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Full-Text Articles in Law

What State Am I In?: Common Law Trademarks On The Internet , Brian L. Berlandi Jun 1998

What State Am I In?: Common Law Trademarks On The Internet , Brian L. Berlandi

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

This essay explores the interaction between common law trademarks and the Internet--a relationship that has yet to be scrutinized by the intellectual property and Internet communities. More specifically, it strains to identify a common law mark's territorial zone of protection with respect to the Internet. This is an ambitious endeavor from the start, for there is no case law or published academic material available or directly on-point. As a result, this essay will not be a critique of judicial precedent or academic opinion. Instead, it offers a premonition of future case law and a foreshadowing of legal scenarios that ...


Law Of Nations In Cyberspace: Fashioning A Cause Of Action For The Supression Of Human Rights Reports On The Internet , Thomas Cochrane Jun 1998

Law Of Nations In Cyberspace: Fashioning A Cause Of Action For The Supression Of Human Rights Reports On The Internet , Thomas Cochrane

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

For nearly two decades, two U.S. statutes have provided redress to victims of human rights abuses: the Alien Tort Statute and the Torture Victim Protection Act. A handful of plaintiffs have recovered under these laws against foreign perpetrators of a narrow range of human rights violations. The growth and proliferation of communications technology raises important questions about how these statutes will be used in the future. Human rights activists have discovered that they can instantly communicate over the Internet with supporters and news media anywhere in the world. Repressive regimes have responded by attempting to restrict such communications. Could ...


"Chilling" The Internet? Lessons From Fcc Regulation Of Radio Broadcasting , Thomas W. Hazlett, David W. Sosa Jun 1998

"Chilling" The Internet? Lessons From Fcc Regulation Of Radio Broadcasting , Thomas W. Hazlett, David W. Sosa

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

Congress included the Communications Decency Act (CDA) in the Telecommunications Act signed into law on February 8, 1996. The bill seeks to outlaw the use of computers and phone lines to transmit "indecent" material with provisions of jail terms and heavy fines for violators. Proponents of the bill argue it is necessary to protect minors from undesirable speech on the Internet. The CDA was immediately challenged in court by the American Civil Liberties Union, and the special 3-judge federal panel established to hear the case recently declared the Act unconstitutional. Yet, its ultimate adjudication remains in doubt. Ominously, the federal ...


Profits In Cyberspace: Should Newspaper And Magazine Publishers Pay Freelance Writers For Digital Content?, Rod Dixon Esq. Jun 1998

Profits In Cyberspace: Should Newspaper And Magazine Publishers Pay Freelance Writers For Digital Content?, Rod Dixon Esq.

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

It is remarkable how fast recent trends have driven an increasing number of publishers of magazines, newspapers, and other similar works to port the print version of their works to digital and electronic format in the form of online computer databases and multimedia CDROM technologies. Online computer databases and CD-ROM media can be exceptionally profitable ventures for publishers who convert a preexisting print work into a digital product. However, publishers' profits from digital media may be impaired if there is a question as to whether the publisher has satisfactorily secured the copyright to the material making up the digital media ...


Jurisdiction In Cyberspace: A Theory Of International Spaces, Darrel C. Menthe Jun 1998

Jurisdiction In Cyberspace: A Theory Of International Spaces, Darrel C. Menthe

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

Unfortunately, when the law confronts cyberspace the usual mode of analysis is analogy, asking not "What is cyberspace?" but "What is cyberspace like?" The answers are varied: a glorified telephone, a bookstore, a bulletin board. I propose that we look at cyberspace not in these prosaic terms, but rather through the lens of international law in order to give cyberspace meaning in our jurisprudence. The thesis of this paper is that there exists in international law a type of territory which I call "international space." Currently there are three such international spaces: Antarctica, outer space, and the high seas. For ...