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Full-Text Articles in Law

International Law And Contemporary Slavery: The Long View, Rebecca J. Scott Nov 2017

International Law And Contemporary Slavery: The Long View, Rebecca J. Scott

Michigan Journal of International Law

The three essays in this special issue come together to confirm the value of exploring varying domestic expressions of and adaptations to international legal ideals. In each polity, lawmakers have viewed the terms “slavery” and “slave labor” in part through a domestic historical lens, and have drafted (or failed to draft) legislation accordingly. The United States inherited core concepts dating back to the moment of abolition of chattel slavery, and thus initially built its prohibitions of modern slavery on nineteenth-century rights guarantees and anti-peonage statutes, later reinforced by modern concepts of human trafficking. Having just emerged from a long dictatorship ...


Islam In The Secular Nomos Of The European Court Of Human Rights, Peter G. Danchin Jul 2011

Islam In The Secular Nomos Of The European Court Of Human Rights, Peter G. Danchin

Michigan Journal of International Law

If, with the benefit of hindsight, Mr. Choudhury's case was a harbinger of the emergence of various problems associated with Islam and the rights of Muslim minorities in European nation-states, then the events of September 11, 2001 have propelled these issues to the forefront of law and politics in a way unimaginable even a decade earlier. In Denmark, cartoons depicting the Islamic prophet Muhammad as a suicide bomber have been published leading to protests and violence across Europe and the Islamic world; a law prohibiting students in public schools from wearing symbols or attire through which they conspicuously exhibit ...


National Self-Determination And Ethnic Minorities, Olli Lagerspetz Jan 2004

National Self-Determination And Ethnic Minorities, Olli Lagerspetz

Michigan Journal of International Law

The paper will include three parts. In the first part, the relation between nationality and popular sovereignty is explored. In the second part, there is a somewhat analogous discussion of the concept of ethnicity. In the last part, the conclusions are applied in a discussion of ethnic nationalism.


Sub-State Nationalism And International Law, Margaret Moore Jan 2004

Sub-State Nationalism And International Law, Margaret Moore

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Article explores the relationship between international law, defined broadly as the principles, norms, and rules governing the international order and the aspirations for collective self-government by minority national communities. It argues that there will be increasing challenges to the current international legal rules by minority nationalists, and that it is important to develop a principled response to this challenge. It also argues that the current system privileges state actors to a great extent, and that any attempt to channel self-determination claims in a more benign, non-secessionist direction needs to address the statecentric biases of the current rules.


Commentary To Professor Guibernau, Annika Tahvanainen Jan 2004

Commentary To Professor Guibernau, Annika Tahvanainen

Michigan Journal of International Law

Commentary on Professor Montserrat Guibernau's Nations Without States: Political Communities in the Global Age


Freedom And Religious Tolerance In Europe, Peter Juviler Jan 2003

Freedom And Religious Tolerance In Europe, Peter Juviler

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of Protecting the Human Rights of Religious Minorities in Eastern Europe (Peter Danchin & Elizabeth Cole eds.)


The Act Of Hungarians Living Abroad: A Misguided Approach To Minority Protection, Christin J. Albertie Jan 2003

The Act Of Hungarians Living Abroad: A Misguided Approach To Minority Protection, Christin J. Albertie

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Note analyzes the Hungarian Status Law in the context of general principles of international law. By specifically examining the Hungarian minority, this Note questions whether the implementation of the Hungarian Status Law is the most effective method of ensuring the protection and respect of the Hungarian minority in Eastern Europe. The conclusion argues that the unilateral approach of the Hungarian Status Law should be abandoned for a bilateral approach to secure rights for the Hungarian minority.


Black Internationalism: Embracing An Economic Paradigm, Jeffery M. Brown Jan 2002

Black Internationalism: Embracing An Economic Paradigm, Jeffery M. Brown

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Article proposes a paradigm shift away from the traditional rights-based, Pan-Africanist trajectory of black internationalism, grounded largely in concerns over racial justice and Pan-African solidarity, and instead embraces an economically grounded black empowerment strategy that is responsive first and foremost to the unique economic imperatives of the emerging world economy. Indeed, the growing complexity of the emerging global economic order as represented by a shift toward rule formalism in the, international trade sphere and embodied in multilateral initiatives like the North American Free Trade Agreement, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, and the World Trade Organization, mandates that ...


Multicultural Jurisdictions At The National And International Levels, Christina L. Brandt-Young Jan 2002

Multicultural Jurisdictions At The National And International Levels, Christina L. Brandt-Young

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of Multicultural Jurisdictions: Cultural Differences and Women's Rights by Ayelet Shachar


Sexual Orientation And International Law: A Study In The Manufacture Of Cross-Cultural "Sensitivity", Eric Heinze Jan 2001

Sexual Orientation And International Law: A Study In The Manufacture Of Cross-Cultural "Sensitivity", Eric Heinze

Michigan Journal of International Law

Interest groups advocating rights of sexual minorities have been lobbying international organizations for years without success. A standard explanation for that failure is that human sexuality is something complex, even mysterious, which requires that international organizations proceed with special caution. In this essay, it will be argued that such an explanation amounts to a self-fulfilling prophecy. Sexual orientation is neither more nor less complex than many other issues, such as race, ethnicity, religion or gender, which have nevertheless found wide recognition within leading intergovernmental organizations. It is not because sexual orientation is uniquely complex or mysterious that it is barred ...


