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Full-Text Articles in Law

A Line Made By Walking And Assembling Bits And Pieces Of The Bodywork Of Illegally Dumped Cars Found At The Edge Of Roads And Tracks In The Illawarra Escarpment (Curating Cities Database), Brogan Bunt Jan 2013

A Line Made By Walking And Assembling Bits And Pieces Of The Bodywork Of Illegally Dumped Cars Found At The Edge Of Roads And Tracks In The Illawarra Escarpment (Curating Cities Database), Brogan Bunt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

To reflect on the Illawarra culture of dumping rubbish in the local escarpment bush.

To reflect on the limited capacity of art to effectively intervene in the culture of dumping – perhaps only through doubling and complicity is anything possible?

To remediate Land Art traditions by intervening not in nature itself, but in a layer of impure addition and by deliberately avoiding the grand scale of 60’s US Land Art. The work also plays homage to the cutting works of Gordon Matta-Clark


The Surface Of Language, Madeleine T. Kelly Jan 2013

The Surface Of Language, Madeleine T. Kelly

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The roots of these paintings are fragments. Forms that appear grotesque, hollowed or as though composed of splintered fields are spliced together in oneiric landscapes. Their content and process are a sort of sabotage – deformed protagonists appear caught in the act of breaking and in turn collide with the push and pull of paint. If this is aestheticising destruction, it is only in an ironic hope to interrogate conflict that surrounds drone warfare, blind consumption and the massacre of living things.

The lines in the collection of stones exhibited here provide a surface of exchange for the intersection of language ...


Among The Machines: Australian And Nz Artists, Su Ballard Jan 2013

Among The Machines: Australian And Nz Artists, Su Ballard

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

I was lead curator and invited scholar for AMONG THE MACHINES. The exhibition included 13 artists from New Zealand and Australia including major figures. The artists are: Ruth Buchanan, Bronwyn Holloway-Smith, Hayden Fowler, Douglas Bagnall, Fiona Pardington, Nathan Pohio, Hannah and Aaron Beehre, Daniel Crooks, Ronnie Van Hout, Susan Norrie, Jae Hoon Lee, Stella Brennan and Ann Shelton. The exhibition was advertised in E-flux, Art in Australia, Art News. I was interviewed on National Radio (4th July 2013), and it has received numerous favorable reviews.


Academic Employment And Gender Equity Legislation In Australia And Japan, 1970-2010, Kirsti Rawstron Jan 2013

Academic Employment And Gender Equity Legislation In Australia And Japan, 1970-2010, Kirsti Rawstron

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the rate of change of men and women's employment as university academic staff in Australia and Japan; and, drawing on quantitative methods, show differences in the rate of change since the introduction of anti-sex discrimination legislation. The author also includes a discussion of programmes designed to increase female participation in academic positions to provide background to the existing changes.

Design/methodology/approach - Using statistics published by the Ministries of Education of both countries, a time series of female participation at each level of academic staff was constructed. Breakpoint analysis is ...


Medium-Specificity And Sociality In Expanded Cinema Re-Enactment, Lucas M. Ihlein Jan 2013

Medium-Specificity And Sociality In Expanded Cinema Re-Enactment, Lucas M. Ihlein

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In this short paper, I introduce the work of the artist group Teaching and Learning Cinema, which reenacts Expanded Cinema artworks from the 1960s and 70s. I make a connection between sociality (which binds together artists in collectives and screening "clubs") and the issue of mediumspecificity. Re-enacting Expanded Cinema, I suggest, gently probes at the intersection of mediumspecificity and sociality. This practice asks questions about the material qualities of film, video and performance, and the particular relations these media carry across time and culture.


Four Short Films Made With Love: 'Nothing As It Seems', David Blackall Jan 2013

Four Short Films Made With Love: 'Nothing As It Seems', David Blackall

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Screened for the duration of November, 2013, at the Drawing Room - Art Gallery,

33 Roslyn Street, Sydney, Australia

2011 0421 162 447

https://www.facebook.com/drawroom

NOTHING IS AS IT SEEMS – David Blackall A film made from 4 short stories on love

1] It's all been blackened out, but never mind

2] Karaoke Jane

3] The War Diaries of Stephen Dupont

4] The late David Larwill - ROAR painter - speaking at Newcastle City Gallery 2002.


