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University of Michigan Law School

Land Use Law

Police power

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Reconciling Police Power Prerogatives, Public Trust Interests, And Private Property Rights Along Laurentian Great Lakes Shores, Richard K. Norton, Nancy H. Welsh May 2019

Reconciling Police Power Prerogatives, Public Trust Interests, And Private Property Rights Along Laurentian Great Lakes Shores, Richard K. Norton, Nancy H. Welsh

Michigan Journal of Environmental & Administrative Law

The United States has a north coast along its ‘inland seas’—the Laurentian Great Lakes. The country enjoys more than 4,500 miles of Great Lakes coastal shoreline, almost as much as its ocean coastal shorelines combined, excluding Alaska. The Great Lakes states are experiencing continued shorefront development and redevelopment, and there are growing calls to better manage shorelands for enhanced resiliency in the face of global climate change. The problem is that the most pleasant, fragile, and dangerous places are in high demand among coastal property owners, such that coastal development often yields the most tenacious of conflicts between ...


Billboard Control Under The Highway Beautification Act Of 1965, Roger A. Cunningham Jun 1973

Billboard Control Under The Highway Beautification Act Of 1965, Roger A. Cunningham

Michigan Law Review

Although the advertising control provisions of the Highway Beautification Act of 1965 have been the subject of unremitting controversy from the date of enactment until the present time, only three substantive amendments to title I have been adopted in the intervening years. These are the amendments to subsections ( d) and (j) and the addition of a new subsection (n) all of which were adopted in 1968.


Zoning Law In Michigan And New Jersey: A Comparative Study, Roger A. Cunningham May 1965

Zoning Law In Michigan And New Jersey: A Comparative Study, Roger A. Cunningham

Michigan Law Review

It is one thesis of this article that the "lawyer's view" has generally prevailed in Michigan and that the "planner's view" has generally prevailed in New Jersey. Since the zoning law of these two states is thus fairly representative of the opposing judicial attitudes set forth in the preceding paragraph, they are especially suitable for comparative study. This study begins with a look at the constitutional bases and statutory provisions for zoning. It then proceeds to examine judicial attitudes toward zoning determinations in general and continues by focusing on specific current zoning problems. The conclusions to be drawn ...


Zoning--Townships--Complete Exclusion Of Trailer Camps And Parks, Rolfe A. Worden S.Ed. Mar 1963

Zoning--Townships--Complete Exclusion Of Trailer Camps And Parks, Rolfe A. Worden S.Ed.

Michigan Law Review

Plaintiff challenged the validity of an amendment to the zoning ordinance of the defendant township which barred all trailer camps and parks from its industrial district. As trailer parks had previously been zoned out of the business, residential, and agricultural districts, this amendment had the effect of completely excluding them from the entire township, although approximately half of its twenty-three square miles consisted of open rural area. The parties stipulated that the plans of the plaintiff, who wanted to develop a trailer park on his premises, met all of the applicable health standards. The trial court sustained the amendment, but ...


Constitutional Law - Due Process - Zoning Restrictions Requiring Land Owners To Provide Off-Street Parking, Eldon Olson May 1960

Constitutional Law - Due Process - Zoning Restrictions Requiring Land Owners To Provide Off-Street Parking, Eldon Olson

Michigan Law Review

In 1956 the City of Denver passed an ordinance requiring land owners to provide off-street parking if and when they erect new buildings or make structural alterations or change the existing use of the land. The restriction applied to a district adjacent to the traditional downtown district which was in the process of changing from residential to commercial. The ordinance did not specify whether the property owners retained control over parking areas, but the city argued that parking could be restricted to persons using the property. Plaintiff property owners alleged the ordinance was unconstitutional and were granted a declaratory judgment ...