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Full-Text Articles in Law

In Memoriam: John Reed, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jun 2018

In Memoriam: John Reed, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to John W. Reed.


John Henry Wigmore, Richard D. Friedman Jan 2009

John Henry Wigmore, Richard D. Friedman

Book Chapters

Wigmore, John Henry (1863-1943). Law professor and dean. Wigmore was born and reared in San Francisco. His parents were both immigrants, his mother from England and his father, of English heritage, from Ireland. Harry, as he was known familiarly, was the oldest and most favored of his extraordinarily doting mother's seven children. The family was prosperous - his father had an importing business - and Harry was educated principally in private schools. He then attended Harvard College, prompting the mother to move the family to Massachusetts to be close to him. After graduating in 1883, he spent a brief interlude in ...


Frank Allen: An Appreciation, Richard Lempert Dec 2008

Frank Allen: An Appreciation, Richard Lempert

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Francis Allen was the Dean who hired me. First deans are, in their own way, as memorable as first kisses; they set expectations for all that follows. The expectations that Frank Allen set were high indeed. In this young professor's mind (I was 24 when I received my offer; 25 when I joined the faculty) he embodied what I still regard as the two most important academic virtues: scholarship and decency. These virtues combined to make him, at the time he accepted the Michigan deanship, perhaps the nation's most powerful voice for criminal justice reform and the country ...


Francis A. Allen--Dean And Colleague, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2008

Francis A. Allen--Dean And Colleague, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Frank Allen was chosen as Dean at Michigan during my first year on the Law School faculty. I had never met him but my colleagues had provided splendid reports about his work and about him personally. I was also impressed by his response to our inquiry concerning his possible interest in the deanship. He said he had established a couple of conditions for being a dean anywhere. First, it would have to be at a school to which he felt a special attachment. Second, it would have to be at an institution where he felt he could make some particular ...


Dedicated To The Memory Of Lee E. Teiteitelbaum, Carl E. Schneider Nov 2004

Dedicated To The Memory Of Lee E. Teiteitelbaum, Carl E. Schneider

Articles

When I first met Lee Teitelbaum at a conference two decades ago, I was a novice and he a distinguished scholar. Because my colleagues admired him, I rang his room at the hotel and asked him to join me for dinner. He sweetly agreed. When he opened his door to my knock, I realized that he set standards I could never match-sartorial standards. Who was this king of glory? 1 stood there in my Oshkosh khakis and running shoes, agape and abashed. Despite this unpropitious start, our friendship ripened, and soon I realized Lee set standards of a finer and ...


A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman Aug 1998

A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman

Michigan Law Review

The University of Michigan Law School was ninety-five years old when Ted St. Antoine first entered Hutchins Hall in 1951. In half as many years, he profoundly influenced the institution, its traditions, and its character. Ted came west to Michigan after studying philosophy and theology at Fordham College in New York City. He came with the proven abilities of a summa cum laude. He came ready to engage what he considered a more practical challenge: he wanted to become a lawyer.


Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards Aug 1998

Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards

Michigan Law Review

Ted St. Antoine's career as a law professor started more than three decades ago, in 1965, just after I had graduated from the University of Michigan Law School. I never had the good fortune to experience Ted in the classroom and I have always regretted that, for he has been a legendary teacher at the University of Michigan Law School. Indeed, even among those of us who graduated before his arrival at Michigan, Ted quickly gained a reputation as one of the finest classroom teachers ever to deliver a lecture in Hutchins Hall. He has graced his classes with ...


Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron Aug 1998

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron

Michigan Law Review

In seeking to encompass the many facets of Ted St. Antoine's complex life and career, one thinks of other persons to whom he can be compared. John Maynard Keynes comes immediately to mind. Although Ted may never attain the worldwide renown and influence of the great British economist, the two men share several significant traits. Like Keynes, St. Antoine is an internationally prominent and respected scholar in his own field. Like him, also, Ted is a bon vivant and a lover of the arts. He can generally be relied upon for information about the best places to eat, especially ...


Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1998

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

Ted's skills as a negotiator and mediator and the soundness of his judgment played a vitally important role not only in bringing the issues to a happy conclusion, but in doing so in a way that held the faculty together during a difficult time. Those qualities, together with universal respect for his integrity and confidence that he would not pursue an agenda different from its own, have repeatedly led the faculty to turn to Ted, initially to become its Dean and later to handle a variety of other sensitive assignments.


In Appreciation Of Ted St. Antoine, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1998

In Appreciation Of Ted St. Antoine, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

As I began to think of what I might say this evening, it occurred to me that I was fortunate the occasion had not been billed as a roast. It would not be easy - and, indeed, might be sacrilegious - to direct attention to the foibles of a man whom thousands call "the Saint." That title, by which he has been known by generations of students, is, of course, a measure of their affection and their esteem for him. For more than three decades, Ted has been one of our most popular teachers. Although I have learned a great deal from ...


William J. Pierce, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1991

William J. Pierce, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Bill Pierce gets things done. When I became Dean of this Law School in mid-1971, Bill had already been on the job as Associate Dean for several months. My predecessor, Frank Allen, upon learning that Bill would be my choice for that position, had decided to appoint him immediately. There was no sense, Frank explained, in postponing the opportunity for the Law School to take advantage of Bill's formidable practical talents. I soon learned what that meant.


John W. Reed And The High Style, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jun 1987

John W. Reed And The High Style, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

John Reed is the Fred Astaire of the law school world. That doesn't mean John would win prizes for his waltzing and tangoing; the kinship runs much deeper. There is the same purity of line in gesture and speech, the same trimness of content and grace of expression, and the same ineffable talent for brightening up a scene just by entering it.