The Vietnamese Concept Of A Feminine Ideal And The Images Of Australian Women In Olga Masters’ Stories, Thu Hanh Nguyen Jan 2013

The Vietnamese Concept Of A Feminine Ideal And The Images Of Australian Women In Olga Masters’ Stories, Thu Hanh Nguyen

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In this paper I compare Olga Masters’ portrayals of women with the ideals which are currently expected to be followed by Vietnamese women. The paper will investigate to what extend Olga Masters’ work corresponds to the Vietnamese traditional expectation of feminine ideals which are based on four essential attributes: industriousness, appropriate self-presentation, good communication skills, and virtue.


Preparing Law Graduates For Rural And Regional Practice: A New Curriculum-Based Approach, Amanda Kennedy, Theresa Smith-Ruig, Richard Coverdale, Caroline Hart, Reid Mortensen, Claire Macken, Trish Mundy, Jennifer Nielsen Jan 2013

Preparing Law Graduates For Rural And Regional Practice: A New Curriculum-Based Approach, Amanda Kennedy, Theresa Smith-Ruig, Richard Coverdale, Caroline Hart, Reid Mortensen, Claire Macken, Trish Mundy, Jennifer Nielsen

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper documents the development of a curriculum-based approach to prepare law graduates for employment in rural and regional areas in Australia. The project was prompted by survey data which indicates that there are widespread difficulties in attracting lawyers to rural and regional areas. Further literature research and assessment of current practice revealed that employment as a lawyer in a rural or regional context is characterised by distinct challenges and opportunities; however, the tertiary curriculum does little to prepare students for practice in these areas, despite being well positioned to do so. This led to the creation of a publicly ...


The Prosecution Of Pirates In National Courts, Robin M. Warner Jan 2013

The Prosecution Of Pirates In National Courts, Robin M. Warner

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The substantial rise in piracy incidents off the Horn of Africa since 2008 has exposed significant gaps in the international law framework for investigation and prosecution of piracy offences and its implementation in national criminal justice systems. This article examines the principal elements of this framework including the definition of piracy and associated obligations in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC). It reviews progress towards criminalisation of piracy offences in national legislative systems and distinctive trends in piracy legislation around the world. It also examines key features of the jurisprudence emerging from the regional ...


Combating Maritime Piracy In Southeast Asia From International And Regional Legal Perspectives: Challenges And Prospects, Ahmad Amri Jan 2013

Combating Maritime Piracy In Southeast Asia From International And Regional Legal Perspectives: Challenges And Prospects, Ahmad Amri

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Piracy is considered a critical maritime security threat in Southeast Asia. Whilst piracy has always been a perennial problem in the region, this threat has received increasing attention in the region over the past few years. Reports published by the International Maritime Organisation as well as the International Maritime Bureau show an alarming increase in acts of piracy on Southeast Asian waters over the past decade. In ancients times, the main drivers of piracy were raiding for plunder and capture of slaves; however, in modern times, developments in politics, economics and even military technology have drastically altered the universal crime ...


Introduction: Nationalism And Transnationalism In Australian Historical Writing, Sharon Crozier-De Rosa, David Lowe Jan 2013

Introduction: Nationalism And Transnationalism In Australian Historical Writing, Sharon Crozier-De Rosa, David Lowe

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

One of the strongest trends in Australian historical writing over the last two decades has been a drive to emphasise the nation’s connectedness with the rest of the world. Across a range of historical genres and topics, we have seen a new enthusiasm to explore entanglements between Australian history and that of other places and peoples. The history of travel has been an important contributor to this line of inquiry, but it is at the more intellectual, imaginative and emotional levels that the greatest gains are sometimes claimed for the study of what has become known as ‘transnationalism’. This ...


Fictionalism About Folk Psychology, Daniel Hutto Jan 2013

Fictionalism About Folk Psychology, Daniel Hutto

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper argues that fictionalism about folk psychology, FaF, is ill motivated in any domain. It is argued that there is no advantage in trying to vindicate folk psychology by treating the constructs of classical cognitivism--namely, subpersonal mental representations--as useful fictions in contrast to serious scientific posits or as serving as the basis for philosophical explanations. Both scientific and philosophical considerations point to the conclusion that subpersonal representations of the sort that classical cognitivism posits should be eliminated, not preserved, by our best science of mind. Yet there is no need to assume that folk psychological explanations are subpersonally based ...


