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Legal Writing and Research

Selected Works

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Law

Why Write?, Erwin Chemerinsky Jun 2017

Why Write?, Erwin Chemerinsky

Erwin Chemerinsky

This wonderful collection of reviews of leading recent books about law provides the occasion to ask a basic question: why should law professors write? There are many things that law professors could do with the time they spend writing books and law review articles. More time and attention could be paid to students and to instructional materials. More professors could do pro bono legal work of all sorts. In fact, if law professors wrote much less, teaching loads could increase, faculties could decrease in size, and tuition could decrease substantially. The answer to the question "why write" is neither intuitive ...


Overcoming Writer's Block And Procrastination For Attorneys, Law Students, And Law Professors, Meehan Rasch Dec 2012

Overcoming Writer's Block And Procrastination For Attorneys, Law Students, And Law Professors, Meehan Rasch

Meehan Rasch

Law is a particularly writing-heavy profession. However, lawyers, law students, and law professors often struggle with initiating, sustaining, and completing legal writing projects. Even the most competent legal professionals experience periods in which the written word just does not flow freely. This article provides a guide for legal writers who are seeking to understand and resolve writing blocks, procrastination, and other common writing productivity problems.


Tough Love: The Law School That Required Its Students To Learn Good Grammar, Ann Nowak Nov 2012

Tough Love: The Law School That Required Its Students To Learn Good Grammar, Ann Nowak

Ann L. Nowak

No abstract provided.


Keeping Feminism In Its Place: Sex Segregation And The Domestication Of Female Academics, Nancy Levit Dec 2000

Keeping Feminism In Its Place: Sex Segregation And The Domestication Of Female Academics, Nancy Levit

Nancy Levit

The thesis of Keeping Feminism in Its Place is that women are being "domesticated" in the legal academy. This occurs in two ways, one theoretical and one very practical: denigration of feminism on the theoretical level and sex segregation of men and women on the experiential level intertwine to disadvantage women in academia in complex and subtle ways.

The article examines occupational sex segregation and role differentiation between male and female law professors, demonstrating statistically that in legal academia, women are congregated in lower-ranking, lower-paying, lower-prestige positions. It also traces how segregation by sex persists in substantive course teaching assignments ...