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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Treatment Of People With Mental Illness In The Criminal Justice System: The Example Of Oneida County, New York, Alexander Black '19, Kylie Davis '18, Kenneth Gray '20, Connor O'Shea '18, Alexander Scheuer '18, Samantha Walther '18, Nico Yardas '18, Frank M. Anechiarico, Ralph Eannace, Jennifer Ambrose Jun 2019

The Treatment Of People With Mental Illness In The Criminal Justice System: The Example Of Oneida County, New York, Alexander Black '19, Kylie Davis '18, Kenneth Gray '20, Connor O'Shea '18, Alexander Scheuer '18, Samantha Walther '18, Nico Yardas '18, Frank M. Anechiarico, Ralph Eannace, Jennifer Ambrose

Student Scholarship

This publication is two-fold: an executive summary and the report itself. The executive summary provides a general overview of the larger report, on the criminalization of the mentally ill. It begins by summarizing three case studies from the report that concern the intersection of mental health issues and the criminal justice system in Oneida County in New York State. It then provides a brief historical overview of mental health issues and the criminal justice system before going on to discuss the current best practices in addressing the criminalization of the mentally ill, including law-enforcement mechanisms, mental health courts, and reintegration ...


Conflicting Approaches To Addressing Ex-Offender Unemployment: The Work Opportunity Tax Credit And Ban The Box, Katherine English Apr 2018

Conflicting Approaches To Addressing Ex-Offender Unemployment: The Work Opportunity Tax Credit And Ban The Box, Katherine English

Indiana Law Journal

Each year, roughly 700,000 prisoners are released from their six-by-eight-foot cells and back into society. Sadly, though, many of these ex-prisoners are not truly free. Upon returning to society, they often encounter several challenges that prevent them from resuming a normal, reintegrated lifestyle. For many, the difficulties associated with reentry prove to be too much, and within a short three years of their release, two-thirds of ex-offenders are rearrested, reconvicted, and thrown back into the familiar six-by-eight-foot cell. Recidivism might appear to be entirely the exoffenders’ fault, but ex-offenders are not solely responsible for these recidivism rates or the ...


Rethinking The Boundaries Of "Criminal Justice", Benjamin Levin Jan 2018

Rethinking The Boundaries Of "Criminal Justice", Benjamin Levin

Articles

This review of The New Criminal Justice Thinking (Sharon Dolovich & Alexandra Natapoff, eds.) tracks the shifting and uncertain contours of “criminal justice” as an object of study and critique.

Specifically, I trace two themes in the book:

(1) the uncertain boundaries of the “criminal justice system” as a web of laws, actors, and institutions; and

(2) the uncertain boundaries of “criminal justice thinking” as a universe of interdisciplinary scholarship, policy discourse, and public engagement.

I argue that these two themes speak to critically important questions about the nature of criminal justice scholarship and reform efforts. Without a firm understanding of what constitutes the “criminal justice system,” it is difficult to agree on the proper targets of critique or to determine what legal, social, and political problems are properly the province of “criminal justice thinking.” And, deciding which voices to accept and privilege in these ...


The Five Stages Of Lgbtq Discrimination And Its Effects On Mass Incarceration, Michael D. Braunstein Jul 2017

The Five Stages Of Lgbtq Discrimination And Its Effects On Mass Incarceration, Michael D. Braunstein

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

Although the Supreme Court’s recent decision in Obergefell v. Hodges provided some indication of equality for members of the LBGTQ community, the sad truth is that discrimination against those who do not identify as “heterosexual” reaches far deeper than the right to marry. This discrimination is especially present with regards to biased treatment by law enforcement officers and a lack of accommodations or protections within the court and prison systems. In a nation that has seen various groups of people fight for and earn their equality over and over again, it is truly concerning that the LGBTQ community is ...


You Can’T Handle The Truth: A Primer On False Confessions, Craig J. Trocino Aug 2016

You Can’T Handle The Truth: A Primer On False Confessions, Craig J. Trocino

University of Miami Race & Social Justice Law Review

No abstract provided.


