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Yale Kamisar The Teacher, Jeffrey S. Lehman Jan 2004

Yale Kamisar The Teacher, Jeffrey S. Lehman

Michigan Law Review

I first heard Yale Kamisar's name in the spring of 1977 while deciding where to go to law school. The then Dean of Admissions at Michigan suggested I call a graduate practicing law near me in upstate New York. The graduate eloquently endorsed Michigan. But what impressed me most was his statement, "When you go to Michigan you must be sure to take a course from a professor named Yale Kamisar. That course changed the way I thought about law. Every day we'd go to class and talk about interesting cases and I was always confused. But at ...


Saying Goodbye To A Legend: A Tribute To Yale Kamisar - My Mentor, Teacher, And Friend, Eve Brensike Primus Jan 2004

Saying Goodbye To A Legend: A Tribute To Yale Kamisar - My Mentor, Teacher, And Friend, Eve Brensike Primus

Michigan Law Review

I remember it as though it was yesterday - dozens of students filing into Hutchins Hall for their first criminal procedure class. The legendary Yale Kamisar walked briskly to the front of the room, his upper body moving first slightly forward and then ever so slightly backward in almost a rocking manner. He carried nothing except for a two-inch black notebook, tattered at the edges and marked with brightly colored tabs protruding from each page. Paying no attention to the hundreds of eyes fixed on his every move, he dropped the notebook on the podium, stepped up to the blackboard, and ...


Inspiring Generations, Nancy J. King Jan 2004

Inspiring Generations, Nancy J. King

Michigan Law Review

It is difficult to imagine Michigan Law School without Yale Kamisar. He seems as much a part of the place as the Reading Room, the heavy oak doors, and the sounds of the marching band practicing, the steam heaters knocking, and the footsteps on the stone floors. That Michigan students will no longer experience his inspiration and guidance in person is sad, but inevitable. Fortunately, law students everywhere, and the law that they have learned to love, will never escape his influence. The editors of this issue have encouraged us to relate our own experiences with Yale. Mine started long ...


Yale Kamisar: The Enemy Of Injustice, Welsh S. White Jan 2004

Yale Kamisar: The Enemy Of Injustice, Welsh S. White

Michigan Law Review

In the summer of 1978, Duke Law School hosted a conference in which a variety of speakers offered perspectives on Constitutional Criminal Procedure. One of the speakers argued that the Warren Court's criminal-procedure revolution created a backlash that ultimately made things worse for criminal defendants. In order to dramatize his point, he suggested, "Yale Kamisar is the enemy." When that speaker had finished, the Conference Moderator began his response by stating, "First of all, Yale Kamisar is not the enemy of anything, except injustice."


Tribute To Yale Kamisar, Ruth Bader Ginsburg Jan 2004

Tribute To Yale Kamisar, Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Michigan Law Review

When the editors of this issue told me of Professor Yale Kamisar's decision to retire from full-time teaching after a near half century of law faculty service, two thoughts came immediately to mind. First, I thought of the large loss to Michigan students unable to attend his classes and to faculty colleagues at Ann Arbor unable routinely to engage his bright mind. Second, I thought it altogether right for the Michigan Law Review to publish an issue honoring one of the Law School's most prized professors. When invited to write a tribute, I could not resist saying yes.


If History Mattered: John Marshall And Reframing The Constitution, Aviam Soifer May 2003

If History Mattered: John Marshall And Reframing The Constitution, Aviam Soifer

Michigan Law Review

What more can there be to learn about John Marshall? We have been blessed recently with a flood of fine books about Marshall and the Supreme Court over which he presided from 1801 until 1835. We also now have readily available an impressive collection of documents concerning the Court before Marshall, as well as a fine series collecting, introducing, and annotating Marshall's papers. With recent bicentennial celebrations marking the beginning of Marshall's career as Chief Justice and the anniversary of Marbury v. Madison, an outpouring of law review articles and scholarly symposia have offered learned exchanges about the ...


The Politicization Of Clarence Thomas, Jagan Nicholas Ranjan May 2003

The Politicization Of Clarence Thomas, Jagan Nicholas Ranjan

Michigan Law Review

Perception often shapes memory. In particular, the way one perceives a noteworthy public figure often shapes that figure's historical legacy. For example, history largely remembers John Coltrane as one of the greatest jazz saxophone players of our time. His improvisational skill, innovative style, and mastery over his instrument all serve to classify him in the public memory as the ultimate jazz performer. Yet, as the example of Coltrane might demonstrate, perception is unjustly deficient. Coltrane was not merely a great saxophone player; he was first and foremost a religious figure whose spirituality drove his creativity and manifested itself in ...


