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University of Michigan Law School

1998

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Articles 1 - 30 of 192

Full-Text Articles in Law

Reforming Accretion Analysis Under The Nlra: Supplementing A Borrowed Analysis With Meaningful Policy Considerations, Matthew S. Miner Dec 1998

Reforming Accretion Analysis Under The Nlra: Supplementing A Borrowed Analysis With Meaningful Policy Considerations, Matthew S. Miner

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Current accretion analysis utilizes a variety of factors to determine whether to merge a non-unionized group of employees with a unionized group of employees within the same firm. The present construction of the analysis; however, ignores employee views and potential manipulation of the doctrine. By failing to account for these two important factors, current accretion analysis neglects two key concerns of the National Labor Relations Act - preventing employer discrimination and fostering uncoerced employee action and choice. This Note advocates a better approach, which gives proper weight to employee views and considers employer motive to control against the possibility of employers ...


The Political Economy Of Statutory Reach: U.S. Disclosure Rules In A Globalizing Market For Securities, Merritt B. Fox Dec 1998

The Political Economy Of Statutory Reach: U.S. Disclosure Rules In A Globalizing Market For Securities, Merritt B. Fox

Michigan Law Review

This Article addresses the appropriate reach of the U.S. mandatory securities disclosure regime. While disclosure obligations are imposed on issuers, they are triggered by transactions:- the public offering of, or public trading in, the issuers' shares. Share transactions are taking o n an increasingly transnational character. The barriers to a truly global market for equities continue to lessen: financial information is becoming increasingly globalized and it is becoming increasingly inexpensive and easy to effect share transactions abroad. There are approximately 41,000 issuers of publicly traded shares in the world. For an ever larger portion of these issuers, there ...


"Crimtorts" As Corporate Just Deserts, Thomas Koenig, Michael Rustad Dec 1998

"Crimtorts" As Corporate Just Deserts, Thomas Koenig, Michael Rustad

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Just as Grant Gilmore described "contorts" that lie on the borderline between contract and tort law, the authors coin the term "crimtort" to identify the expanding common ground between criminal and tort law. Although the concept of crimtort can be broadly applied to many areas of the law, this Article focuses on the primary crimtort remedy - punitive damages. The deterrent power of punitive damages lies in the wealth-calibration of the defendant's punishment. For corporations this means that punitive damages will reflect the firm's net income or net worth. The theoretical danger is that juries will abuse wealth by ...


Spare The Rod, Embrace Our Humanity: Toward A New Legal Regime Prohibiting Corporal Punishment Of Children, Susan H. Bitensky Dec 1998

Spare The Rod, Embrace Our Humanity: Toward A New Legal Regime Prohibiting Corporal Punishment Of Children, Susan H. Bitensky

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

This article proceeds from the simple premise that hitting children hurts them-even when the hitting does not rise to the level of child abuse as traditionally conceived. There is convincing evidence that corporal punishment is a hidden cruelty in child rearing that has serious adverse consequences for its victims and society at large. Yet forty-nine states permit parental corporal punishment of children and approximately half of the states permit such punishment in elementary and secondary schools The main purpose of this Article is to question the advisability of continuing the legalized status of corporal punishment of children in the United ...


Adverse Possession Of Municipal Land: It's Time To Protect This Valuable Asset, Paula R. Latovick Dec 1998

Adverse Possession Of Municipal Land: It's Time To Protect This Valuable Asset, Paula R. Latovick

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The laws of several states regarding adverse possession of municipal land vary widely from providing no protection to granting complete immunity from such loss. Generally, states that permit adverse possession of municipally owned land do so without articulating a rationale for allowing such a loss of a valuable municipal asset. In this Article, Professor Latovick describes why the current state of the law is unsatisfactory. She then considers the public policies raised by the issue of adverse possession of municipal land. Professor Latovick concludes by proposing that states should adopt legislation expressly protecting all municipal land from adverse possession and ...


An Original Model Of The Independent Counsel Statute, Ken Gormley Dec 1998

An Original Model Of The Independent Counsel Statute, Ken Gormley

Michigan Law Review

On Friday, October 19, 1973, President Richard M. Nixon took a risky step to de-fang the Watergate investigation that had become a "viper in the bosom" of his Presidency. The U.S. Court of Appeals had just directed him to tum over tape-recordings subpoenaed by Watergate Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox; these taperecordings might prove or disprove White House involvement in the Watergate cover-up. Rather than challenge this ruling, the President conceived a new plan. The White House would prepare summaries of the nine tape-recordings in question, which would be verified by Senator John Stennis, a seventy-two-year-old Democrat from Mississippi, working ...


