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Articles 1501 - 1530 of 3945

Full-Text Articles in Law

Indian Movies, Brand Australia And The Marketing Of Australian Cosmopolitanism, Andrew Hassam Jan 2013

Indian Movies, Brand Australia And The Marketing Of Australian Cosmopolitanism, Andrew Hassam

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Indian movies shot overseas have attracted the attention of not only advertising agencies keen to see their clients' brands appearing on-screen, but also government tourism commissions eyeing India's growing middle classes as potential visitors. Australian federal and state governments offer Indian film producers financial incentives to film in Australia, and Australian cities now regularly supply Indian movies with backdrops of upmarket shopping malls, stylish apartments and exclusive restaurants. Yet in helping to project the lifestyle fantasies of India's new middle classes, Australian government agencies are supporting an Indian view of Australia. While this image may attract Indian tourists ...


The Vietnamese Concept Of A Feminine Ideal And The Images Of Australian Women In Olga Masters’ Stories, Thu Hanh Nguyen Jan 2013

The Vietnamese Concept Of A Feminine Ideal And The Images Of Australian Women In Olga Masters’ Stories, Thu Hanh Nguyen

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In this paper I compare Olga Masters’ portrayals of women with the ideals which are currently expected to be followed by Vietnamese women. The paper will investigate to what extend Olga Masters’ work corresponds to the Vietnamese traditional expectation of feminine ideals which are based on four essential attributes: industriousness, appropriate self-presentation, good communication skills, and virtue.


Academic Employment And Gender Equity Legislation In Australia And Japan, 1970-2010, Kirsti Rawstron Jan 2013

Academic Employment And Gender Equity Legislation In Australia And Japan, 1970-2010, Kirsti Rawstron

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the rate of change of men and women's employment as university academic staff in Australia and Japan; and, drawing on quantitative methods, show differences in the rate of change since the introduction of anti-sex discrimination legislation. The author also includes a discussion of programmes designed to increase female participation in academic positions to provide background to the existing changes.

Design/methodology/approach - Using statistics published by the Ministries of Education of both countries, a time series of female participation at each level of academic staff was constructed. Breakpoint analysis is ...


Medium-Specificity And Sociality In Expanded Cinema Re-Enactment, Lucas M. Ihlein Jan 2013

Medium-Specificity And Sociality In Expanded Cinema Re-Enactment, Lucas M. Ihlein

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

In this short paper, I introduce the work of the artist group Teaching and Learning Cinema, which reenacts Expanded Cinema artworks from the 1960s and 70s. I make a connection between sociality (which binds together artists in collectives and screening "clubs") and the issue of mediumspecificity. Re-enacting Expanded Cinema, I suggest, gently probes at the intersection of mediumspecificity and sociality. This practice asks questions about the material qualities of film, video and performance, and the particular relations these media carry across time and culture.


Among The Machines: Australian And Nz Artists, Su Ballard Jan 2013

Among The Machines: Australian And Nz Artists, Su Ballard

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

I was lead curator and invited scholar for AMONG THE MACHINES. The exhibition included 13 artists from New Zealand and Australia including major figures. The artists are: Ruth Buchanan, Bronwyn Holloway-Smith, Hayden Fowler, Douglas Bagnall, Fiona Pardington, Nathan Pohio, Hannah and Aaron Beehre, Daniel Crooks, Ronnie Van Hout, Susan Norrie, Jae Hoon Lee, Stella Brennan and Ann Shelton. The exhibition was advertised in E-flux, Art in Australia, Art News. I was interviewed on National Radio (4th July 2013), and it has received numerous favorable reviews.


Introduction: Nationalism And Transnationalism In Australian Historical Writing, Sharon Crozier-De Rosa, David Lowe Jan 2013

Introduction: Nationalism And Transnationalism In Australian Historical Writing, Sharon Crozier-De Rosa, David Lowe

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

One of the strongest trends in Australian historical writing over the last two decades has been a drive to emphasise the nation’s connectedness with the rest of the world. Across a range of historical genres and topics, we have seen a new enthusiasm to explore entanglements between Australian history and that of other places and peoples. The history of travel has been an important contributor to this line of inquiry, but it is at the more intellectual, imaginative and emotional levels that the greatest gains are sometimes claimed for the study of what has become known as ‘transnationalism’. This ...


