Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Law

Exemplary Legal Writing 2016: Books Selected By Our Respectable Authorities: Five Recommendations, Femi Cadmus Jan 2017

Exemplary Legal Writing 2016: Books Selected By Our Respectable Authorities: Five Recommendations, Femi Cadmus

Faculty Scholarship

A brief review of five recommended exemplary legal books published in 2017.


Exemplary Law Books Of 2015: Five Recommendations, Femi Cadmus Jan 2016

Exemplary Law Books Of 2015: Five Recommendations, Femi Cadmus

Faculty Scholarship

A brief review of five recommended exemplary legal books published in 2015.


Increased Importance Of Legal Writing In The Era Of “The Vanishing Trial”, Edward D. Re Dec 2014

Increased Importance Of Legal Writing In The Era Of “The Vanishing Trial”, Edward D. Re

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


A Proposal To The Aba: Integrating Legal Writing And Experiential Learning Into A Required, Six-Semester Curriculum That Trains Students In Core Competencies, 'Soft Skills,' And Real-World Judgment, Adam Lamparello, Charles E. Maclean Jun 2014

A Proposal To The Aba: Integrating Legal Writing And Experiential Learning Into A Required, Six-Semester Curriculum That Trains Students In Core Competencies, 'Soft Skills,' And Real-World Judgment, Adam Lamparello, Charles E. Maclean

Adam Lamparello

Experiential learning is not the answer to the problems facing legal education. Simulations, externships, and clinics are vital aspects of a real-world legal education, but they cannot alone produce competent graduates. The better approach is to create a required, six-semester experiential legal writing curriculum where students draft and re-draft the most common litigation documents and engage in simulations, including client interviews, mediation, depositions, settlement negotiations, and oral arguments in the order that they would in actual practice. In so doing, law schools can provide the time and context within which students can truly learn to think like lawyers, do what ...


A Proposal To The Aba: One Required Legal Writing Course For All Six Semesters Of Law School, Adam Lamparello Apr 2014

A Proposal To The Aba: One Required Legal Writing Course For All Six Semesters Of Law School, Adam Lamparello

Adam Lamparello

If you decide to run a marathon, but stop training after the eighth week of a sixteen-week training schedule, you will not finish. Why? Your muscles atrophied, and your stamina declined. If you stop writing after the second or third semester of law school, you will not become a good legal writer. Why? Your skills atrophied. You did not develop mental memory—just like the marathon runner did not develop muscle memory.

Why did the marathon runner stop? Maybe life got in the way, or training became too hard. But it’s the difficult moments—the grind—that separates the ...


No Shoehorn Required: How A Required, Three-Year, Persuasion-Based Legal Writing Program Easily Fits Within The Broader Law School Curriculum, Adam Lamparello, Charles Maclean Jan 2014

No Shoehorn Required: How A Required, Three-Year, Persuasion-Based Legal Writing Program Easily Fits Within The Broader Law School Curriculum, Adam Lamparello, Charles Maclean

Adam Lamparello

In prior articles, we advocated for a required fifteen-credit, three-year, persuasion-based, linear legal writing curriculum. Our model begins with persuasive advocacy from the first day of law school, and takes a sequential approach that mirrors the practice of law — from the initial client meeting to the appellate brief.

It includes a separate track for those interested in transactional work, incorporates alternative dispute resolution and settlement simulations, and involves students in researching and drafting amicus briefs before federal appellate courts. Students are also offered several electives each semester to complement their required course load, and receive intense training in narrative storytelling ...


Designing Spaces: Planning The Physical Space For A Legal Writing Program, Jan M. Levine Dec 2013

Designing Spaces: Planning The Physical Space For A Legal Writing Program, Jan M. Levine

Jan M. Levine

Very little has been written about designing new law school buildings or renovating existing law school buildings. There are a handful of articles about the process of building a new law school, or about a dean’s legacy being reflected in a building. Other articles have been written about designing law school libraries, and about building law libraries for other patrons. Law school rankings often reflect student satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the school’s physical plant. But almost nothing has been published about creating spaces for skills-based programs such as clinics7 and writing programs, despite the special considerations that apply ...


Silence Is Golden: Using A "Silent Scrolling Powerpoint" Series To Enhance Your Course Dynamic, Julia M. Glencer Professor Dec 2012

Silence Is Golden: Using A "Silent Scrolling Powerpoint" Series To Enhance Your Course Dynamic, Julia M. Glencer Professor

Julia M. Glencer

This article explores the use of an alternative teaching tool in a law school classroom as a method of inspiring law students and prompting excited engagement in both the underlying course and the legal profession. The author, a seven-year Legal Research & Writing Professor, first explains how she has used the automatic advance feature in Microsoft PowerPoint to create a semester series of weekly “Silent Scrolling PowerPoints,” 5 to 7 minutes in length, on a variety of topics of interest and inspiration to her first-year law students. She then summarizes the six benefits observed while experimenting with this tool over a ...


