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Full-Text Articles in Law

Tribute: Dores Mccrary Mccree, David L. Chambers Jan 2011

Tribute: Dores Mccrary Mccree, David L. Chambers

Articles

Dores McCree made your day a little better whenever she walked into a room. When you talked with her, you knew her goal was simply to enjoy your company, not to get something out of you, and not to show herself off. She was good at talking and good at listening. She'd cock her head slightly and ask questions to which she really cared about the answers. On more than one occasion, I had to jockey with others to be able to sit with her at a dinner.


Dores Mccree, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2011

Dores Mccree, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Dores McCree had an unusual combination of great qualities. She was totally dedicated to her role as a career advisor to students at the Law School and relentlessly persistent in pursuing opportunities for them among her large, nationwide group of lawyer friends. Yet she could be very hard-headed and realistic in appraising the qualifications of an individual candidate for a particular position. "John or Mary," she would say in that warm, disarming, and totally persuasive voice of hers, "I just don't think that job is the right fit for you. Let's find something better."


Eric Stein, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2011

Eric Stein, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Eric Stein was one of the wisest, shrewdest, most broadly knowledgeable, and most benign human beings I have ever known. Since others can speak more authoritatively about Eric's scholarship and his contributions to international law, I am going to concentrate on him personally and on his relationships with his Michigan Law School colleagues.


The Filaments Of The Vicarious, Jospeh Vining Jan 2010

The Filaments Of The Vicarious, Jospeh Vining

Articles

Forty years is the unit of work in focus here. You have or will have units of forty years of your own, a unit of work like this. I hope what you are doing for me is also for you and your work and your encourage-ment about the decades behind you or to come. I can best respond to your generosity with a look back at the course of this effort of mine and its internal and external connections over time, to illustrate and help us keep in mind the way we mutually influence each other in our thought and ...


The Articulate Frank Allen, James J. White Jan 2008

The Articulate Frank Allen, James J. White

Articles

Frank Allen had all of the wonderful talents that Ted St. Antoine and Rick Lempert ascribe to him. He was exceptionally smart and thoughtful (no one gets to give those fancy lectures who is not). He was a wise man (he led the faculty through the tough times at the end of the Vietnam War). And he was compassionate but tough as nails (he favored affirmative action, but was willing to close down the BAM affirmative action disruption with police if necessary-Frank's statement of his intention to call the police after the law school classes were disrupted forced the ...


Francis A. Allen--Dean And Colleague, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2008

Francis A. Allen--Dean And Colleague, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Frank Allen was chosen as Dean at Michigan during my first year on the Law School faculty. I had never met him but my colleagues had provided splendid reports about his work and about him personally. I was also impressed by his response to our inquiry concerning his possible interest in the deanship. He said he had established a couple of conditions for being a dean anywhere. First, it would have to be at a school to which he felt a special attachment. Second, it would have to be at an institution where he felt he could make some particular ...


In Memoriam: Francis A. Allen, Yale Kamisar Jan 2008

In Memoriam: Francis A. Allen, Yale Kamisar

Articles

Francis A. Allen graced the law faculties of five universities in the course of a remarkable, forty-six-year teaching career. In that time, he established himself as one of the half-dozen greatest twentieth century American scholars of criminal law and criminal procedure.


Discovering William Cook: Ten Sources For Reconstructing The Life Of A Lawyer, Margaret A. Leary Jan 2008

Discovering William Cook: Ten Sources For Reconstructing The Life Of A Lawyer, Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Ms. Leary uses a case study to describe ten categories of resources for reconstructing a Manhattan lawyer's life. These resources answer questions about his law practice, scholarship, personal life, personality, values, and philanthropy. The case study uses today's resources to look far back into the details of the life of William W. Cook, who gave his fortune to the University of Michigan Law School.