Blog: Costings Become A Guessing Game, Anthony Ashbolt Jan 2013

Blog: Costings Become A Guessing Game, Anthony Ashbolt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Labor’s “Gotcha” moment seemed to have backfired badly with Treasury and Finance Secretaries, together with the head of the Parliamentary Budget Office, distancing their units from claims about a $10 billion black hole. Labor’s advice from these Departments was provided with regard to policies outlined prior to the period of caretaker Government. Rather than point to a specific mistake related to earlier policy calculations, Labor could have just kept hammering the point about costings in general. Nonetheless, as Crikey correspondent Bernard Keane observed: ‘‘I’m of the view that the costings imbroglio doesn’t matter a jot: voters ...


Blog: Skewed View Of Alp Obscures Reality, Anthony Ashbolt Jan 2013

Blog: Skewed View Of Alp Obscures Reality, Anthony Ashbolt

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

As the Labor government lies embattled, ready for a substantial defeat at the polls today, facts about the Australian economy and overseas understandings of Australia's performance over the last six years are emerging. Far from being the basket-case fashioned by the opposition and much of the media, the Australian economy's growth has actually lifted the average standard of living. A study by Ben Phillips from the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM) shows wage growth has outstripped inflation and produced an economic benefit for the average Australian family that is quite significant. We do not hear ...


Who Are Our Nomad’S Today? Deleuze’S Political Ontology And The Revolutionary Problematic, Craig A. Lundy Jan 2013

Who Are Our Nomad’S Today? Deleuze’S Political Ontology And The Revolutionary Problematic, Craig A. Lundy

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper will address the question of the revolution in Gilles Deleuze's political ontology. More specifically, it will explore what kind of person Deleuze believes is capable of bringing about genuine and practical transformation. Contrary to the belief that a Deleuzian programme for change centres on the facilitation of 'absolute deterritorialisation' and pure 'lines of flight', I will demonstrate how Deleuze in fact advocates a more cautious and incremental if not conservative practice that promotes the ethic of prudence. This will be achieved in part through a critical analysis of the dualistic premises upon which much Deleuzian political philosophy ...


Would 'The Making Of The English Working Class' Get Made Today?, Rowan Cahill Jan 2013

Would 'The Making Of The English Working Class' Get Made Today?, Rowan Cahill

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

It is fifty years since leftist publisher Victor Gollancz published The Making of the English Working Class by English historian Edward Palmer Thompson (1924–1993). During 2013, this event has been, and is being, commemorated globally in political and scholarly conferences and journals. My dilapidated copy is the Penguin revised edition (1968), purchased in 1970. Still in print, and with more than a million copies sold worldwide, Thompson’s hugely influential doorstop book is regarded as a pivotal exploration of social history, as much an historical classic as it is a literary classic. The book runs to some 900 pages ...


The Day I Will Be Free - A Rediscovered Courtroom Effusion By Frank The Poet, Mark Gregory Jan 2013

The Day I Will Be Free - A Rediscovered Courtroom Effusion By Frank The Poet, Mark Gregory

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Copy of an 1835 poem by Frank McNamara with related annotations.


Preparing Law Graduates For Rural And Regional Practice: A New Curriculum-Based Approach, Amanda Kennedy, Theresa Smith-Ruig, Richard Coverdale, Caroline Hart, Reid Mortensen, Claire Macken, Trish Mundy, Jennifer Nielsen Jan 2013

Preparing Law Graduates For Rural And Regional Practice: A New Curriculum-Based Approach, Amanda Kennedy, Theresa Smith-Ruig, Richard Coverdale, Caroline Hart, Reid Mortensen, Claire Macken, Trish Mundy, Jennifer Nielsen

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This paper documents the development of a curriculum-based approach to prepare law graduates for employment in rural and regional areas in Australia. The project was prompted by survey data which indicates that there are widespread difficulties in attracting lawyers to rural and regional areas. Further literature research and assessment of current practice revealed that employment as a lawyer in a rural or regional context is characterised by distinct challenges and opportunities; however, the tertiary curriculum does little to prepare students for practice in these areas, despite being well positioned to do so. This led to the creation of a publicly ...