Justices At Home: Three Supreme Court Memoirs, Laura Krugman Ray May 2003

Justices At Home: Three Supreme Court Memoirs, Laura Krugman Ray

Michigan Law Review

The Supreme Court, once an austere and remote institution, is increasingly the focus of popular attention. The Justices are profiled in the New York Times Magazine and the New Yorker, photographed with family members for mass-market books, and - on the evening the Court decided Bush v. Gore - televised leaving the courthouse parking garage. In the spring 2002 television season, two hour-long programs were set in the Supreme Court; both were briskly cancelled, but during their brief runs they featured Justices as heroic figures played by prominent actors. When a former law clerk recently published his account of internecine warfare on ...


Poverty And Equality: A Distant Mirror, Gene R. Nichol Jan 2002

Poverty And Equality: A Distant Mirror, Gene R. Nichol

Michigan Law Review

In one sense, Joel Schwartz's new effort, Fighting Poverty with Virtue, is tremendously timely. Bill Clinton's Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 was designed to "end welfare as we know it," turning greater attention to poor people's habits than to their pocketbooks. George Bush's compassionate conservatism is meant to pick up the pace, overtly seeking "to save and change lives." The White House's ominously entitled "Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives" is apparently set to unleash new waves of moral reformers. Schwartz's book seeks to provide moral, philosophical and historical sustenance ...


Horrible Holmes, Mathias Reimann Jan 2002

Horrible Holmes, Mathias Reimann

Michigan Law Review

Holmes has kept scholars busy for most of a century, and the resulting volume of literature about him is staggering. In that last twenty years along, we have been blessed with four biographies, four symposia, three new collections of his works, two volumes of essays, and various monographs, not to mention a multitude of free-standing law review articles. Since life is short, everyone who adds to the deluge, including Albert Alschuler with his new book, bears a heavy responsibility to make the expenditure of trees, library space, and reading time worthwhile. Does Law Without Values fulfill that responsibility? Despite the ...


High Brow, Lee C. Bollinger Aug 2001

High Brow, Lee C. Bollinger

Michigan Law Review

Terry Sandalow has an extraordinary mind, its power suggested by his incredible brow and forehead. (I'm always reminded, in fact, of Melville's description of the massive size of the sperm whale's head as representing its huge intelligence.) By any measure, Terry is very smart, broadly educated, and deeply sensitive to the nuances of life. From my earliest days on the law faculty, I remember being continually impressed, at faculty discussions and seminars, by his illuminating questions and comments and aware of his reputation among students as one of the most intellectually challenging teachers. Colleagues routinely sought his ...


Terry Sandalow: Mind And Man, Francis A. Allen Aug 2001

Terry Sandalow: Mind And Man, Francis A. Allen

Michigan Law Review

My first encounter with Terry Sandalow occurred in a classroom at the University of Chicago in the fall of 1956. I had just joined that faculty, and Terry, a third-year student, was a member of my class in constitutional law. Early in the course I called on Terry to state the case that was the subject of the morning's discussion. He replied that he had not been able to read the assignment prior to class. The response did not come as a complete surprise since I was dimly aware that he was a member of the law review staff ...


The Teachings Of Professor Sandalow, David Westin Aug 2001

The Teachings Of Professor Sandalow, David Westin

Michigan Law Review

Some courses you took at Michigan Law School because they were required. Some you took just because they sounded interesting. Some you thought were somehow related to what you expected to be doing after graduation. And then there was Federal Courts and the Federal System, taught by Professor Terry Sandalow. That course you took as a challenge - because it was there, and you knew that if you did not take it, you would always wonder how you would have done. I took the challenge in the Fall of 1977. I worked hard and thrived on the experience. For my efforts ...


"An Eye Single For Righteousness", Mark Sidel May 2001

"An Eye Single For Righteousness", Mark Sidel

Michigan Law Review

In an era in which American internationalism has once again met American empire on the field of law and politics, Henry Wallace's life and work are instructive. Wallace, one of the great internationalists of his era, was Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of Commerce, Vice President under Franklin D. Roosevelt, the 1948 presidential nominee of the Progressive Party, and founder of Pioneer Hy-Bred, for decades the world's dominant hybrid seed company (pp. 82, 90). John Culver and John Hyde's new biography of Wallace brings this life before a newer generation of Americans concerned with America's place in ...


A Model Judicial Biography, Gerald Gunther May 1999

A Model Judicial Biography, Gerald Gunther

Michigan Law Review

I have long been a fan of the Michigan Law Review's annual book review issue. I was therefore particularly delighted to read the Introduction to last year's issue, the twentieth anniversary of this ingenious and, I think, unique law review format. Michigan professor Carl Schneider wrote that opening piece. Schneider brought excellent credentials to the writing of his witty and thoughtful essay: he was Editor-in-Chief of the Law Review twenty years ago, and thus present at the creation of the book review issue. His thoughtful Introduction states, accurately I believe, that the book review issue "is the best ...


Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron Aug 1998

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron

Michigan Law Review

In seeking to encompass the many facets of Ted St. Antoine's complex life and career, one thinks of other persons to whom he can be compared. John Maynard Keynes comes immediately to mind. Although Ted may never attain the worldwide renown and influence of the great British economist, the two men share several significant traits. Like Keynes, St. Antoine is an internationally prominent and respected scholar in his own field. Like him, also, Ted is a bon vivant and a lover of the arts. He can generally be relied upon for information about the best places to eat, especially ...