John W. Reed, Douglas W. Hillman Jun 1987

John W. Reed, Douglas W. Hillman

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to John W. Reed


John W. Reed, James K. Robinson Jun 1987

John W. Reed, James K. Robinson

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to John W. Reed


John W. Reed, Austin G. Anderson Jun 1987

John W. Reed, Austin G. Anderson

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to John W. Reed


John W. Reed, Wilbert J. Mckeachie Jun 1987

John W. Reed, Wilbert J. Mckeachie

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to John W. Reed


John W. Reed And The High Style, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1987

John W. Reed And The High Style, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

John Reed is the Fred Astaire of the law school world. That doesn't mean John would win prizes for his waltzing and tangoing; the kinship runs much deeper. There is the same purity of line in gesture and speech, the same trimness of content and grace of expression, and the same ineffable talent for brightening up a scene just by entering it. John certainly brightened up the law school days for this former student, a generation or so ago. We jaded upperclass people actually looked forward to John's Evidence classes, and he seldom if ever let us down ...


Francis A. Allen, Norval Morris Dec 1986

Francis A. Allen, Norval Morris

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Francis A. Allen


E.F. Hutton Goes South, Franklin E. Zimring Dec 1986

E.F. Hutton Goes South, Franklin E. Zimring

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Francis A. Allen


Being Frank About The Fourth: On Allen's "Process Of 'Factualization' In The Search And Seizure Cases", Wayne R. Lafave Dec 1986

Being Frank About The Fourth: On Allen's "Process Of 'Factualization' In The Search And Seizure Cases", Wayne R. Lafave

Michigan Law Review

An invitation to participate in a special issue for such an inestimable personage as Francis Allen is itself a distinct honor - so much so, in fact, that refusal seems out of the question no matter what risks may attend this undertaking. The principal risk, as I see it, is that if one's contribution were to be assessed by a reader who, by virtue of this collection of essays, was also reflecting upon the writings of Allen, one is bound to come out the loser in any comparison. But I assume this risk, as substantial as it doubtless is in ...


Francis A. Allen: Resolution Of The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Michigan, The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Michigan Dec 1986

Francis A. Allen: Resolution Of The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Michigan, The Board Of Regents Of The University Of Michigan

Michigan Law Review

Francis Allen has had a long and distinguished career, rich with service to his students, to the academic community, and to the nation. In grateful recognition of his many contributions while a member of the University faculty, the Regents salute this distinguished scholar and educator by naming him Edson R. Sunderland Professor of Law Emeritus.


What Frank Allen Teaches, Robert A. Burt Dec 1986

What Frank Allen Teaches, Robert A. Burt

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Francis A. Allen


Francis A. Allen, Terrance Sandalow Dec 1986

Francis A. Allen, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

Writing a brief tribute to Frank Allen, a man I admire as much as any I have known, should have been easy and pleasurable. It has proved to be very difficult. The initial difficulty is the occasion for the tribute. Frank's decision to take early retirement from the University and to resettle in a warmer climate deprives the Sandalows of frequent contact with two of our favorite people. The act of writing requires an acceptance of that loss that I have not yet achieved. A second difficulty is that Frank has been an important influence in my life for ...


Francis A. Allen --An Appreciation, Sanford H. Kadish Dec 1986

Francis A. Allen --An Appreciation, Sanford H. Kadish

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Francis A. Allen


Alfred F. Conard And Allan F. Smith, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1981

Alfred F. Conard And Allan F. Smith, Terrance Sandalow

Other Publications

I am delighted to be able to participate in honoring Al Conard and Allan Smith, but I confess that I am puzzled as to why I have been invited to speak. I have not had either as a teacher. Moreover, their scholarly contributions are sufficiently removed from my areas of interest that I cannot evaluate the importance of their work. Nor was I in a good position to observe Allan's service as Dean or as Vice President for Academic Affairs.


Allan Smith, Robben W. Fleming Jan 1981

Allan Smith, Robben W. Fleming

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Allan Smith


Allan Smith--A Personal History, Lawrence B. Lindemer Jan 1981

Allan Smith--A Personal History, Lawrence B. Lindemer

Michigan Law Review

A tribute to Allan Smith


Allan F. Smith—My 'Dean For A Day', Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1981

Allan F. Smith—My 'Dean For A Day', Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

It has been my good fortune to have served in more different roles in relation to Allan Smith than has any other person in this Law School. I was his student here longer ago than either of us would care to calculate. A decade and a half ago he recruited me for this faculty when he was Dean. Although the prospect of working closely with Allan had a good deal to do with my decision to leave active practice for teaching, that was not to be. The first morning of my return to Ann Arbor, I remember plugging in my ...


A Colleague's Tribute, James J. White Jan 1980

A Colleague's Tribute, James J. White

Articles

This piece was published as a dedication to Dean Richard E. Speidel. In describing Dick Speidel's character and scholarship one is tempted to use the adjectives that are now a fixed part of the Decanal resignation ritual. Whatever their vices in office, retiring Deans are invariably "bright, insightful, generous, scholarly, worldly;" occasionally they are persons of "unbounded administrative skill," and even of "unlimited scholastic vision."


Memorial Resolution: E. Blythe Stason, Michigan Law Review Jan 1973

Memorial Resolution: E. Blythe Stason, Michigan Law Review

Michigan Law Review

A Tribute to E. Blythe Stason