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Full-Text Articles in Law

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron Aug 1998

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Benjamin Aaron

Michigan Law Review

In seeking to encompass the many facets of Ted St. Antoine's complex life and career, one thinks of other persons to whom he can be compared. John Maynard Keynes comes immediately to mind. Although Ted may never attain the worldwide renown and influence of the great British economist, the two men share several significant traits. Like Keynes, St. Antoine is an internationally prominent and respected scholar in his own field. Like him, also, Ted is a bon vivant and a lover of the arts. He can generally be relied upon for information about the best places to eat, especially ...


A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman Aug 1998

A Tribute To Theodore J. St. Antoine, Jeffrey S. Lehman

Michigan Law Review

The University of Michigan Law School was ninety-five years old when Ted St. Antoine first entered Hutchins Hall in 1951. In half as many years, he profoundly influenced the institution, its traditions, and its character. Ted came west to Michigan after studying philosophy and theology at Fordham College in New York City. He came with the proven abilities of a summa cum laude. He came ready to engage what he considered a more practical challenge: he wanted to become a lawyer.


Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards Aug 1998

Professor Theodore J. St. Antoine: A Legendary Figure, Harry T. Edwards

Michigan Law Review

Ted St. Antoine's career as a law professor started more than three decades ago, in 1965, just after I had graduated from the University of Michigan Law School. I never had the good fortune to experience Ted in the classroom and I have always regretted that, for he has been a legendary teacher at the University of Michigan Law School. Indeed, even among those of us who graduated before his arrival at Michigan, Ted quickly gained a reputation as one of the finest classroom teachers ever to deliver a lecture in Hutchins Hall. He has graced his classes with ...


Lessons From The Fall, Andrea D. Lyon May 1998

Lessons From The Fall, Andrea D. Lyon

Michigan Law Review

This book is both better and worse than one would expect. It is the story of Sol Wachtler, former Chief Judge of New York State Court of Appeals. Wachtler had an extramarital affair with a woman for whom he had been appointed executor, and after the breakup he stalked her with letters, phone calls, and threats. Eventually he was convicted of extortion and sent to prison. His fall from power is what fascinates us, of course, but that is not what is valuable about this book. It answers an outsider's questions about the prison experience, seems to reflect accurately ...


Character, Conscience, And Destiny, G. Gordon Liddy May 1998

Character, Conscience, And Destiny, G. Gordon Liddy

Michigan Law Review

In authoring the definitive biography of Archibald Cox, Professor Ken Gormley has also favored us with a study of character, its formation, and its effect upon history. What is more, he has demonstrated once again that while events may present men with opportunity, men make history and not vice versa. Into the bargain, Mr. Gormley offers yet more proof of the correctness of Heraclitus's dictum, "character is destiny." As the author is human, the book has its faults. They range from the mere erroneous use of language (misusing "smells" for "odors" (pp. 59, 307), misusing "anxious" for "eager" (p ...