Taking Hints From Hogwarts: Uow's First Year Law Immersion Program, Cassandra E. Sharp, Margaret A. Bond, Trish Mundy, Karina Murray, Julia Quilter Jan 2013

Taking Hints From Hogwarts: Uow's First Year Law Immersion Program, Cassandra E. Sharp, Margaret A. Bond, Trish Mundy, Karina Murray, Julia Quilter

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The first year of law school is a challenging time: adapting to new surroundings; making new friends; absorbing new ideas, and developing new ways of learning, thinking, speaking and performing – all with the added pressure of high academic achievement. This paper explores the important role of modern law teachers as guides and mentors for the students’ transformative journey.

As experienced first year teachers in the LLB program, the authors have devoted considerable efforts to developing a program that facilitates s smooth transition for law students. We believe law teachers have a unique opportunity as well as a responsibility to facilitate ...


A Work In Progress, Garry C. Jones Jan 2013

A Work In Progress, Garry C. Jones

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Inspired by a recent visit to the Australian museum to view its collection of Aboriginal artefacts from south eastern Australian I felt motivated to know what was in the collection and to attempt to understand what it might feel like, and ultimately, what it might mean to craft such objects today. Beyond the desire to manufacture my own artefacts I had no knowledge of their history: who the people were that manufactured them in the first place, the contexts in which they were produced, or the motivations of those who produced them. What does it mean for Aboriginal people today ...


Rudd Rewrites Playbook On Wedge Politics, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Rudd Rewrites Playbook On Wedge Politics, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

It’s the end of day eight and Kevin Rudd’s surprise debate announcement on same-sex marriage is still making news - maybe he is the suppository of all wisdom.

SBS Evening News led with an exclusive from Karen Middleton that even Julia Gillard was thinking of changing her mind on the issue. The staunchly anti-marriage-equality, former PM was apparently seeking a meeting with Ellen Degeneres and her Australian born wife Portia de Rossi during their Australian visit in March. Middleton reported Gillard was considering using a photo-op with the stars to announce a change of heart. But it didn’t ...


Same Sex Marriage Ends The Debate, Leads The Coverage, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Same Sex Marriage Ends The Debate, Leads The Coverage, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Kevin Rudd’s promise to introduce legislation for “marriage equality” within the first 100 days of his government, if elected, was one of the few concrete new promises to emerge in the election debate.

This promise, which came at the end of the debate, led the news in a number of debate round-ups internationally and locally. Britain’s Independent had a story online within half an hour of the debate’s conclusion headlined: “Australia election debate: Kevin Rudd promises to legalise same-sex marriage” and news.com.au had a story: “Rudd commits to gay marriage”.

It is interesting that this ...


Objective Journalism Cannot Hold Politicians To Account, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Objective Journalism Cannot Hold Politicians To Account, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The major story of day three of the election campaign was the coalition’s announcement of a 1.5% cut in the rate of company tax.

The way this story was covered by The Australian and The Guardian represent two completely different views of the role of journalism in an election campaign.

It was an unfolding story throughout the day as the ALP demanded to know how the cut would be paid for.

Treasurer, Chris Bowen rejected Tony Abbott’s claim that the cut could be paid for by previously announced spending cuts as: “magic pudding economics” and double-counting. Although ...


Political Speeches And The Illusion Of Perfect Pitch, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Political Speeches And The Illusion Of Perfect Pitch, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott’s speechifying at the opening of the Australian War memorial’s Afghanistan Gallery has been reported as a kind of momentary cease-fire between the rival leaders. But it was unmistakably part of the election campaign.

I happened to catch it live on ABC News 24.

Like any ceremony that marks Australian military involvement in America’s wars on terror it was a fundamentally dishonest display hyping “our” sacrifice with barely a mention of the horrific sacrifices of the Afghan civilians. That aside it was instructive.

Mostly it showed quite clearly why Kevin Rudd is popular ...


Apocalypse Now: Why The Movies Want The World To End Every Year, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Apocalypse Now: Why The Movies Want The World To End Every Year, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The last few years have begun with predictions of the Apocalypse hanging over us.

