensued, a struggle that went on into the 1920s and is yet to be incorporated into mainstream tellings of the history of the Australian nation. With invasion secured and indigenous dispossession well in hand, military interventions followed in the lands and affairs of others: in New Zealand during the 1860s against the Maori people, where volunteers were enticed with the promise of sharing confiscated land; the Sudan (1885–86 ...


Maritial Matters, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Maritial Matters, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Between 2006-2009, Rowan Cahill published a number of commentaries relating to the Anzac tradition, and to the Australian martial tradition generally, on the Leftwrites experiment in progressive group blogging. A selection of these commentaries follows; they represent views of the Australian martial experience at radical odds with mainstream Australian histories. The issues raised are still relevant, especially as the Australian government is currently spending its way through millions of dollars as it prepares to commemorate/celebrate the centenary of the Gallipoli landing (2015). Leftwrites is archived in the Pandora web archive of the National Library of Australia.


Would 'The Making Of The English Working Class' Get Made Today?, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

Would 'The Making Of The English Working Class' Get Made Today?, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

It is fifty years since leftist publisher Victor Gollancz published The Making of the English Working Class by English historian Edward Palmer Thompson (1924–1993). During 2013, this event has been, and is being, commemorated globally in political and scholarly conferences and journals. My dilapidated copy is the Penguin revised edition (1968), purchased in 1970. Still in print, and with more than a million copies sold worldwide, Thompson’s hugely influential doorstop book is regarded as a pivotal exploration of social history, as much an historical classic as it is a literary classic. The book runs to some 900 pages ...


The Making Of A Communist Journalist: Rupert Lockwook, 1908-1940, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

The Making Of A Communist Journalist: Rupert Lockwook, 1908-1940, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

The journalist/publicist Rupert Lockwood (1908-1997) was one of Australia’s best known Cold War communists, his name synonymous with the Royal Commission into Espionage in Australia, 1954-1955, as author of the notorious Document J. However the communist journalist did not spring fully formed into history. He joined the Australian Communist Party in 1939. This article traces Lockwood’s development as a journalist and his evolution as a communist between the wars. It is a story that ranges from small-town Western Victoria, and the West Wimmera Mail, to Melbourne and Sir Keith Murdoch’s Herald. In between, much of the ...


A Conscription Story, 1965-69, Rowan Cahill Aug 2014

A Conscription Story, 1965-69, Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Conscription (National Service) was re-introduced to Australia in November 1964, and ended in 1972. Conscripts were randomly selected by a lottery system for 20-year-old males. While it was not publicly known at the time, I in 12 eligible males were actually selected, though this ratio varied according to the number eligible each year and the actual number required by the army; so, for example, in October 1972 the chances of being selected were I in 20.1 Whilst historians tend to refer to conscripts as “men”, it should be remembered that in Australia during the 1960s neither the right to ...