Francis A. Allen--Architect Of Modern Criminal Procedure Scholarship, Yale Kamisar Jan 2007

Francis A. Allen--Architect Of Modern Criminal Procedure Scholarship, Yale Kamisar

Articles

Francis A. Allen, who spent the last eight years of his distinguished teaching career at the University of Florida, Fredric G. Levin College of Law, died at the age of eighty-seven. He was a leading figure in law teaching, and the legal profession generally, for more than four decades.


Francis A. Allen--The Gainesville Years, Jerold H. Israel Jan 2007

Francis A. Allen--The Gainesville Years, Jerold H. Israel

Articles

If the legal academy had a Hall of Fame, Frank Allen would surely be a first ballot, unanimous selection.' His nominators need only recite the bare-bones record of his career-his publications, his public service, his years of accomplished teaching, and the many honors he received. That record is neatly capsulized in an obituary, published in the Gainesville Sun, largely written by Frank and June's son, Neil (Neil was also Franks's coauthor on Frank's last publication2). In a concise, precise fashion, reminiscent of Frank's own writings, the obituary not only describes Frank's many accomplishments, but also ...


Branch Rickey, '11: Much More Than Pioneering Baseball Leader, Richard D. Friedman Jan 2007

Branch Rickey, '11: Much More Than Pioneering Baseball Leader, Richard D. Friedman

Articles

Branch Rickey is best known as the president and general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers who brought Jackie Robinson into big league baseball in 1947, thus integrating a major American institution seven years before Brown v. Board of Education. Even apart from this heroic step, Rickey would probably be known as the most significant baseball executive ever, primarily for his work with the Dodgers and, earlier, the St. Louis Cardinals; the modern farm system and extensive spring training facilities are chief among his many innovations. Less well known is the fact that Rickey was a 1911 graduate of the University ...


In Memoriam: Francis A. Allen, Yale Kamisar Jan 2007

In Memoriam: Francis A. Allen, Yale Kamisar

Articles

Francis A. Allen graced the law faculties of five universities in the course of a remarkable, forty-six-year teaching career. In that time, he established himself as one of the half-dozen greatest twentieth-century American scholars of criminal law and criminal procedure.


Michigan's First Woman Lawyer: Sarah Killgore Wertman, Margaret A. Leary Mar 2006

Michigan's First Woman Lawyer: Sarah Killgore Wertman, Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Sarah Killgore Wertman was the first woman in the country to both graduate from law school and be admitted to the bar. Thus, she was Michigan's first woman lawyer in two senses: She was the first woman to graduate from the University of Michigan Law School, and the first woman admitted to the Michigan bar. Others preceded her in entering law school, graduating from law school, or being admitted to the bar, but she was the first to accomplish all three. Her story illustrates much about the early days of women in legal education and the practice of law ...


Dick Wellman -- A Personal Remembrance, Lawrence W. Waggoner Jan 2006

Dick Wellman -- A Personal Remembrance, Lawrence W. Waggoner

Articles

Dick Wellman was my teacher, mentor, collaborator, colleague, and friend. My law school class at The University of Michigan Law School voted Dick the most enthusiastic member of the faculty, and he was that. Dick devoted his professional life to teaching and scholarship, as most law professors do, but he had another career: Dick was a key player in the Uniform Law Conference,' an organization dedicated to improving private law and promoting legislative uniformity among the states.2


Yale Kamisar: A Principled Man For All Seasons, Douglas A. Kahn Jan 2005

Yale Kamisar: A Principled Man For All Seasons, Douglas A. Kahn

Articles

Yale Kamisar began his distinguished career as a law professor in 1957 at the University of Minnesota Law School. For three years prior to joining the Minnesota faculty, Yale had been an associate with the Washington, D.C. law firm of Covington & Burling specializing in antitrust law. Understandably, Yale and Minnesota assumed that he would devote the major part of his research and teaching to antitrust. At that time, the study of criminal law was near the bottom of the hierarchy of law school topics, and so young faculty often were assigned the task of teaching criminal law as the ...


