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2003

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Full-Text Articles in Law

Valuation Averaging: A New Procedure For Resolving Valuation Disputes, Keith Sharfman Dec 2003

Valuation Averaging: A New Procedure For Resolving Valuation Disputes, Keith Sharfman

Rutgers Law School (Newark) Faculty Papers

In this Article, Professor Sharfman addresses the problem of "discretionary valuation": that courts resolve valuation disputes arbitrarily and unpredictably, thus harming litigants and society. As a solution, he proposes the enactment of "valuation averaging," a new procedure for resolving valuation disputes modeled on the algorithmic valuation processes often agreed to by sophisticated private firms in advance of any dispute. He argues that by replacing the discretion of judges and juries with a mechanical valuation process, valuation averaging would cause litigants to introduce more plausible and conciliatory valuations into evidence and thereby reduce the cost of valuation litigation and increase the ...


Apologies And Legal Settlement: An Empirical Examination, Jennifer K. Robbennolt Dec 2003

Apologies And Legal Settlement: An Empirical Examination, Jennifer K. Robbennolt

Michigan Law Review

It is often said that U.S. legal culture discourages apologies. Defendants, defense counsel, and insurers worry that statements of apology will be admissible at trial and will be interpreted by jurors and judges as admissions of responsibility. In recent years, however, several legal commentators have suggested that disputants in civil lawsuits should be encouraged to apologize to opposing parties. They claim that apologies will avert lawsuits and promote settlement. Consistent with this view, legislatures in several states have enacted statutes that are intended to encourage and protect apologies by making them inadmissible. In addition, some commentators argue that defendants ...


The Indulgence Of Reasonable Presumptions: Federal Court Contractual Civil Jury Trial Waivers, Joel Andersen Oct 2003

The Indulgence Of Reasonable Presumptions: Federal Court Contractual Civil Jury Trial Waivers, Joel Andersen

Michigan Law Review

Large institutions such as banks, franchisers, international companies, and lessors distrust juries' ability to properly resolve disputes and award reasonable damages. As a result, these and other actors have attempted to limit juries' potential influence on the contracts to which they are parties. They have done so through contractual jury trial waiver clauses in these agreements. The Seventh Amendment to the Constitution guarantees the jury trial right. Whether the right is determined to exist in an individual instance is a matter of federal common law, which merely preserves the jury trial right as it existed when the Amendment was adopted ...


The Exclusion Of Felons From Jury Service, Brian C. Kalt Oct 2003

The Exclusion Of Felons From Jury Service, Brian C. Kalt

American University Law Review

The lifetime exclusion of felons from jury service is the majority rule in the U.S., used in thirty one states and in federal courts. The result is that over 6% of the adult population is excluded, including about 30% of black men.

The parallel issue of felon disenfranchisement has drawn considerable scholarly attention, despite its lower, declining, and less racially charged numbers. The racial composition of juries has been widely discussed in the literature as well. By contrast, felon jury service has been almost entirely ignored, despite a mass of legislation and appellate litigation, and despite glaring racial disparities ...


Expected Value Arbitration, Joshua P. Davis Sep 2003

Expected Value Arbitration, Joshua P. Davis

ExpressO

This Article proposes a new form of dispute resolution, Expected Value Arbitration or “EVA.” It would award a plaintiff the expected value of the outcome at trial or, in other words, the plaintiff would receive the amount she would recover on average if numerous courts were to decide her claim. EVA’s novel use of expected value gives it several virtues that distinguish it from trial, traditional binding arbitration, and other academic proposals for imposed compromise: first, EVA allows parties to insist on their legal rights without braving the risks of winner-take-all adjudication; second, it minimizes errors in adjudication; and ...


Mass Toxic Tort Litigation And Class Action Rule Reform In The United States, Jason L. Betts Sep 2003

Mass Toxic Tort Litigation And Class Action Rule Reform In The United States, Jason L. Betts

ExpressO

The paper advances the proposition that mass toxic tort litigation has been the predominant driver of class action rule reform in the Unites States. Through three distinct phases of proposals to reform Rule 23 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, the judicial and academic attitude to the certification of mass toxic torts has influenced the reform debate in radically different ways – initially by providing the catalyst for efforts to reform Rule 23; then as a dampener against significant reforms to Rule 23 in the wake of mass toxic tort “settlement-only” classes; and ultimately as an explanation for the comparatively ...


