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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Law

An Analysis Of The Oslo Ii Agreement In Light Of The Expectations Of Shimon Peres And Mahmoud Abbas, Justus R. Weiner Jan 1996

An Analysis Of The Oslo Ii Agreement In Light Of The Expectations Of Shimon Peres And Mahmoud Abbas, Justus R. Weiner

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of Battling for Peace: A Memoir by Shimon Peres, and by Mahmoud Abbas


World Trade And The Environment: The Cafe Case, Eric Phillips Jan 1996

World Trade And The Environment: The Cafe Case, Eric Phillips

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Note examines the CAFE case in the context of the debate over trade and the environment. It argues that the panel decision has aspects that support the notion that the international trading system can be compatible with efforts to protect the environment, and also has aspects that demonstrate that these do indeed clash, limiting efforts to protect the environment. Part I of this Note describes the CAFE law and places it in the context of domestic and international efforts to prevent global warming. Part II examines the panel's decision, arguing that the panel acted well within the scope ...


U.S. Ratification Of The Convention On The Elimination Of All Forms Of Discrimination Against Women, Julia Ernst Jan 1996

U.S. Ratification Of The Convention On The Elimination Of All Forms Of Discrimination Against Women, Julia Ernst

Michigan Journal of Gender & Law

The purpose of this article is to highlight the need for ratification of the Convention by the United States, and to address arguments against ratification. Various concerns have been raised with respect to CEAFDAW, both specific to the United States and more international in scope. Some problems pertain to United States ratification generally, other issues concern potential conflicts between specific articles of the Convention and U.S. law, and broader problems have been raised with respect to international implementation. Most of these issues are not uncommon in international agreements, and may therefore be remedied through conventional mechanisms, including implementing legislation ...


The Role Of The United Nations Security Council In African Peace Management: Some Porposals, A. Peter Mutharika Jan 1996

The Role Of The United Nations Security Council In African Peace Management: Some Porposals, A. Peter Mutharika

Michigan Journal of International Law

The United Nations global peace management scheme is based on certain fundamental assumptions that require serious reexamination as we enter the twenty-first century. Fundamental to the 1945 vision of global peace management was the prevention of a third world war through collective action by the great powers. Structurally, this was to be achieved by a system of great power governance through the mechanism of the Security Council. While the Charter confers on the Security Council "primary responsibility" for the maintenance of international peace and security, executive decision-making is reserved for the great powers through permanent membership and the veto power ...


Reformulated Gasoline Under Reformulated Wto Dispute Settlement Procedures: Pulling Pandora Out Of A Chapeau?, Jeffrey Waincymer Jan 1996

Reformulated Gasoline Under Reformulated Wto Dispute Settlement Procedures: Pulling Pandora Out Of A Chapeau?, Jeffrey Waincymer

Michigan Journal of International Law

Part I of the article begins by outlining existing GATT/WTO provisions concerning trade-related environmental measures which were relevant to the Reformulated Gasoline case. Part II then outlines the facts in the dispute and gives a brief introduction to the decisions at the Panel and Appellate Body stages. Part III deals with the present and potential implications for the appellate process in terms of the substance of the dispute, the methodology and procedure adopted, and the wider issues that the case brings to attention. This Part also addresses some of the theoretical and practical issues that affect the question of ...


Is The Law Of War Really Law? War And Law Since 1945, Alfred P. Rubin Jan 1996

Is The Law Of War Really Law? War And Law Since 1945, Alfred P. Rubin

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of Law and War Since 1945 by Geoffrey Best


Theft By Territorialism: A Case For Revising Trips To Protect Trademarks From National Market Foreclosure, Beth Fulkerson Jan 1996

Theft By Territorialism: A Case For Revising Trips To Protect Trademarks From National Market Foreclosure, Beth Fulkerson

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Note will argue that the "well-known mark" standard of the Paris Convention, which is also adopted by the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, Including Trade in Counterfeit Goods (TRIPS), the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and the European Community (EC), is an artifact of an era when markets were circumscribed by national borders and granting a monopoly on a trademark in one country on the basis of its use in another was unreasonable because the likelihood of confusion was minimal. Today, however, the trademark originator's intent to expand beyond its original market should be ...


Trade And The Environment: Equilibrium Or Imbalance?, Douglas J. Caldwell, David A. Wirth Jan 1996

Trade And The Environment: Equilibrium Or Imbalance?, Douglas J. Caldwell, David A. Wirth

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of Greening the GATT: Trade, Environment, and the Future by Daniel C. Esty; Freer Trade, Protected Environment: Balancing Trade Liberalization and Environmental Interests by C.Ford Runge, François Ortalo-Magné, and Philip Vande Kamp; Trade and the Environment: The Search for Balance (James Cameron, Paul Demaret & Damien Geradin, eds.); and Trading Up: Consumer and Environmental Regulation in a Global Economy by David Vogel


The Right To Self-Defense Once The Security Council Takes Action, Malvina Halberstam Jan 1996

The Right To Self-Defense Once The Security Council Takes Action, Malvina Halberstam

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article discusses the views of these commentators in the light of the language, history, and policies underlying Article 51. It concludes that the Charter was not intended to and should not be interpreted to deny a state the right of self-defense, even if the Security Council has taken measures to deal with the problem; if states are to cede their right to self-defense once the Security Council has taken measures, that should be made explicit.