A Call To Combine Rhetorical Theory And Practice In The Legal Writing Classroom, Kristen Konrad Robbins-Tiscione Apr 2011

A Call To Combine Rhetorical Theory And Practice In The Legal Writing Classroom, Kristen Konrad Robbins-Tiscione

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The theory and practice of law have been separated in legal education to their detriment since the turn of the twentieth century. As history teaches us and even the 2007 Carnegie Report perhaps suggests, teaching practice without theory is as inadequate as teaching theory without practice. Just as law students should learn how to draft a simple contract from taking Contracts, they should learn the theory of persuasion from taking a legal writing course. In an economy where law apprenticeship has reverted from employer to educator, legal writing courses should do more than teach analysis, conventional documents, and the social ...


Helping Students Develop A Humanistic Philosophy Of Lawyering, Beth Cohen Jan 2006

Helping Students Develop A Humanistic Philosophy Of Lawyering, Beth Cohen

Faculty Scholarship

This Article considers the need to help students develop a cohesive philosophy of lawyering and suggests some ideas and methods to help introduce these concepts and concerns to students. Although this Article focuses primarily on aspects of the legal research and writing curriculum and pedagogy as well as professional development programs that can enhance the curriculum, the concepts are applicable and transferable to other subjects and courses. The purpose of this Article is to explore the issues raised by a conscious decision to help students consider and develop a beneficial philosophy of lawyering in areas including the development of legal ...


Using A Literary Case Study To Teach Lawyering Skills: How We Used Damages By Barry Werth In The First-Year Legal Writing Curriculum, Jeanne M. Kaiser, Myra Orlen Dec 2005

Using A Literary Case Study To Teach Lawyering Skills: How We Used Damages By Barry Werth In The First-Year Legal Writing Curriculum, Jeanne M. Kaiser, Myra Orlen

Faculty Scholarship

First-year law students arrive for their first day of classes with varying perceptions about the practice of law and what it means to be a lawyer. Although some students have first-hand knowledge of the profession based on their work in a law office or from family members who are attorneys, many students base their entire conception of what it means to be a lawyer on images from popular media. The Authors discuss how they used a literary account to acquaint students with an authentic picture of litigation, while still teaching the rudiments of legal research and writing. The book used ...


An Elective Advanced Course, Beth Cohen, Jeanne Kaiser Jan 2002

An Elective Advanced Course, Beth Cohen, Jeanne Kaiser

Media Presence

This Article discusses the experiences of offering an Advanced Legal Research and Writing tutorial as an elective at Western New England College School of Law. This course is taught by a member of the Legal Research and Writing faculty on a rotating basis. This elective course allows students the opportunity to research and write for another semester of law school.


Modeling: Placing Persuasion In Context, Myra G. Orlen Jan 2001

Modeling: Placing Persuasion In Context, Myra G. Orlen

Faculty Scholarship

The Author discusses the use of a contextual model to teach persuasion and its proven success in first year classes at Western New England College School of Law.


Commenting On Student Writing, Beth Cohen, Jocelyn Cuffee, Harris Freeman, Jeanne Kaiser, Myra Orlen Jan 1999

Commenting On Student Writing, Beth Cohen, Jocelyn Cuffee, Harris Freeman, Jeanne Kaiser, Myra Orlen

Media Presence

This Article, written by the five-person faculty in the legal research and writing program at Western New England College, discusses the process of critiquing student work. They share some ideas they have discussed in order to promote good legal writing.


Commenting On Student Writing, Beth Cohen, Jocelyn Cuffee, Harris Freeman, Jeanne M. Kaiser, Myra G. Orlen Jan 1999

Commenting On Student Writing, Beth Cohen, Jocelyn Cuffee, Harris Freeman, Jeanne M. Kaiser, Myra G. Orlen

Faculty Scholarship

The Authors from Western New England College School of Law discuss perspectives on and approaches to responding to student writing.


Reflections Of Irac, Beth Cohen, Chris Iijima Jan 1995

Reflections Of Irac, Beth Cohen, Chris Iijima

Media Presence

The authors agree that IRAC provides a good starting point to explain the components of legal argument. It requires students to present a good, clear statement of law, a clear and affirmative statement of the issue, an articulation of applicable rules, an analysis and an application of facts to rules of law, and a statement of the ultimate conclusion or prediction. These elements are essential components of good legal writing that should be contained in all good and thorough legal writing from inter-office memoranda and persuasive court briefs to law school exams.