Freedom From Fear: Prosecuting The Iraqi Regime For The Use Of Chemical Weapons, Margaret A. Sewell Sep 2003

Freedom From Fear: Prosecuting The Iraqi Regime For The Use Of Chemical Weapons, Margaret A. Sewell

ExpressO

Since the recent war with Iraq, there is a lingering question as to how to prosecute Saddam Hussein (if captured) and the Iraqi regime for their past atrocities, particularly, the use of chemcial weapons against Iran during the Iran-Iraq War and the Kurds. This article provides a background of the crimes committed by the Iraqi regime, a discussion and recommendation of the various proseution fora, as well as a presentation of the evidence that can be used in a prosecution.


Employer Tros Are All The Rage: A New Approach To Workplace Violence, Kyle Riley Sep 2003

Employer Tros Are All The Rage: A New Approach To Workplace Violence, Kyle Riley

Nevada Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Real Options In Law: (Possibly, Frivolous) Litigation And Other Applications, Peter H. Huang Aug 2003

Real Options In Law: (Possibly, Frivolous) Litigation And Other Applications, Peter H. Huang

ExpressO

This Article advances the thesis that real options are not only ubiquitous in law, but also provide novel insights about legal decision making, doctrines and rules. An introduction provides a brief a primer about financial options, real options, and real options in law. Part I of this Article develops implications of the fact that every lawsuit contains a sequence of real options for the plaintiff to unilaterally abandon that lawsuit. Part II of this Article appraises the limitations of game-theoretic analysis of the abandonment options embedded in litigation and some responses to such limitations. Part III of this Article illustrates ...


No Free Lunch: How Settlement Can Reduce The Legal System's Ability To Induce Efficient Behavior, Abraham Lee Wickelgren Aug 2003

No Free Lunch: How Settlement Can Reduce The Legal System's Ability To Induce Efficient Behavior, Abraham Lee Wickelgren

ExpressO

While there is widespread agreement that it is better for cases to settle than go to trial, the arguments in favor of settlement have typically overlooked how settlement affects one of the most important functions of the legal system: influencing the behavior that gives rise to lawsuits. This essay argues that, in some cases, settlement can impair the ability of the legal system to deter harmful behavior without chilling desirable behavior. Where it exists, this effect is a fundamental property of settlement in that there is no way to change other legal rules to eliminate it. Because settlements also have ...


Narrative Highground: The Failure Of Intervention As A Procedural Device In Affirmative Action Litigation, Danielle R. Holley Aug 2003

Narrative Highground: The Failure Of Intervention As A Procedural Device In Affirmative Action Litigation, Danielle R. Holley

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Cuestiones Procesales En La Ley De Defensa De La Competencia, Gabriel Martinez Medrano Aug 2003

Cuestiones Procesales En La Ley De Defensa De La Competencia, Gabriel Martinez Medrano

Gabriel Martinez Medrano

No abstract provided.


Licencias "Atadas" Sobre Derechos Intelectuales Y Defensa De La Competencia., Gabriel Martinez Medrano Aug 2003

Licencias "Atadas" Sobre Derechos Intelectuales Y Defensa De La Competencia., Gabriel Martinez Medrano

Gabriel Martinez Medrano

No abstract provided.


Opening Statement -- Making It Stick, Ronald L. Carlson, Michael S. Carlson Aug 2003

Opening Statement -- Making It Stick, Ronald L. Carlson, Michael S. Carlson

Popular Media

Every lawyer who sits down to plan her opening remarks for a coming trial has the same question: How far can I go in arguing my case during the opening statement? Can I mention the law? What about drawing a diagram of the accident on a blackboard? Will my opponent be able to stop me from displaying a couple of my dramatic exhibits to the jury?

Making one's theory of the case "stick" from the very start of the trial depends mightly on how far the lawyer can go in opening statement. Where the defense is primarily a legal ...


Moot Court Teams 2003-2004, Kellie Casey Monk Aug 2003

Moot Court Teams 2003-2004, Kellie Casey Monk

Materials from All Student Organizations

No abstract provided.


Empirical Research And Civil Jury Reform, Valerie P. Hans, Stephanie Albertson Aug 2003

Empirical Research And Civil Jury Reform, Valerie P. Hans, Stephanie Albertson

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

In January 2003, President George W. Bush invoked the supposed failings of the civil jury as the rationale for sweeping changes to the civil justice system. In a speech given at the University of Scranton, in Pennsylvania, a state where skyrocketing costs of medical malpractice insurance had created a political crisis, President Bush said, "Excessive jury awards will continue to drive up insurance costs, will put good doctors out of Scranton, Pa." Among the changes he proposed were a decrease in the time that patients would have to sue their doctors, a national cap on pain and suffering awards at ...


