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Full-Text Articles in Law

Heights Of Justice (Introduction And Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham Dec 2005

Heights Of Justice (Introduction And Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

In this pioneering book, Boston College Law School’s Academic Dean, Lawrence Cunningham, arranges selected contributions of his faculty’s scholarship into a meditation upon justice. The book weaves a combination of theory and practice to articulate moral and ethical values that facilitate rational application of law. It envisions legal arrangements imbued with commitments of the Jesuit tradition, including the dignity of persons, the common good and compassion for the poor. This reflective collection of inquiry evokes a signature motif of the BC Law faculty in dozens of different legal subjects. Materials downloadable from this abstract consist of: Table of ...


How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds (Duke University Press 2005), Jean Stefancic, Richard Delgado Nov 2005

How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds (Duke University Press 2005), Jean Stefancic, Richard Delgado

University of Pittsburgh School of Law Working Paper Series

This is an excerpt from How Lawyer’s Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds. Professors Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado use historical investigation and critical analysis to diagnose the cause of the pervasive unhappiness among practicing lawyers. Most previous writers have blamed the high rate of burnout, depression, divorce, and drug and alcohol dependency among these highly paid professionals on the narrow specialization, long hours, and intense pressures of modern legal practice. Stefancic and Delgado argue that these professional demands are only symptoms of a deeper problem: the way lawyers are taught to think and reason. They ...


Readers' Expectations, Discourse Communities, And Writing Effective Bar Exam Answers, Denise D. Riebe Nov 2005

Readers' Expectations, Discourse Communities, And Writing Effective Bar Exam Answers, Denise D. Riebe

ExpressO

This article advocates that law schools should provide bar exam preparation for students, including instruction regarding effective writing for bar exams. Using the reader expectation approach and considering the unique conventions of the legal profession's discourse community as a theoretical backdrop, this article examines effective writing for bar exams. It also provides practical recommendations for instructing students to write effective bar exam answers.


Law And Accounting: Cases And Materials (Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham Sep 2005

Law And Accounting: Cases And Materials (Front Matter), Lawrence A. Cunningham

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Accounting textbooks for law or business schools invariably provide secondary narrative presentations of materials in the authors’ own words. A better approach to learning this subject is to present thematically arranged original accounting pronouncements. In so designing this innovative book, readers appreciate how accounting is a tool that provides conceptual organization to economic exchange. The tool facilitates analyzing legal, business and public policy aspects of the transactions that accounting addresses. The original accounting standards, as well as SEC enforcement actions, presented in this book illuminate why transactions are pursued and related decisions made, economic aspects of transactions, and the conceptual ...


Lawyers And Learning: A Metacognitive Approach To Legal Education, Anthony S. Niedwiecki Sep 2005

Lawyers And Learning: A Metacognitive Approach To Legal Education, Anthony S. Niedwiecki

ExpressO

The article discusses how the current methods of teaching law students hinder their ability to transfer the knowledge and skills learned in law school to the practice of law. I propose integrating learning theory into the law school curriculum, with a specific focus on teaching metacognitive skills. Generally, metacognition refers to having both an awareness of and control over one’s learning and thinking. Professors can help the students gain an awareness of their learning by focusing the students on which learning preferences and experiences they bring to law school and how they can match them to the skills required ...


Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor Sep 2005

Breaking The Bank: Revisiting Central Bank Of Denver After Enron And Sarbanes-Oxley, Celia Taylor

ExpressO

No abstract provided.


Keeping Students Interested While Teaching Citation, Anna P. Hemingway Jul 2005

Keeping Students Interested While Teaching Citation, Anna P. Hemingway

Anna P. Hemingway

No abstract provided.


"I See And I Remember; I Do And Understand": Teaching Fundamental Structure In Legal Writing Through The Use Of Samples, Judith B. Tracy Jun 2005

"I See And I Remember; I Do And Understand": Teaching Fundamental Structure In Legal Writing Through The Use Of Samples, Judith B. Tracy

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

A first-year legal reasoning and writing curriculum is designed to introduce students to the analytical skills and organizational tools needed for the preparation of effective objective and then persuasive documents. This article describes how to use samples to enable students to self-identify a general, logical structure for a document, considering its content, its audience and purpose, and the realities of legal practice.


'The Reasonable Zone Of Right Answers': Analytical Feedback On Student Writing, Jane Kent Gionfriddo Mar 2005

'The Reasonable Zone Of Right Answers': Analytical Feedback On Student Writing, Jane Kent Gionfriddo

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This article develops the theory behind and practice of written analytical feedback on student writing for law practice. After Section I, which provides an introduction, Section II discusses the theory. It begins by addressing the function of legal writing classes in teaching students how to produce the kind of accurate and precise analysis that is the necessary foundation for documents useful in law practice. The section then goes on to discuss how this focus on analysis requires legal writing teachers to play a dual role—that of a legal educator as well as reader in law practice—in providing written ...