The Rapture was supposed to come in 2011, with US preacher Harold Camping first saying it would come in May then readjusting his sights to October. Last year, of course, brought us predictions of the Mayan Apocalypse, which passed with lots of parties but no lasting fireworks.

With solar activity expected to reach a cyclical peak in 2013, this year was shaping up as another big year for apocalyptic fears, however NASA have recently downgraded their predictions for solar storms. So does this mean that we ...


Aggression And Perceived National Face Threats In Mainland Chinese And Taiwanese, Dániel Z. Kadar, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang Jan 2013

Aggression And Perceived National Face Threats In Mainland Chinese And Taiwanese, Dániel Z. Kadar, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This study examines manifestations of verbal aggression in an intergroup context between Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese on computer-mediated communication (CMC) discussion boards. We examine the role of perceptions of national identity and face in occasioning instances of aggression in Sino-Taiwanese online interactions. It will be argued that there is a fundamental difference between Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese ways of displaying aggression when discussing cross-Strait issues. While the Taiwanese use abusive terms in order to dissociate themselves from the Mainland Chinese in online discourse, the latter tend to associate themselves with Taiwanese through terms that subsume Taiwanese claims to a national ...


Graduate Qualities And Journalism Curriculum Renewal: Balancing Tertiary Expectations And Industry Needs In A Changing Environment., Stephen J. Tanner, Marcus O'Donnell, Trevor Cullen, Kerry Green Jan 2013

Graduate Qualities And Journalism Curriculum Renewal: Balancing Tertiary Expectations And Industry Needs In A Changing Environment., Stephen J. Tanner, Marcus O'Donnell, Trevor Cullen, Kerry Green

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This project explores the attitudes of universities and media organisations towards journalism curriculum renewal. In part, the project is inspired by an apparent schism that exists between some journalists and editors on the one hand, and journalism academics on the other regarding the role of journalism training and education, specifically, where it should most appropriately be taught – in-house, that is by the media organisation, within a university environment, or elsewhere. This project provides the first comprehensive analysis of the journalism education sector in Australia to consider the question of curriculum renewal and the relationship between universities and industry on a ...


'His Grief Is The Plague': Poetry Of Loss And The Risk Of Losing One's Readers, Michael R. Jacklin Jan 2013

'His Grief Is The Plague': Poetry Of Loss And The Risk Of Losing One's Readers, Michael R. Jacklin

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The book Lalomanu (2010), by Jorge Salavert, is a collection of poetry written in response to the death of the author’s six-year-old daughter Clea, one of the victims of the tsunami which swept ashore in Samoa, American Samoa and Tonga in September 2009. Lalomanu is a deeply moving account of grief and mourning, a book that its author knows will be too painful for some to read. As Salavert points out in his poems, most people he knows seem afraid of his grief; they are unable to respond to, or acknowledge, its intensity. And yet, in its expressions of ...


The Petition Of Bah Fook Of Sofala, 1866, Kate Bagnall Jan 2013

The Petition Of Bah Fook Of Sofala, 1866, Kate Bagnall

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article introduces an unusual and significant historical document from the goldfields of colonial New South Wales – a petition to the Governor of New South Wales signed by more than 270 Chinese men, predominantly goldminers, living at Sofala on the Turon River goldfields in 1866. The petition concerned the unfair conviction of Bah Fook (百福), a fellow miner, for injuring a young white girl in a fight with her mother. The petition provides an interesting window into race relations on the Australian goldfields of the 1860s, highlighting the close and personal interactions of Chinese and white residents and the agency ...


Comparative Legal Cultural Analyses Of International Economic Law: A New Methodological Approach, Colin B. Picker Jan 2013

Comparative Legal Cultural Analyses Of International Economic Law: A New Methodological Approach, Colin B. Picker

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The effective development and operation of the law faces many obstacles. Among the more intractable yet hidden barriers to the law are legal cultural disconnects and discontinuities. These occur when opposing legal cultural characteristics from different legal cultures are forced to interact as part of the implementation of the law across two different legal cultures. This conflictual interaction can impede or block the success of that law. While present in domestic legal systems, these conflicts are more likely, and may be deeper, between the many different legal cultures involved in the international legal order. Identification of such legal cultural disconnects ...