Newsroom: Horwitz On Ri Probation Reform, Roger Williams University School Of Law Jul 2015

Newsroom: Horwitz On Ri Probation Reform, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Reducing Racial And Ethnic Disparities In Jails: Recommendations For Local Practice, Jessica M. Eaglin, Danyelle Solomon Jan 2015

Reducing Racial And Ethnic Disparities In Jails: Recommendations For Local Practice, Jessica M. Eaglin, Danyelle Solomon

Books by Maurer Faculty

People of color are overrepresented in our criminal justice system. One in three African American men born today will be incarcerated in his lifetime. In some cities, African Americans are ten times more likely to be arrested when stopped by police. With the national debate national focused on race, crime, and punishment, criminal justice experts are examining how to reduce racial disparities in our prisons and jails, which often serve as initial entry points for those who become entangled in the criminal justice system.

This report, which relies on input from 25 criminal justice leaders, pinpoints the drivers of racial ...


Teaching Prison Law, Sharon Dolovich Mar 2013

Teaching Prison Law, Sharon Dolovich

Sharon Dolovich

To judge from the curriculum at most American law schools, the criminal justice process starts with the investigation of a crime and ends with a determination of guilt. But for many if not most defendants, the period from arrest to verdict (or plea) is only a preamble to an extended period under state control. It is during the administration of punishment that the state’s criminal justice power is at its zenith, and at this point that the laws constraining the exercise of that power become most crucial. Yet it is precisely at this point that the curriculum in most ...


Recidivism And Juvenile Offenders: The Role Of The Counselor, William C. Gordon Feb 2013

Recidivism And Juvenile Offenders: The Role Of The Counselor, William C. Gordon

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Offender And The Victim, Edward Tromanhauser Nov 2012

The Offender And The Victim, Edward Tromanhauser

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Crime Victims' Rights -- A Legislative Perspective, William Van Regenmorter Nov 2012

Crime Victims' Rights -- A Legislative Perspective, William Van Regenmorter

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Emerging Issues In Victim Assistance, Marlene A. Young Nov 2012

Emerging Issues In Victim Assistance, Marlene A. Young

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Progress In The Victim Reform Movement: No Longer The "Forgotten Victim", David L. Roland Nov 2012

Progress In The Victim Reform Movement: No Longer The "Forgotten Victim", David L. Roland

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Victims' Rights: An Idea Whose Time Has Come--Five Years Later: The Maturing Of An Idea, Frank Carrington, George Nicholson Nov 2012

Victims' Rights: An Idea Whose Time Has Come--Five Years Later: The Maturing Of An Idea, Frank Carrington, George Nicholson

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Elevation Of Victims' Rights In Washington State: Constitutional Status, Ken Eikenberry Nov 2012

The Elevation Of Victims' Rights In Washington State: Constitutional Status, Ken Eikenberry

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Introduction, Ronald F. Phillips Nov 2012

Introduction, Ronald F. Phillips

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Death And Harmless Error: A Rhetorical Response To Judging Innocence, Colin Starger Feb 2008

Death And Harmless Error: A Rhetorical Response To Judging Innocence, Colin Starger

All Faculty Scholarship

Professor Garrett’s impressive empirical analysis of the first 200 post conviction DNA exonerations in the United States (“Garrett Study”) has the potential to affect contemporary debates surrounding our nation’s criminal justice system. This Response explores this potential by harnessing the Study’s data in support of arguments for and against a contested doctrinal proposition — that guilt-based harmless error rules should never apply in death penalty appeals. My analysis starts with the premise that the Study’s real world impact will necessarily depend on how jurists, politicians, and scholars extrapolate the explanatory power of the data beyond the 200 ...


The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael D. Mann Jun 2006

The “Csi Effect”: Better Jurors Through Television And Science?, Michael D. Mann

ExpressO

This Comment discusses how television shows such as CSI and Law & Order create heightened juror expectations. This will be published in the Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal's 2005-2006 issue.


Wrongful Convictions And The Accuracy Of The Criminal Justice System, H. Patrick Furman Jan 2003

Wrongful Convictions And The Accuracy Of The Criminal Justice System, H. Patrick Furman

Articles

No abstract provided.