“Black People’S Money”: The Impact Of Law, Economics, And Culture In The Context Of Race On Damage Recoveries, Regina Austin Jul 2003

“Black People’S Money”: The Impact Of Law, Economics, And Culture In The Context Of Race On Damage Recoveries, Regina Austin

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

“’Black People’s Money’: The Impact of Law, Economics, and Culture in the Context of Race on Damage Recoveries” is one of a series of articles by the author dealing with black economic marginalization; prior work considered such topics as shopping and selling as forms of deviance, street vending, restraints on leisure, and the importance of informality in loan transactions. This article deals with the linkage between the social significance of black people’s money and its material value. It analyzes the construction of “black money,” its association with cash, and the taboos and cultural practices that assure that black ...


The Impact Of Clergy Sexual Misconduct Litigation On Religious Liberty, Patrick J. Schiltz Jul 2003

The Impact Of Clergy Sexual Misconduct Litigation On Religious Liberty, Patrick J. Schiltz

Boston College Law Review

The harm that the direct. victims of clergy sexual misconduct have suffered has been the subject of extensive publicity. By contrast, the harm that the indirect victims suffer has received little attention. This Article identifies and discusses the costs—to those who belong to churches and to those who are served by churches—of using litigation to bring about compensation for victims of clergy sexual misconduct. These costs include loss of monetary resources a church would otherwise use for religious, charitable, or educational purposes; the possibility of a ministry not representative of the people it serves; decreased positive interactions between ...


The Litigation To Redefine Marriage: Equality And Social Meaning , William C. Duncan Jul 2003

The Litigation To Redefine Marriage: Equality And Social Meaning , William C. Duncan

Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law

No abstract provided.


What Is A Reasonable Attorney Fee? An Empirical Study Of Class Action Settlements, Theodore Eisenberg, Geoffrey P. Miller Jul 2003

What Is A Reasonable Attorney Fee? An Empirical Study Of Class Action Settlements, Theodore Eisenberg, Geoffrey P. Miller

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

Determining an appropriate fee is a difficult task facing trial court judges in class action litigation. But courts rarely rely on empirical research to assess a fee’s reasonableness, due, at least in part, to the relative paucity of available information. Existing empirical studies of attorney fees in class action cases are limited in scope, and generally do not control for important variables. To help fill this gap, we analyzed data from all state and federal class actions with reported fee decisions from 1993 to 2002 in which the fee and class recovery could be determined with reasonable confidence.

We ...


Agenda: Water Negotiation Workshop, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center, William & Flora Hewlett Foundation Jun 2003

Agenda: Water Negotiation Workshop, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center, William & Flora Hewlett Foundation

Water Negotiation Workshop (June 4-5)

"Sponsored by: The Natural Resources law Center of the University of Colorado Law School; Funding provided by: The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation."

"Facilitators: Lucy Moore and Steve Snyder."

"June 4 and 5, 2003, Community House, Chautauqua Park, Boulder, Colorado."

Contents:

Agenda -- Roster of workshop participants -- Biographies of workshop participants -- Maps of Klamath basin -- Key water-related events in the upper Klamath basin -- Federal-state decisionmaking on water : applying lessons learned / David J. Hayes -- Turbulence in the Klamath River basin / Sharon Levy


Maps Of The Klamath Basin And Key Water-Related Events In The Upper Klamath Basin, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center Jun 2003

Maps Of The Klamath Basin And Key Water-Related Events In The Upper Klamath Basin, University Of Colorado Boulder. Natural Resources Law Center

Water Negotiation Workshop (June 4-5)

5 pages.

Contents:

Maps of Klamath Basin -- Key water-related events in the Upper Klamath Basin

Excerpted from: Ron Hathaway & Teresa Welch, Water Allocation in the Klamath Reclamation Project, 2001: An Assessment of Natural Resource, Economic, Social, and Institutional Issues with a Focus on the Upper Klamath Basin 31-34, 43 (Oregon State University, University of California, reprinted May 2003). Full report available in Klamath Waters Digital Library at http://digitallib.oit.edu/cdm/ref/collection/kwl/id/9442.


Satellite Digital Audio Radio Searching For Novel Theories Of Action, Daniel H. Erskine May 2003

Satellite Digital Audio Radio Searching For Novel Theories Of Action, Daniel H. Erskine

Daniel H. Erskine

Satellite radio may be becoming increasingly popular, but there is a little known drawback to the technology: it interferes with many existing wireless networks in place, such as cellular telephone service. This article looks at the legal implications that this interference causes and what kind of liability satellite operators like Sirius and XM Radio may face. Erskine includes a detailed description of how satellite radio operates and in turn describes how this operation causes the disruption. He then moves into a discussion of the current law surrounding the technology and different theories of liability, including tort theories. His approach is ...


