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Full-Text Articles in Law

The Walz Decision: More On The Religion Clauses Of The First Amendment, Paul G. Kauper Dec 1970

The Walz Decision: More On The Religion Clauses Of The First Amendment, Paul G. Kauper

Michigan Law Review

The principal thrust of this Article is to determine the contribution made by the Walz decision to the body of ideas that has been developed by the Court in its application of the interdependent free exercise and establishment limitations of the first amendment, to point up any distinctively new emphases, and to suggest the implications of these new ideas and emphases for important cases coming before the Court at its 1970-1971 term.


A Requiem For Requiems: The Supreme Court At The Bar Of Reality, Stanley K. Laughlin Jr. Jun 1970

A Requiem For Requiems: The Supreme Court At The Bar Of Reality, Stanley K. Laughlin Jr.

Michigan Law Review

It is true that the test set out in Roth v. United States is moribund. In a sense it was stillborn. While five Justices, only one of whom remains on the Court, joined in the majority opinion in Roth, that case only adumbrated certain considerations that later were forged into what has come to be known as the Roth test. No sooner did the forging process begin than the Court became fragmented on this issue, and a majority of the Justices has never since concurred in the test-certainly not in a compatible formulation of it. Today, it is not clear ...


Egalitarianism And The Warren Court, Philip B. Kurland Mar 1970

Egalitarianism And The Warren Court, Philip B. Kurland

Michigan Law Review

As late as 1966, an English philosopher could say that the word "equality," unlike the words "freedom," "liberty," and "justice," was not a "value word" but only a descriptive one. He was not denigrating the term or the concept. He was saying that "when people talk about equality in a political or moral context what they really mean to talk about is some closely evaluative concept, such as impartiality or justice." What may have been true in England in 1966 was only partially true in the United States. While the word "equality" may still be used here to invoke other ...


Massachusetts In The Federal Courts: The Constitutionality Of The Vietnam War, Anthony A. D'Amato Jan 1970

Massachusetts In The Federal Courts: The Constitutionality Of The Vietnam War, Anthony A. D'Amato

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

One of the most singular pieces of legislation in American constitutional history passed both houses of the Massachusetts legislature on April 1st, 1970, and was signed into law on the following day by Governor Francis W. Sargent. It provides that, except for an emergency, no inhabitant of Massachusetts inducted into or serving in the armed forces "shall be required to serve" abroad in an armed hostility that has not been declared a war by Congress under Article 1, Section 8, clause 11 of the United States Constitution. The bill further directs the state's attorney general to bring a suit ...