Combating Maritime Piracy In Southeast Asia From International And Regional Legal Perspectives: Challenges And Prospects, Ahmad Amri Jan 2013

Combating Maritime Piracy In Southeast Asia From International And Regional Legal Perspectives: Challenges And Prospects, Ahmad Amri

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Piracy is considered a critical maritime security threat in Southeast Asia. Whilst piracy has always been a perennial problem in the region, this threat has received increasing attention in the region over the past few years. Reports published by the International Maritime Organisation as well as the International Maritime Bureau show an alarming increase in acts of piracy on Southeast Asian waters over the past decade. In ancients times, the main drivers of piracy were raiding for plunder and capture of slaves; however, in modern times, developments in politics, economics and even military technology have drastically altered the universal crime ...


The Prosecution Of Pirates In National Courts, Robin M. Warner Jan 2013

The Prosecution Of Pirates In National Courts, Robin M. Warner

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The substantial rise in piracy incidents off the Horn of Africa since 2008 has exposed significant gaps in the international law framework for investigation and prosecution of piracy offences and its implementation in national criminal justice systems. This article examines the principal elements of this framework including the definition of piracy and associated obligations in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC). It reviews progress towards criminalisation of piracy offences in national legislative systems and distinctive trends in piracy legislation around the world. It also examines key features of the jurisprudence emerging from the regional ...


Objective Journalism Cannot Hold Politicians To Account, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Objective Journalism Cannot Hold Politicians To Account, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The major story of day three of the election campaign was the coalition’s announcement of a 1.5% cut in the rate of company tax.

The way this story was covered by The Australian and The Guardian represent two completely different views of the role of journalism in an election campaign.

It was an unfolding story throughout the day as the ALP demanded to know how the cut would be paid for.

Treasurer, Chris Bowen rejected Tony Abbott’s claim that the cut could be paid for by previously announced spending cuts as: “magic pudding economics” and double-counting. Although ...


Rudd Rewrites Playbook On Wedge Politics, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Rudd Rewrites Playbook On Wedge Politics, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

It’s the end of day eight and Kevin Rudd’s surprise debate announcement on same-sex marriage is still making news - maybe he is the suppository of all wisdom.

SBS Evening News led with an exclusive from Karen Middleton that even Julia Gillard was thinking of changing her mind on the issue. The staunchly anti-marriage-equality, former PM was apparently seeking a meeting with Ellen Degeneres and her Australian born wife Portia de Rossi during their Australian visit in March. Middleton reported Gillard was considering using a photo-op with the stars to announce a change of heart. But it didn’t ...


Apocalypse Now: Why The Movies Want The World To End Every Year, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Apocalypse Now: Why The Movies Want The World To End Every Year, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The last few years have begun with predictions of the Apocalypse hanging over us.

The Rapture was supposed to come in 2011, with US preacher Harold Camping first saying it would come in May then readjusting his sights to October. Last year, of course, brought us predictions of the Mayan Apocalypse, which passed with lots of parties but no lasting fireworks.

With solar activity expected to reach a cyclical peak in 2013, this year was shaping up as another big year for apocalyptic fears, however NASA have recently downgraded their predictions for solar storms. So does this mean that we ...


Political Speeches And The Illusion Of Perfect Pitch, Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Political Speeches And The Illusion Of Perfect Pitch, Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Kevin Rudd and Tony Abbott’s speechifying at the opening of the Australian War memorial’s Afghanistan Gallery has been reported as a kind of momentary cease-fire between the rival leaders. But it was unmistakably part of the election campaign.

I happened to catch it live on ABC News 24.

Like any ceremony that marks Australian military involvement in America’s wars on terror it was a fundamentally dishonest display hyping “our” sacrifice with barely a mention of the horrific sacrifices of the Afghan civilians. That aside it was instructive.