Prohibiting Conduct, Not Consequences: The Limited Reach Of The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Benjamin Means Dec 1998

Prohibiting Conduct, Not Consequences: The Limited Reach Of The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Benjamin Means

Michigan Law Review

Dissatisfied with the protection afforded wildlife by more recent environmental laws, some environmentalists seek to reinterpret one of the oldest federal environmental laws, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Long understood simply to regulate hunting, the MBTA makes it illegal to "take" or "kill" migratory birds without a permit. The MBTA imposes strict liability for a violation. A heady combination of strict liability, criminal penalty provisions, and vague language, the MBTA appeals to those seeking to control land use activity. Some environmentalists advocate an interpretation of the MBTA that, contrary to legislative intent and 80 years of enforcement practice, would ...


Recent Books, Michigan Law Review Nov 1998

Recent Books, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A list of books recenlty received by Michigan Law Review.


Equal Rights, Special Rights, And The Nature Of Antidiscrimination Law, Peter J. Rubin Nov 1998

Equal Rights, Special Rights, And The Nature Of Antidiscrimination Law, Peter J. Rubin

Michigan Law Review

Despite the continued belief held by most Americans that certain characteristics should not form the basis for adverse decisions about individuals in employment, housing, public accommodations, and the provision of a wide range of governmental and private services and opportunities, antidiscrimination laws have increasingly come under attack on the ground that they provide members of the group against whom discrimination is forbidden with "special rights." The "special rights" objection has been voiced most strongly, but not exclusively, against laws that seek to prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. This line of attack has not always been effective, but ...


Reflecting On The Subject: A Critique Of The Social Influence Conception Of Deterrence, The Broken Windows Theory, And Order-Maintenance Policing New York Style, Bernard E. Harcourt Nov 1998

Reflecting On The Subject: A Critique Of The Social Influence Conception Of Deterrence, The Broken Windows Theory, And Order-Maintenance Policing New York Style, Bernard E. Harcourt

Michigan Law Review

In 1993, New York City began implementing the quality-of-life initiative, an order-maintenance policing strategy targeting minor misdemeanor offenses like turnstile jumping, aggressive panhandling, and public drinking. The policing initiative is premised on the broken windows theory of deterrence, namely the hypothesis that minor physical and social disorder, if left unattended in a neighborhood, causes serious crime. New York City's new policing strategy has met with overwhelming support in the press and among public officials, policymakers, sociologists, criminologists and political scientists. The media describe the "famous" Broken Windows essay as "the bible of policing" and "the blueprint for community policing ...


Lochner In Cyberspace: The New Economic Orthodoxy Of "Rights Management", Julie E. Cohen Nov 1998

Lochner In Cyberspace: The New Economic Orthodoxy Of "Rights Management", Julie E. Cohen

Michigan Law Review

Ninety-three years ago, in Lochner v. New York, the Supreme Court struck down a maximum-working-hours law for bakers as an impermissible invasion of employer-employee liberty of contract and, by implication, of the employer's property rights in his business. Lochner came to symbolize, and was vilified for, a vision of state power as rigidly circumscribed by the operation of judicially-determined laws of social ordering. By the late 1930s, the Court had changed course and accepted that the states' police power - or, in the case of Congress, the commerce power - encompassed even protective regulation of the parameters of the private employment ...


The Treaty Power And American Federalism, Curtis A. Bradley Nov 1998

The Treaty Power And American Federalism, Curtis A. Bradley

Michigan Law Review

For much of this century, American foreign affairs law has assumed that there is a sharp distinction between what is foreign and what is domestic, between what is external and what is internal. This assumption underlies a dual regime of constitutional law, in which federal regulation of foreign affairs is subject to a different, and generally more relaxed, set of constitutional restraints than federal regulation of domestic affairs. In what is perhaps its most famous endorsement of this proposition, the Supreme Court stated in 1936 that "the federal power over external affairs [is] in origin and essential character different from ...


Vol. 49, No. 4, October 23, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School Oct 1998

Vol. 49, No. 4, October 23, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Halloween Party Set for October 30 •Moot Court Season Begins •Figure Out Just How Big a Loser You Really Are •And You Thought Your Life Was Miserable •At Least Find Somewhere More Sophisticated than Rick's •I'll Be Siskel, You Be Ebert •Celebrate the Holidays- RG Style •Alcohol Eases the Pain


Vol. 49, No. 3, October 2, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School Oct 1998

Vol. 49, No. 3, October 2, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Baum Comes of Age •1Ls Elect Their Leaders •Baum Backs Down •1Ls Allowed to Attend Sonobe Lecture •We Find the Weirdest Things in Our Pendaflexes •What Some People Do for the Good of the Country •Some RG Staff Members Have the Way too Much Time on Their Hands •We are So Glad Larry Was Paroled


