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Legal Writing and Research

Jackson Nyamuya Maogoto

International Criminal Law

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Law

The Final Balance Sheet? The International Criminal Court’S Challenges And Concessions To The Westphalian Model, Jackson N. Maogoto Jan 2004

The Final Balance Sheet? The International Criminal Court’S Challenges And Concessions To The Westphalian Model, Jackson N. Maogoto

Jackson Nyamuya Maogoto

This Article examines the organization and operating principles of the Court. Many aspects of the Rome Statute challenge fundamental tenets of the structure of international law existing heretofore. No analysis could address all the aspects of this new international institution and the Article seeks to focus attention on some of its major features impacting on State sovereignty--the focus of this Article. Part II of the Article explores the structure and competence of the Court and in particular the powers of the prosecutor, general principles underlying the jurisdiction of the Court, the formulation of the complementarity principle in the Court’s ...


Presiding Over The Ex-President: A Look At Superior Responsibility In The Light Of The Kosovo Indictment, Jackson N. Maogoto Jan 2002

Presiding Over The Ex-President: A Look At Superior Responsibility In The Light Of The Kosovo Indictment, Jackson N. Maogoto

Jackson Nyamuya Maogoto

Individual criminal responsibility, and command responsibility in particular, are important because, to deter human rights abuses, potential perpetrators must perceive prosecution as a possible consequence of their actions. Historically, the doctrine of command responsibility has been an important tool to hold accountable leaders who plan, participate in, or acquiesce in large-scale human rights abuses. The scope of the command responsibility doctrine remains one of the most important issues in prosecuting human rights atrocities. The scope of the doctrine determines the degree to which a leader can insulate himself from criminal culpability when the criminal acts were committed by others but ...