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Philosophy And Law: An Interpretation Of Plato's 'Minos', Steven Thomason Jan 2015

Philosophy And Law: An Interpretation Of Plato's 'Minos', Steven Thomason

Articles

Plato's Minos presents a twofold argument. In part it is a facile defense of law directed at a typical Athenian citizen. On another level, it is a sophisticated teaching that ponders the question what is law for the would-be philosopher or student of Socrates. These arguments are made in three parts. First, it becomes clear that Socrates' interlocutor has been influenced or corrupted by the teachings of sophists. Second, Socrates attempts to reform the interlocutor's opinion of law by suggesting there is a science of law. Finally, Socrates argues that present day Greek laws are derived from the ...


Law, Philosophy, And Civil Disobedience: The Laws' Speech In Plato's 'Crito', Steven Thomason Jan 2012

Law, Philosophy, And Civil Disobedience: The Laws' Speech In Plato's 'Crito', Steven Thomason

Articles

Plato's 'Crito' is an examination of the tension between political science, a life devoted to the rational discourse and the critique of politics, and the demands of allegiance and service to the city. The argument Socrates makes in the name of the laws is not just meant to persuade Crito. Rather, it is a philosophic defense of the city itself, the philosophic response to Socrates' own speech in the Apology defending philosophy. This speech reveals the dangers and problems of a life devoted to philosophy when reason is directed to politics and calls into question the values and way ...


Protecting The Past: A Comparative Study Of The Antiquities Laws In The Mid-South, Douglas L. Reed, Trey Berry Jan 2006

Protecting The Past: A Comparative Study Of The Antiquities Laws In The Mid-South, Douglas L. Reed, Trey Berry

Articles

Governmental efforts to protect antiquities can be found in the early twentieth century; however, the most significant policy efforts began in the late 1960s and early 1970s. This manuscript focuses on the properties/items protected under current statutes in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas and provides background on major federal policies. Moreover, it addresses the penalties imposed for violating these regulations. The efforts made to enforce these rules are also addressed along with suggestions for improving implementation of antiquities policies in all three states.