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2006

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Law

Paper Session Iv: Development And Delivery Of Coursework - The Legal/Regulatory/Policy Environment Of Cyberforensics, John W. Bagby, John C. Ruhnka Apr 2006

Paper Session Iv: Development And Delivery Of Coursework - The Legal/Regulatory/Policy Environment Of Cyberforensics, John W. Bagby, John C. Ruhnka

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

This paper describes a cyber-forensics course that integrates important public policy and legal issues as well as relevant forensic techniques. Cyber-forensics refers to the amalgam of multi-disciplinary activities involved in the identification, gathering, handling, custody, use and security of electronic files and records, involving expertise from the forensic domain, and which produces evidence useful in the proof of facts for both commercial and legal activities. The legal and regulatory environment in which electronic discovery takes place is of critical importance to cyber-forensics experts because the legal process imposes both constraints and opportunities for the effective use of evidence gathered through ...


Paper Session V: Steganography And Terrorist Communications - Current Information And Trends - Tools, Analysis And Future Directions In Steganalysis In Context With Terrorists And Other Criminals, William Eyre, Marcus Rogers Apr 2006

Paper Session V: Steganography And Terrorist Communications - Current Information And Trends - Tools, Analysis And Future Directions In Steganalysis In Context With Terrorists And Other Criminals, William Eyre, Marcus Rogers

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

In ancient times, users communicated using steganography, “…derived from the Greek words steganos, meaning ‘covered’, and graphein, meaning ‘to write.’” (Singh, 1999, p.5) Steganography facilitates secret, undetected communication. In modern times, in the context of the Global War on Terror, national intelligence and law enforcement agencies need tools to detect hidden information (steganography) in various types of media, most specifically to uncover the placement of hidden information in images. This paper will look at steganography in general terms, presenting the theory of some common steganographic techniques and touching on some theoretical work in steganography. Then a discussion of how ...


Paper Session V: Forensic Software Tools For Cell Phone Subscriber Identity Modules, Wayne Jansen, Rick Ayers Apr 2006

Paper Session V: Forensic Software Tools For Cell Phone Subscriber Identity Modules, Wayne Jansen, Rick Ayers

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

Cell phones and other handheld devices incorporating cell phone capabilities (e.g., smart phones) are ubiquitous. Besides placing calls, cell phones allow users to perform other tasks such as text messaging and phonebook entry management. When cell phones and cellular devices are involved in a crime or other incident, forensic specialists require tools that allow the proper retrieval and speedy examination of data present on the device. For devices conforming to the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) standards, certain data such as dialed numbers, text messages, and phonebook entries are maintained on a Subscriber Identity Module (SIM). This paper ...


Paper Session Iv: Toward Understanding Digital Forensics As A Profession: Defining Curricular Needs (***Research In Process ***), Michelle Wolf, Alan Shafer, Michael Gendron Apr 2006

Paper Session Iv: Toward Understanding Digital Forensics As A Profession: Defining Curricular Needs (***Research In Process ***), Michelle Wolf, Alan Shafer, Michael Gendron

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

This research paper presents research in process which attempts to define the common body of knowledge (CBK) of digital forensics. Digital forensics is not well defined not does it have a generally accepted CBK. The first three phases of completed research, in a four-phase research process are discussed. The early results have created a preliminary CBK, and final validation is underway.


Paper Session Ii: Forensic Scene Documentation Using Mobile Technology, Ibrahim Baggili Apr 2006

Paper Session Ii: Forensic Scene Documentation Using Mobile Technology, Ibrahim Baggili

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

This paper outlines a framework for integrating forensic scene documentation with mobile technology. Currently there are no set standards for documenting a forensic scene. Nonetheless, there is a conceptual framework that forensic scientists and engineers use that includes note taking, scene sketches, photographs, video, and voice interview recordings. This conceptual framework will be the basis that a mobile forensic scene documentation software system is built on. A mobile software system for documenting a forensic scene may help in standardizing forensic scene documentation by regulating the data collection and documentation processes for various forensic disciplines.


Paper Session Iii: Research Brief: A Curriculum For Teaching Information Technology Investigative Techniques For Auditors, Grover S. Kearns, Elizabeth V. Mulig Apr 2006

Paper Session Iii: Research Brief: A Curriculum For Teaching Information Technology Investigative Techniques For Auditors, Grover S. Kearns, Elizabeth V. Mulig

Annual ADFSL Conference on Digital Forensics, Security and Law

Recent prosecutions of highly publicized white-collar crimes combined with public outrage have resulted in heightened regulation and greater emphasis on systems of internal control. Because both white-collar and cybercrimes are usually perpetrated through computers, auditors’ knowledge of information technology (IT) is now more vital than ever. However, preserving digital evidence and investigative techniques, which can be essential to fraud examinations, are not skills frequently taught in accounting programs. Furthermore, many students are not instructed in the use of computer assisted auditing tools and techniques – applications that might uncover fraudulent activity. Only a limited number of university-level accounting classes provide instruction ...