The New American Caste System: The Supreme Court And Discrimination Among Civil Rights Plaintiffs, Melissa L. Koehn Oct 1998

The New American Caste System: The Supreme Court And Discrimination Among Civil Rights Plaintiffs, Melissa L. Koehn

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Fifteen percent of the decisions issued by the Supreme Court during its 1996-97 Term centered around section 1983. Section 1983 provides civil rights plaintiffs with a procedural mechanism for vindicating their federally protected rights, including those enshrined in the Constitution. The Court's decisions from its 1996-97 Term reflect a continuation of the alarming trend that has permeated section 1983 for the last two decades-a movement to decrease the scope of section 1983, regardless of the impact on constitutional rights. The Supreme Court appears to be creating a hierarchy both of constitutional rights and of plaintiffs: free speech and takings ...


Expanding The Circle Of Membership By Reconstructing The "Alien": Lessons From Social Psychology And The "Promise Enforcement" Cases, Victor C. Romero Oct 1998

Expanding The Circle Of Membership By Reconstructing The "Alien": Lessons From Social Psychology And The "Promise Enforcement" Cases, Victor C. Romero

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Recent legal scholarship suggests that the Supreme Court's decisions on immigrants' rights favor conceptions of membership over personhood. Federal courts are often reluctant to recognize the personal rights claims of noncitizens because they are not members of the United States. Professor Michael Scaperlanda argues that because the courts have left the protection of noncitizens' rights in the hands of Congress and, therefore, its constituents, U.S. citizens must engage in a serious dialogue regarding membership in this polity while considering the importance of constitutional principles of personhood. This Article takes up Scaperlanda's challenge. Borrowing from recent research in ...


First, Do No Harm: The Use Of Covert Video Surveillance To Detect Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy- An Unethical Means Of "Preventing" Child Abuse, Michael T. Flannery Oct 1998

First, Do No Harm: The Use Of Covert Video Surveillance To Detect Munchausen Syndrome By Proxy- An Unethical Means Of "Preventing" Child Abuse, Michael T. Flannery

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Since it was first identified in 1977, Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy has uniquely affected the way in which the medical and legal communities deal with the issue of child abuse. Inherent in the medical response to the disease are issues of suspicion, investigation, identification, confrontation, and, of course, the health of an innocent child. Given the deceptive dynamics of the disease, however, denial and disbelief naturally overshadow every action taken by medical professionals in pursuing these issues. Fortunately, as medical knowledge about the dynamics of the disease continues to develop, medical professionals become more willing and better able to identify ...


A Call For Reform Of Recent Immigration Legislation, Jason H. Ehrenberg Oct 1998

A Call For Reform Of Recent Immigration Legislation, Jason H. Ehrenberg

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 dramatically limit the procedural rights of aliens who have been convicted of serious crimes. Consequently, aliens who have immigrated to the United States to escape persecution in their homelands are deported without adequate hearing or appeal. This Note argues that the laws violate international obligations and Constitutional law. It advocates amending the laws to give the Attorney General discretion over deportation decisions, eliminating retroactive application of deportation for aggravated felons, and reinstating judicial review of deportation or exclusion decisions.


The Commerce Clause Meets The Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Fly, John Copeland Nagle Oct 1998

The Commerce Clause Meets The Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Fly, John Copeland Nagle

Michigan Law Review

The protagonist in our story has six legs, is one inch long, and dies two weeks after it emerges from the ground. To the untrained eye, the Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Fly looks like, well, a big fly. Entomologists know better. This particular fly can hover like a hummingbird as it uses its long tubular nose to extract nectar from flowers. It can only live in particular fine soils - the Delhi sands - that appear in patches over a forty square mile stretch from Colton to Ontario, California. Today only a few hundred Delhi Sands Flower-Loving Flies survive in less than a ...


Competition And Cooperation, Saul Levmore Oct 1998

Competition And Cooperation, Saul Levmore

Michigan Law Review

When do competitors share assets and other opportunities for mutual gain? Conversely, when do they prefer to distinguish themselves by establishing firm boundaries that produce a minimum of sharing or cooperation despite potential gains from trade? Why, for example, do competing law schools in a single city cooperate so little in offering joint programs and economizing on certain costs even as they use the same casebooks in their courses and borrow from one another's libraries? Why do two competing auto makers rarely sell one another components or use the same expert advertising agency or law firm but then quite ...


Books Received, Michigan Law Review Oct 1998

Books Received, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A list of books recenlty received by Michigan Law Review.


