Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Litigation

Discovery

SelectedWorks

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Law

Preparing For Your Rule 26(F) Conference When Esi Is Involved - And Isn't Esi Always Involved?, Amii N. Castle Jan 2015

Preparing For Your Rule 26(F) Conference When Esi Is Involved - And Isn't Esi Always Involved?, Amii N. Castle

Amii n Castle

In most civil cases filed today, discovery is likely to include electronically stored information (“ESI”). This article details the steps counsel must take when a lawsuit filed, and the article gives particularized instruction on ESI at each juncture. The article discusses the following steps: At Step One, the judge issues an initial scheduling order, which puts into motion several deadlines: the Rule 26(f) conference, the date to submit the parties’ planning report, and the Rule 16 Conference. Step Two directs attorneys to talk to their own clients about ESI that is relevant to the case. Questions are suggested, such ...


Business Entities - Basic Legal Issues, Curtis E.A. Karnow Dec 2014

Business Entities - Basic Legal Issues, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

Brief introduction to certain business litigation issues including vicarious liability, sealing records, representation by counsel, qualification of domestic corporations; depositions of persons most knowledgeable, and conflicts of laws.


Sealing Records, Curtis E.A. Karnow Oct 2013

Sealing Records, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

Practical tips on sealing records in California state courts


E-Discovery Issues, Curtis E.A. Karnow Jan 2013

E-Discovery Issues, Curtis E.A. Karnow

Curtis E.A. Karnow

Bullet point outline of e-discovery issues


Back To The Future: Discovery Cost Allocation And Modern Procedural Theory, Martin H. Redish, Colleen Mcnamara Jan 2010

Back To The Future: Discovery Cost Allocation And Modern Procedural Theory, Martin H. Redish, Colleen Mcnamara

Martin H Redish

It has long been established that as a general rule, discovery costs are to remain with the party from whom discovery has been sought. While courts have authority to "shift" costs in an individual instance, the presumption against such an alteration in traditional practice is quite strong. Yet at no point did the drafters of the original Federal Rules of Civil Procedure ever make an explicit decision to allocate discovery costs in this manner. Nor, apparently, did they (or anyone since) ever explain why such an allocation choice is to be made in the first place. As a result, our ...