Accountability Solutions In The Consent Search And Seizure Wasteland, José F. Anderson Mar 2001

Accountability Solutions In The Consent Search And Seizure Wasteland, José F. Anderson

All Faculty Scholarship

The legal and social issues that have emerged out of the doctrine that people in America have a right against unreasonable government instituted searches and seizures have dominated the dialogue and controversy in the American criminal justice system over the last three decades. A large portion of the debate has centered around the controversial exclusionary rule, which frees the sometimes unmistakably guilty because of irregularities in police procedure.

The notion that society suffers when criminals go free because of the constable's blunder has struck a decidedly political note in the discussion over criminal justice reform. Many observers are quick ...


Crime Control And Harassment Of The Innocent, Raymond Dacey, Kenneth S. Gallant Jan 1997

Crime Control And Harassment Of The Innocent, Raymond Dacey, Kenneth S. Gallant

Faculty Scholarship

Crime control through law enforcement is generally considered to be a two-part process of appre­hending and incapacitating or rehabilitating the guilty, and deterring the innocent from crime by the threat of punishment. The analysis presented here shows that the protection of the innocent from harass­ment-detention, arrest, punishment, and other intrusions by the criminal justice system-is important in deterring crime. Specifically, the analysis shows that deterrence from crime is weakened and then lost for a rational individual who holds the majority attitude toward risk, if the levels of rightful punishment and wrongful harassment are increased, as in a war ...


Consistently Inconsistent: The Supreme Court And The Confusion Surrounding Proportionality In Non-Capital Sentencing, Steven P. Grossman Mar 1996

Consistently Inconsistent: The Supreme Court And The Confusion Surrounding Proportionality In Non-Capital Sentencing, Steven P. Grossman

All Faculty Scholarship

(Adapted by permission from 84 Ky. L. J. 107 (1995)) This article examines the Supreme Court's treatment of the Eighth Amendment with respect to claims of excessiveness regarding prison sentences. Specifically, it addresses the issue of whether and to what degree the Eighth Amendment requires that a punishment not be disproportional to the crime punished. In analyzing all of the modern holdings of the Court in this area, one finds significant fault with each. The result of this series of flawed opinions from the Supreme Court is that the state of the law with respect to proportionality in sentencing ...


A Holistic Approach To Criminal Justice Scholarship, William T. Pizzi Jan 1995

A Holistic Approach To Criminal Justice Scholarship, William T. Pizzi

Articles

No abstract provided.


Finding An Optimum Legal Policy Level: The Undesirability Of Doing Too Much Or Too Little In The Law, Stuart S. Nagel Sep 1983

Finding An Optimum Legal Policy Level: The Undesirability Of Doing Too Much Or Too Little In The Law, Stuart S. Nagel

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Street Perspective: A Conversation With The Police, Patrick L. Baude Oct 1975

The Street Perspective: A Conversation With The Police, Patrick L. Baude

IUSTITIA

Professor Baude's purpose in this discussion is to elicit police officers' comments on what members of the legal profession ought to know about the influence of the "street perspective" in shaping those officers' attitudes towards the criminal justice system and the role they play in it. It is police insistence on the broad validity of insights which only "the street" can provide that accounts for the considerable gulf between "front-line" enforcement officers and other functionaries in (and students of) that system. Law students (and no doubt lawyers) seem uncomfortable with the notion that our system cannot adequately be understood ...


The Street Perspective: A Conversation With The Police, Patrick Baude, James F. Gallagher Jan 1975

The Street Perspective: A Conversation With The Police, Patrick Baude, James F. Gallagher

Articles by Maurer Faculty

No abstract provided.


Correctional System Needs, Susan S. Cole Oct 1973

Correctional System Needs, Susan S. Cole

IUSTITIA

One of the most difficult and pressing problems now facing local, state and national leaders is the failure of the criminal justice system. There is ample evidence of the system's failure: during the years 1960 to 1969, when the population increased by 13%, crime increased 1487,' and it is still increasing. Yet, correctional institutions do not appear to be places where criminal behavior is changed or where offenders are rehabilitated. They appear to be, instead, places where offenders are exposed to the most advanced criminal techniques and the most extreme anti-social behavior. Recidivism rates are estimated as high as ...


Transcendental Meditation And The Criminal Justice System, Stephen B. Cox Jan 1971

Transcendental Meditation And The Criminal Justice System, Stephen B. Cox

Kentucky Law Journal

No abstract provided.