This Belongs To Me, The One Dollar Note: The Eternal Returns Of Appropriation, Ian A. Mclean Jan 2013

This Belongs To Me, The One Dollar Note: The Eternal Returns Of Appropriation, Ian A. Mclean

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The dictionary meanings of appropriate and misappropriate are the same: to take something for one’s own use without the owner’s permission. Appropriate also has an additional dictionary meaning: to use something for a purpose that it wasn’t originally intended for. Poetic appropriation is quite different. It does often use images without the owner’s permission and often for an unexpected purpose, but its practice descends from hermeneutics (from Hermes, the ancient Greek messenger of the gods): the ancient art of interpreting the world’s speech. Its methods derive from theories of mimesis and simulation that can be ...


The Plutonomy Of The 1%: Conspicuous Consumption In The New Gilded Age (Youtube Video), Timothy Dimuzio Jan 2013

The Plutonomy Of The 1%: Conspicuous Consumption In The New Gilded Age (Youtube Video), Timothy Dimuzio

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In 2005, Citigroup released a report that echoed a famous quote from F. Scott Fitzgerald: ‘Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me’. Penned by a team of global equity strategists, their report – Plutonomy: Buying Luxury, Explaining Global Imbalances – advanced the thesis that the world was dividing into two main blocs: 1) the plutonomy powered by the conspicuous consumption of the wealthy; and 2) the rest of humanity. The report also argued that income disparities were likely to deepen in the future, making the global rich the key drivers of differential-equity returns. Although ...


Psychology Unified: From Folk Psychology To Radical Enactivism, Daniel Hutto Jan 2013

Psychology Unified: From Folk Psychology To Radical Enactivism, Daniel Hutto

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

A properly radical enactivism—one that eschews the idea that all mentality is necessarily contentful and representational—has better prospects of unifying psychology than does traditional cognitivism. This paper offers a five-step argument in support of this claim. The first section advances the view that a principled way of characterizing psychology’s subject matter is what is required if it is to be regarded as a special science. In this light, section two examines why and how cognitivism continues to be regarded as the best potential unifier for the discipline. But the third section exposes a serious problem about the ...


The Boundary Riders: Artists In Academia / Artists And Academia, Sarah B. Miller, Brogan S. Bunt Jan 2013

The Boundary Riders: Artists In Academia / Artists And Academia, Sarah B. Miller, Brogan S. Bunt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper seeks to explore the challenges and the rewards of supervision from two perspectives: artists who are employed as lecturers within the academy and mature artists returning to the academy to undertake a higher degree by research.

The University of Wollongong introduced its Doctorate of Creative Arts (DCA) program in 1986. As one of the earliest doctoral programs in the country, this apparent perspicacity was arguably more to do with Creative Arts as a resident faculty within the University, and the need to work within a university framework. This is in contradistinction to the forced marriages undertaken between many ...


Blog: Skewed View Of Alp Obscures Reality, Anthony Ashbolt Jan 2013

Blog: Skewed View Of Alp Obscures Reality, Anthony Ashbolt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As the Labor government lies embattled, ready for a substantial defeat at the polls today, facts about the Australian economy and overseas understandings of Australia's performance over the last six years are emerging. Far from being the basket-case fashioned by the opposition and much of the media, the Australian economy's growth has actually lifted the average standard of living. A study by Ben Phillips from the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) shows wage growth has outstripped inflation and produced an economic benefit for the average Australian family that is quite significant. We do not hear ...


Who Are Our Nomad’S Today? Deleuze’S Political Ontology And The Revolutionary Problematic, Craig A. Lundy Jan 2013

Who Are Our Nomad’S Today? Deleuze’S Political Ontology And The Revolutionary Problematic, Craig A. Lundy

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper will address the question of the revolution in Gilles Deleuze's political ontology. More specifically, it will explore what kind of person Deleuze believes is capable of bringing about genuine and practical transformation. Contrary to the belief that a Deleuzian programme for change centres on the facilitation of 'absolute deterritorialisation' and pure 'lines of flight', I will demonstrate how Deleuze in fact advocates a more cautious and incremental if not conservative practice that promotes the ethic of prudence. This will be achieved in part through a critical analysis of the dualistic premises upon which much Deleuzian political philosophy ...