Ultra Vires Takings, Matthew D. Zinn Oct 1998

Ultra Vires Takings, Matthew D. Zinn

Michigan Law Review

When does legislative or administrative regulatory action "go[] too far" and effectively amount to an .appropriation of private property for which the Fifth Amendment requires just compensation? This question has turned out to be one of the thorniest in American constitutional law. The Supreme Court has identified several circumstances in which one can expect to find a regulatory taking, but its numerous pronouncements on the subject give no clear rule to distinguish compensable takings from noncompensable interference with property rights. Notwithstanding its volume, the commentary on the Takings Clause by and large addresses only proper governmental action that rises to ...


Rights Against Rules: The Moral Structure Of American Constitutional Law, Matthew D. Adler Oct 1998

Rights Against Rules: The Moral Structure Of American Constitutional Law, Matthew D. Adler

Michigan Law Review

The Bill of Rights, by means of open-ended terms such as "freedom of speech," "equal protection," or "due process," refers to moral criteria, which take on constitutional status by virtue of being thus referenced. We can disagree about whether the proper methodology for judicial application of these criteria is originalist or nonoriginalist. The originalist looks, not to the true content of the moral criteria named by the Constitution, but to the framers' beliefs about that content; the nonoriginalist tries to determine what the criteria truly require, and ignores or gives less weight to the framers' views. Bracketing this disagreement, however ...


Vol. 49, No. 2, September 18, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School Sep 1998

Vol. 49, No. 2, September 18, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•A Fresh Start for Career Services •LSSS Passes New Funding Policy •Law School Hires Five New Faculty Members •Are Student/Faculty Relationships Good? •But Did He Ever Get to Meet the Beatles? •Give Me a Home, Where the Buffalo Roam, and the Geeks and the Antelope Play? •Welcome Back Larry •But Doesn't Sierre Leone Need Legal Services?


Vol. 49, No. 1, September 3, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School Sep 1998

Vol. 49, No. 1, September 3, 1998, University Of Michigan Law School

Res Gestae

•Cook Lecture Slated for Sept. 8 •New School Year Brings New Visiting and Adjunct Faculty •Administrative Landscape Altered •Rhymes of Reason •Welcome Back! Well, back, anyway… •Interviewing? Can't Go Wrong With Our Sound Advice… •Who? •Excuses •Pleas


A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman Aug 1998

A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman

Michigan Law Review

The University of Michigan Law School was ninety-five years old when Ted St. Antoine first entered Hutchins Hall in 1951. In half as many years, he profoundly influenced the institution, its traditions, and its character. Ted came west to Michigan after studying philosophy and theology at Fordham College in New York City. He came with the proven abilities of a summa cum laude. He came ready to engage what he considered a more practical challenge: he wanted to become a lawyer.


Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron Aug 1998

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron

Michigan Law Review

In seeking to encompass the many facets of Ted St. Antoine's complex life and career, one thinks of other persons to whom he can be compared. John Maynard Keynes comes immediately to mind. Although Ted may never attain the worldwide renown and influence of the great British economist, the two men share several significant traits. Like Keynes, St. Antoine is an internationally prominent and respected scholar in his own field. Like him, also, Ted is a bon vivant and a lover of the arts. He can generally be relied upon for information about the best places to eat, especially ...


Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards Aug 1998

Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards

Michigan Law Review

Ted St. Antoine's career as a law professor started more than three decades ago, in 1965, just after I had graduated from the University of Michigan Law School. I never had the good fortune to experience Ted in the classroom and I have always regretted that, for he has been a legendary teacher at the University of Michigan Law School. Indeed, even among those of us who graduated before his arrival at Michigan, Ted quickly gained a reputation as one of the finest classroom teachers ever to deliver a lecture in Hutchins Hall. He has graced his classes with ...


Recent Books, Michigan Law Review Aug 1998

Recent Books, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A list of books recently received by the Michigan Law Review.


Law Of Nations In Cyberspace: Fashioning A Cause Of Action For The Supression Of Human Rights Reports On The Internet , Thomas Cochrane Jun 1998

Law Of Nations In Cyberspace: Fashioning A Cause Of Action For The Supression Of Human Rights Reports On The Internet , Thomas Cochrane

Michigan Telecommunications & Technology Law Review

For nearly two decades, two U.S. statutes have provided redress to victims of human rights abuses: the Alien Tort Statute and the Torture Victim Protection Act. A handful of plaintiffs have recovered under these laws against foreign perpetrators of a narrow range of human rights violations. The growth and proliferation of communications technology raises important questions about how these statutes will be used in the future. Human rights activists have discovered that they can instantly communicate over the Internet with supporters and news media anywhere in the world. Repressive regimes have responded by attempting to restrict such communications. Could ...