Mostly it showed quite clearly why Kevin Rudd is popular ...


Aggression And Perceived National Face Threats In Mainland Chinese And Taiwanese, Dániel Z. Kadar, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang Jan 2013

Aggression And Perceived National Face Threats In Mainland Chinese And Taiwanese, Dániel Z. Kadar, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This study examines manifestations of verbal aggression in an intergroup context between Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese on computer-mediated communication (CMC) discussion boards. We examine the role of perceptions of national identity and face in occasioning instances of aggression in Sino-Taiwanese online interactions. It will be argued that there is a fundamental difference between Mainland Chinese and Taiwanese ways of displaying aggression when discussing cross-Strait issues. While the Taiwanese use abusive terms in order to dissociate themselves from the Mainland Chinese in online discourse, the latter tend to associate themselves with Taiwanese through terms that subsume Taiwanese claims to a national ...


Why Women's Leadership Is The Cause Of Our Time, Rangita De Silva De Alwis Jan 2013

Why Women's Leadership Is The Cause Of Our Time, Rangita De Silva De Alwis

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Women continue to be underrepresented in leadership positions throughout the world. Yet, studies show that the exclusion of women from politics and public service negatively impacts the public good. Identifying women's leadership as the economic and moral imperative of our time, this Article explores the way in which greater representation of women in leadership positions yields beneficial results for both women and men, as well as social and economic progress. By examining the reasons for the substantial barriers women face in obtaining such positions, including the masculinization of politics, gendered caregiving responsibilities, and gender violence, this Article concludes that ...


Graduate Qualities And Journalism Curriculum Renewal: Balancing Tertiary Expectations And Industry Needs In A Changing Environment., Stephen J. Tanner, Marcus O'Donnell, Trevor Cullen, Kerry Green Jan 2013

Graduate Qualities And Journalism Curriculum Renewal: Balancing Tertiary Expectations And Industry Needs In A Changing Environment., Stephen J. Tanner, Marcus O'Donnell, Trevor Cullen, Kerry Green

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This project explores the attitudes of universities and media organisations towards journalism curriculum renewal. In part, the project is inspired by an apparent schism that exists between some journalists and editors on the one hand, and journalism academics on the other regarding the role of journalism training and education, specifically, where it should most appropriately be taught – in-house, that is by the media organisation, within a university environment, or elsewhere. This project provides the first comprehensive analysis of the journalism education sector in Australia to consider the question of curriculum renewal and the relationship between universities and industry on a ...


The Kingdom (This Is Not Show Business), Teo Treloar Jan 2013

The Kingdom (This Is Not Show Business), Teo Treloar

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

No abstract provided.


Twitter Needs Tony (Not), Marcus O'Donnell Jan 2013

Twitter Needs Tony (Not), Marcus O'Donnell

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The Sunday Telegraph has again weighed into the election with a front cover sure to get lots of comment. A little less provocative than The Telegraph's first effort but designed to garner reaction. As I wrote earlier in the campaign, these grand statements, that once represented the newspaper's editorial power to direct votes, now exist in a much more complex world where media users are also media producers. The consistent editorial bias of News Ltd's overall coverage of the campaign will undoubtedly have some effect, although this is notoriously difficult to measure. But reaction to some of ...


Peace Studies War – Boycotting Israel For The Sake Of International Law?, Gregory L. Rose Jan 2013

Peace Studies War – Boycotting Israel For The Sake Of International Law?, Gregory L. Rose

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

This article considers the current boycott of Israeli academics by the Sydney Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (CPACS) - an affiliate of the University of Sydney - arguing that the boycott suppresses academic freedom, does not promote international law or peace, and is fundamentally racist. It was written in answer to an argument in defence of the boycott recently posted on the Australian-government supported website "The Conversation" by CPACS lecturer Paul Duffill (Jan. 15), who argued "the International Court of Justice ruled in July 2004 that Israel is occupying Palestinian territory in violation of international law", and therefore "a peace centre ...