A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman Aug 1998

A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman

Michigan Law Review

The University of Michigan Law School was ninety-five years old when Ted St. Antoine first entered Hutchins Hall in 1951. In half as many years, he profoundly influenced the institution, its traditions, and its character. Ted came west to Michigan after studying philosophy and theology at Fordham College in New York City. He came with the proven abilities of a summa cum laude. He came ready to engage what he considered a more practical challenge: he wanted to become a lawyer.


Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards Aug 1998

Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards

Michigan Law Review

Ted St. Antoine's career as a law professor started more than three decades ago, in 1965, just after I had graduated from the University of Michigan Law School. I never had the good fortune to experience Ted in the classroom and I have always regretted that, for he has been a legendary teacher at the University of Michigan Law School. Indeed, even among those of us who graduated before his arrival at Michigan, Ted quickly gained a reputation as one of the finest classroom teachers ever to deliver a lecture in Hutchins Hall. He has graced his classes with ...


Lessons From The Fall, Andrea D. Lyon May 1998

Lessons From The Fall, Andrea D. Lyon

Michigan Law Review

This book is both better and worse than one would expect. It is the story of Sol Wachtler, former Chief Judge of New York State Court of Appeals. Wachtler had an extramarital affair with a woman for whom he had been appointed executor, and after the breakup he stalked her with letters, phone calls, and threats. Eventually he was convicted of extortion and sent to prison. His fall from power is what fascinates us, of course, but that is not what is valuable about this book. It answers an outsider's questions about the prison experience, seems to reflect accurately ...


Character, Conscience, And Destiny, G. Gordon Liddy May 1998

Character, Conscience, And Destiny, G. Gordon Liddy

Michigan Law Review

In authoring the definitive biography of Archibald Cox, Professor Ken Gormley has also favored us with a study of character, its formation, and its effect upon history. What is more, he has demonstrated once again that while events may present men with opportunity, men make history and not vice versa. Into the bargain, Mr. Gormley offers yet more proof of the correctness of Heraclitus's dictum, "character is destiny." As the author is human, the book has its faults. They range from the mere erroneous use of language (misusing "smells" for "odors" (pp. 59, 307), misusing "anxious" for "eager" (p ...


Holmes' Failure, Louise Weinberg Dec 1997

Holmes' Failure, Louise Weinberg

Michigan Law Review

I have just set down the March 1997 Harvard Law Review, with its centennial celebration of Oliver Wendell Holmes' The Path of the Law. The Path of the Law is a grand thing, in my view Holmes' best thing. But just the same, I find myself surprised that on this occasion none of its celebrants raised what has always seemed to me a weakness of the piece, and of Holmes' much earlier book, The Common Law. This is a weakness that is at once a reflection and a forecast of the failure of its author. Writers today do seem to ...


A Tribute To Jerry Israel: A Friend With A Messy Office, Debra Ann Livingston Aug 1996

A Tribute To Jerry Israel: A Friend With A Messy Office, Debra Ann Livingston

Michigan Law Review

A Tribute to Jerry Israel


Tribute To Jerry Israel, Jeffrey S. Lehman Aug 1996

Tribute To Jerry Israel, Jeffrey S. Lehman

Michigan Law Review

A Tribute to Jerry Israel


Random Thoughts By A Distant Collaborator, Wayne R. Lafave Aug 1996

Random Thoughts By A Distant Collaborator, Wayne R. Lafave

Michigan Law Review

A Tribute to Jerry Israel


A Tribute To Professor Jerold Israel--My Teacher, My Co-Author, My Good Friend, Paul D. Borman Aug 1996

A Tribute To Professor Jerold Israel--My Teacher, My Co-Author, My Good Friend, Paul D. Borman

Michigan Law Review

A Tribute to Jerry Israel


Dream Makers: Black Judges On Justice, Julian Abele Cook Jr. May 1996

Dream Makers: Black Judges On Justice, Julian Abele Cook Jr.

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Linn Washington, Black Judges on Justice


A Modern Hamlet In The Judicial Pantheon, Charles Alan Wright May 1995

A Modern Hamlet In The Judicial Pantheon, Charles Alan Wright

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Learned Hand: The Man and the Judge by Gerald Gunther


Justice Lewis F. Powell And The Jurisprudence Of Centrism, Mark Tushnet May 1995

Justice Lewis F. Powell And The Jurisprudence Of Centrism, Mark Tushnet

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Justice Lewis F. Powell, Jr by John C. Jeffries, Jr.


Hugo Black Among Friends, Dennis J. Hutchinson May 1995

Hugo Black Among Friends, Dennis J. Hutchinson

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Hugo Black: A Biography by Roger K. Newman


Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes: Law And The Inner Self, Michael A. Carrier May 1995

Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes: Law And The Inner Self, Michael A. Carrier

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes: Law and the Inner Self by G. Edward White