Toleration, Autonomy And Respect, Colin J. Harvey Jan 2000

Toleration, Autonomy And Respect, Colin J. Harvey

Michigan Journal of International Law

Review of On Toleration by Michael Walzer


Force Without Law: Seeking A Legal Justification For The September 1996 U.S. Military Intervention In Iraq, Gavin A. Symes Jan 1998

Force Without Law: Seeking A Legal Justification For The September 1996 U.S. Military Intervention In Iraq, Gavin A. Symes

Michigan Journal of International Law

This note concludes that none of the various legal arguments offered in support of the September 1996 military intervention against Iraq adequately justifies U.S. actions under international law and that in fact international law was never a real concern in planning, implementing, or even justifying the intervention. Part I relates the general history of the "Kurdish problem" and the particulars of the incident under scrutiny. This Part then goes on to describe the aftermath of the intervention and its failure to achieve any of the stated goals of the United States. Part II addresses the general validity under international ...


Problems And Prospects For The Kurdish Struggle For Self-Determination After The End Of The Gulf And Cold Wars, Richard Falk Jan 1994

Problems And Prospects For The Kurdish Struggle For Self-Determination After The End Of The Gulf And Cold Wars, Richard Falk

Michigan Journal of International Law

At a dinner in Istanbul with Kurdish journalists and academicians in early 1992, a young sociologist told the author that he had just finished a survey of Kurdish attitudes toward different solutions to the Kurdish problem. His principal finding was that Kurds living in the Middle East were generally in favor of modest solutions within the boundaries of existing States, while Kurds living in exile were overwhelmingly in support of the establishment of a single sovereign State, to be called Kurdistan, that would provide a homeland for all Kurdish people. Whether or not the study would satisfy social science standards ...


Perestroika African Style: One-Party Government And Human Rights In Tanzania, John Quigley Jan 1992

Perestroika African Style: One-Party Government And Human Rights In Tanzania, John Quigley

Michigan Journal of International Law

The one-party systems in Africa have drawn negative reactions from Western States that provide economic aid. The article assesses the one-party system in light of international human rights law and asks whether aid-giving States must consider whether one-party rule in recipient States violates international standards. In this connection, the article asks whether the rights of association and political freedom as developed in Europe can fairly be applied to Africa, given its historical experience.


Unwelcome Imports: Racism, Sexism, And Foreign Investment, William H. Lash Iii Jan 1991

Unwelcome Imports: Racism, Sexism, And Foreign Investment, William H. Lash Iii

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article will address the problems minorities and women face from Japanese foreign direct investment. This article focuses on Japanese direct investment because the rapid rise in Japan's direct investment in the United States, combined with a record of discrimination by Japanese firms in Japan and abroad, makes Japanese investment the best example of the problems addressed in this article. However, the discriminatory attitudes described here may well be held by other foreign investors, and therefore, the legislation proposed later in this article addresses a broader problem.


Self-Determination, Minority Rights, And Constitutional Accommodation: The Example Of The Czech And Slovak Federal Republic, Claudia Saladin Jan 1991

Self-Determination, Minority Rights, And Constitutional Accommodation: The Example Of The Czech And Slovak Federal Republic, Claudia Saladin

Michigan Journal of International Law

Part I of this note will explore the concepts of self-determination and minority rights in international law and their development over time. This is particularly relevant to the countries of Central and Eastern Europe, because these concepts saw their first full flowering in the period during and following the First World War, when those countries gained their independence from the European powers. Part II will discuss the evolution of the constitutional relationship between the Czechs and the Slovaks from the constitution of the first Czechoslovak Republic to the current constitutional reforms of the CSFR. This analysis will show the emerging ...


Exiting From The Soviet Union: Emigrés Or Refugees?, Zvi Gitelman Jan 1982

Exiting From The Soviet Union: Emigrés Or Refugees?, Zvi Gitelman

Michigan Journal of International Law

One of the most dramatic developments in the Soviet Union during the past decade has been the mass emigration of citizens, mostly of Jewish, German, and Armenian nationality. Emigration from the USSR had not been permitted, except for a tiny handful, since the early 1920s, although in the aftermath of World War II several hundred thousand Soviet citizens managed to remain in the West. These were either prisoners of war, slave laborers, Nazi collaborators, or simply people who took advantage of wartime chaos to flee the Soviet Union. But between 1971 and the end of 1980, over 300,000 Soviet ...