Subcultural Dilettantism And Online Visibility, Andrew Whelan Jan 2013

Subcultural Dilettantism And Online Visibility, Andrew Whelan

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

It is standard practice in music-oriented subcultures for commitment to the scene to be expressed through knowledge of the musical history of that scene, as that is articulated, notably, through ownership of the recordings which form ‘the canon’. Typically, this collecting extends also to ‘paratextual’ material produced by musicians, labels, journalists, and other devotees: zines, books, T-shirts and other ephemera. In relation to ‘niche’ scenes, this practice of collecting is complemented by the relative rarity of the goods so collected. We can understand this interest in terms derived from Pierre Bourdieu, and developed latterly by Sarah Th ornton and others ...


Universalising Jurisdiction Over Marine Living Resources Crime, Gregory L. Rose, Ben Tsamenyi Jan 2013

Universalising Jurisdiction Over Marine Living Resources Crime, Gregory L. Rose, Ben Tsamenyi

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

WWF is one of the world’s largest and most experienced independent conservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a global network active in more than 100 countries.

WWF’s mission is to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world’s biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

The Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS) is a leading provider of research, education and ...


Collaborative Creation Of Spoken Language Corpora, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang Jan 2013

Collaborative Creation Of Spoken Language Corpora, Michael Haugh, Wei-Lin Melody Chang

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

Analysing authentic interactions at progressively greater levels of complexity is one means of promoting deeper engagement with pragmatic phenomena amongst L2 learners. However, effective analysis often requires a greater amount of data than learners can feasibly gather. It is proposed here that encouraging students to collaborate through the creation of a corpus of spoken interactions is one potentially effective way to help them engage with a much richer set of interactional data than they might normally encounter. Here we report on a corpus created through “crowdsourcing” the collection and transcription of recordings of spoken interactions, the Griffith Corpus of Spoken ...


The Surface Of Language, Madeleine T. Kelly Jan 2013

The Surface Of Language, Madeleine T. Kelly

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The roots of these paintings are fragments. Forms that appear grotesque, hollowed or as though composed of splintered fields are spliced together in oneiric landscapes. Their content and process are a sort of sabotage – deformed protagonists appear caught in the act of breaking and in turn collide with the push and pull of paint. If this is aestheticising destruction, it is only in an ironic hope to interrogate conflict that surrounds drone warfare, blind consumption and the massacre of living things.

The lines in the collection of stones exhibited here provide a surface of exchange for the intersection of language ...


Ecophilosophy And Communalist Utopian Novels: Do Bicycles And Biotechnology Go Together?, Anne L. Melano Jan 2013

Ecophilosophy And Communalist Utopian Novels: Do Bicycles And Biotechnology Go Together?, Anne L. Melano

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The period of social change from the 1960s to the 1980s saw a flowering of utopian novels, from Huxley's Island (1962) and Le Guin's The Dispossessed (1964) through to Callenbach's Ecotopia (1975) and Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time (1976). These works were infused with a vision of an ideal world structured as a decentralised network of small villages or precincts. In each novel, local, participatory decision-making was the key to a utopian "good place" both for people and for ecological communities as a whole. The need to reharmonise with ecological systems saw a rejection ...


Hpv Vaccines And Cancer Prevention, Science Versus Activism, Lucija Tomljenovic, Roslyn Judith Wilyman, Eva Vanamee, Christopher A. Shaw Jan 2013

Hpv Vaccines And Cancer Prevention, Science Versus Activism, Lucija Tomljenovic, Roslyn Judith Wilyman, Eva Vanamee, Christopher A. Shaw

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts - Papers

The rationale behind current worldwide human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination programs starts from two basic premises, 1) that HPV vaccines will prevent cervical cancers and save lives and, 2) have no risk of serious side effects. Therefore, efforts should be made to get as many pre-adolescent girls vaccinated in order to decrease the burden of cervical cancer. Careful analysis of HPV vaccine pre- and post-licensure data shows however that both of these premises are at odds with factual evidence and are largely derived from significant misinterpretation of available data