Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 61 - 73 of 73

Full-Text Articles in Law

Eric Stein, William W. Bishop Jr. May 1984

Eric Stein, William W. Bishop Jr.

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Eric Stein


Eric Stein -- A Tribute, Joseph H.H. Weiler May 1984

Eric Stein -- A Tribute, Joseph H.H. Weiler

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Eric Stein


Frank R. Kennedy, James J. White Nov 1983

Frank R. Kennedy, James J. White

Articles

In an academic world thickly populated with persons of unlimited ego but of limited scholarly output, Frank Kennedy stands out as a remarkable exception. On the one hand he is the author of scholarly writings too numerous to recount; on the other he is a man of deep humility. A reader or listener soon learns he has strong views which he states with power and precision. Yet his humility is such that he will listen patiently to the most idiotic view of a colleague or student and will kindly help them find their way.


Frank R. Kennedy, George Brody Nov 1983

Frank R. Kennedy, George Brody

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Frank R. Kennedy


Frank R. Kennedy, Vern Countryman Nov 1983

Frank R. Kennedy, Vern Countryman

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Frank R. Kennedy


Frank R. Kennedy, Harold Marsh Jr. Nov 1983

Frank R. Kennedy, Harold Marsh Jr.

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Frank R. Kennedy


Frank R. Kennedy, Lawrence K. Snider Nov 1983

Frank R. Kennedy, Lawrence K. Snider

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Frank R. Kennedy


Alfred F. Conard And Allan F. Smith, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1981

Alfred F. Conard And Allan F. Smith, Terrance Sandalow

Other Publications

I am delighted to be able to participate in honoring Al Conard and Allan Smith, but I confess that I am puzzled as to why I have been invited to speak. I have not had either as a teacher. Moreover, their scholarly contributions are sufficiently removed from my areas of interest that I cannot evaluate the importance of their work. Nor was I in a good position to observe Allan's service as Dean or as Vice President for Academic Affairs.


Fred E. Inbau: 'The Importance Of Being Guilty', Yale Kamisar Jan 1977

Fred E. Inbau: 'The Importance Of Being Guilty', Yale Kamisar

Articles

As fate would have it, Fred Inbau graduated from law school in 1932, the very year that, "for practical purposes the modern law of constitutional criminal procedure [began], with the decision in the great case of Powell v. Alabama."1 In "the 'stone age' of American criminal procedure,"2 Inbau began his long fight to shape or to retain rules that "make sense in the light of a policeman's task,"3 more aware than most that so long as the rules do so, "we will be in a stronger position to insist that [the officer] obey them."4


Professor Bishop's Contributions To International Law, Brunson Macchesney Apr 1976

Professor Bishop's Contributions To International Law, Brunson Macchesney

Michigan Law Review

A Tribute to William W. Bishop, Jr.


Dean Lockhart, The Man., Yale Kamisar, Jesse H. Choper Jan 1972

Dean Lockhart, The Man., Yale Kamisar, Jesse H. Choper

Articles

Bill Lockhart is truly an extraordinary man, not because his achievements have been so numerous and diverse - though they have - and not because his accomplishments carry a distinct mark of excellence and eminence - though they do. He is unusual because he is that combination of multiple gifts and powers rarely coalesced in a single human being. And we have spoken merely of the professional man; only those familiar with Bill's deep devotion to his family and heroic dedication to his church can fully comprehend how remarkable a person he is.


Jefferson B. Fordham: His Contribution To Local Government Law, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1970

Jefferson B. Fordham: His Contribution To Local Government Law, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

The study of local government has not, by and large, attracted and held the interest of the ablest minds in the legal profession. Much of the same has been true within economics and political science, the social sciences from which lawyers might have anticipated most assistance in designing legal institutions to cope with the problems of an urban nation. Lawyers who have come to the area during the past decade have not, in consequence, had the advantages of a strong intellectual tradition upon which to build in the effort to understand and to come to grips with current problems.


Thomas Mcintyre Cooley, Harry B. Hutchins Jan 1906

Thomas Mcintyre Cooley, Harry B. Hutchins

Articles

The Department of Law of the University was opened in the fall of 1859. The wisdom of the step was doubted by many, and it cannot be said to have had the hearty support of the profession of the State. Systematic legal education through the instrumentality of formal instruction was in its infancy. It was practically unknown in the west, for outside of New England and New York there was at the time no law school of standing and influence. The profession generally, the country over, had little sympathy with any method of training for the bar excepting the historic ...