Why Do Distressed Companies Choose Delaware? An Empirical Analysis Of Venue Choice In Bankruptcy , Kenneth M. Ayotte, David A. Skeel Jr. May 2003

Why Do Distressed Companies Choose Delaware? An Empirical Analysis Of Venue Choice In Bankruptcy , Kenneth M. Ayotte, David A. Skeel Jr.

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

We analyze a sample of large Chapter 11 cases to determine which factors motivate the choice of filing in one court over another when a choice is available. We focus in particular on the Delaware court, which became the most popular venue for large corporations in the 1990s. We find no evidence of agency problems governing the venue choice or affecting the outcome of the bankruptcy process. Instead, firm characteristics and court characteristics, particularly a court's level of experience, are the most important factors. We find that court experience manifests itself in both a greater ability to reorganize marginal ...


Just What The Doctor Ordered: The Admissibility Of Differential Diagnosis In Pharmaceutical Product Litigation, Wendy Michelle Ertmer May 2003

Just What The Doctor Ordered: The Admissibility Of Differential Diagnosis In Pharmaceutical Product Litigation, Wendy Michelle Ertmer

Vanderbilt Law Review

In the decade since Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc., federal judges have exercised their role as gatekeepers of expert witness testimony to evaluate many different categories of scientific evidence. They have not done so without controversy, however. Because the element of causation in pharmaceutical product litigation is frequently dispositive, the application of Daubert to scientific evidence of causation has been particularly contentious. Plaintiffs in such cases must prove both general causation-that the product is capable of causing an injury of the type from which the plaintiff suffers-and specific causation-that the product was the actual cause of the plaintiffs injury ...


Race And The Georgia Courts: Implications Of The Georgia Public Trust And Confidence Survey For Batson V. Kentucky And Its Progeny, George W. Dougherty, Randy Beck, Mark D. Bradbury Apr 2003

Race And The Georgia Courts: Implications Of The Georgia Public Trust And Confidence Survey For Batson V. Kentucky And Its Progeny, George W. Dougherty, Randy Beck, Mark D. Bradbury

Scholarly Works

Put simply, there is a perception among many Georgians that the court system treats minorities worse than whites. This Essay considers implications of the Georgia findings for a line of United States Supreme Court decisions designed to prevent racial discrimination by trial lawyers in the selection of trial juries.


Applications For Certificates Of Appealability And The Supreme Court's "Obligatory" Jurisdiction, Brent E. Newton Apr 2003

Applications For Certificates Of Appealability And The Supreme Court's "Obligatory" Jurisdiction, Brent E. Newton

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Advocacy Before The United States Supreme Court, Robert H. Jackson Apr 2003

Advocacy Before The United States Supreme Court, Robert H. Jackson

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Lay Participation In Legal Decision Making: Introduction To Law & Policy Special Issue, Valerie P. Hans Apr 2003

Lay Participation In Legal Decision Making: Introduction To Law & Policy Special Issue, Valerie P. Hans

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

United States scholarship on lay participation revolves around one predominant form of lay participation, the jury (Hans & Vidmar forthcoming 2004). However, in the legal systems of many countries, laypeople participate as decision makers in other ways. Laypersons serve as judges (Provine 1986), magistrates (Diamond 1993), and private prosecutors (Perez Gil 2003). Lay and law-trained judges may also decide cases together in mixed tribunals (Kutnjak Ivkovi6 2003; Machura 2003; Vidmar 2002). Although diverse in structure, these methods share with the jury a set of animating ideas about lay involvement in legal decision making.

Many of these ideas appear to be quite compelling. But despite an extensive body of scholarship on the functioning of the jury system, there is limited scholarly work on how alternative methods of using laypersons in legal decision making operate in practice. There is even less on the political and social impact of lay participation. Whether diverse ...


The Government As Litigant: Further Tests Of The Case Selection Model, Theodore Eisenberg, Henry Farber Apr 2003

The Government As Litigant: Further Tests Of The Case Selection Model, Theodore Eisenberg, Henry Farber

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

We develop a model of the plaintiff's decision to file a lawsuit that has implications for how differences between the federal government and private litigants translate into differences in trial rates and plaintiff win rates at trial. Our case selection model generates a set of predictions for relative trial rates and plaintiff win rates, depending on the type of case and whether the government is defendant or plaintiff. To test the model, we use data on about 474,000 cases filed in federal district court between 1979 and 1994 in the areas of personal injury and job discrimination, in ...