Discovering Mr. Cook, Margaret A. Leary Mar 2004

Discovering Mr. Cook, Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Before I begin to tell you some of what I've learned as I've tried to discover Mr. [William W.] Cook, please ponder two questions: What are your feelings about the Law Quad buildings? Think, for example of the first time you entered the Quad; studying in the Reading Room; seeing the snowy Quad for the first time; and socializing in the Dining Room. You probably have a flood of memories connected to these buildings. The Law School has outgrown them in many respects, but the buildings will always be inspirational. Second, let me ask what you know about ...


A Tribute To Ruth G. Blumrosen, Evan H. Caminker Jan 2004

A Tribute To Ruth G. Blumrosen, Evan H. Caminker

Articles

In January 2004, workers everywhere lost a forceful advocate with the death of Ruth Gerber Blumrosen. From the earliest days of her career, Ruth focused her prodigious intellect and indomitable energy on the enduring problem of employment discrimination. Through both her various high-level professional positions and her academic scholarship, she quickly became known for her expertise in this field and her passion for finding solutions. Ruth's research and writing addressed quite a range of employment issues, including wage discrimination, job segregation, downsizing, and employee rights. Ruth previously published three articles with the University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform ...


Seven Habits Of A Highly Effective Scholar, Jerold H. Israel Jan 2004

Seven Habits Of A Highly Effective Scholar, Jerold H. Israel

Articles

Yale Kamisar has been my friend and colleague for almost forty years now, and my first inclination was to write about those relationships, which have meant so much to me. But I know that other friends and colleagues participating in this tribute issue can bring to the description of those relationships far greater skill and far greater eloquence. I have been Yale's coauthor for roughly thirty-five years on his professional "pride and joy" - Modern Criminal Procedure' - and that is another relationship that I could describe with warmth and affection. But Wayne LaFave, who has shared this same role, is ...


Yale Kamisar: Up Close And Personal, William I. Miller Jan 2004

Yale Kamisar: Up Close And Personal, William I. Miller

Articles

Yale is larger than life. And so was his damn crim pro casebook. My first experience of Kamisar was lugging that casebook around in law school. Everyone complained. It outweighed other casebooks by 3-5 pounds on average. Like everything Yale wrote, it was thorough and also featured many excerpts from Kamisar's writings. I must admit they were a pleasure and they stood out like a sore thumb from usual law school fare-for their passion, of course. But mostly because they were so well written. The good writing won me to his cause: yea beleaguered suspect, boo cops.


Memorial: Beverley J. Pooley (1934-2001), Margaret A. Leary Jan 2002

Memorial: Beverley J. Pooley (1934-2001), Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Beverley J. Pooley died at the age of sixty-seven on August 23, 2001, of kidney failure due to complications from pancreatic cancer. His death came shockingly fast, for he had only learned how seriously ill he was the week before. The bare facts about Bev's life cannot begin to describe what he was to the local community, the University of Michigan, and the law school world. Born in England in 1934, he earned B.A. and LL.B. degrees from Cambridge University; and LL.M., S.J.D., and M.A. in Library Science degrees from the University of ...


A Footnote For Jack Dawson, James J. White, David A. Peters Jan 2002

A Footnote For Jack Dawson, James J. White, David A. Peters

Articles

Jack Dawson, known to many at Michigan as Black Jack, taught at the Law School from 1927 to 1958. Much of his work was published in the Michigan Law Review, where he served as a student editor during the 1923-24 academic year. We revisit his work and provide a footnote to his elegant writing on mistake and supervening events. In Part I, we talk a little about Jack the man. In Part II, we recite the nature and significance of his scholarly work. Part III deals briefly with the cases decided in the last twenty years by American courts on ...


Justice Frank Murphy And American Labor Law, Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 2002

Justice Frank Murphy And American Labor Law, Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

Working people and disfavored groups were central concerns of Frank Murphy, the last Michigan Law School graduate to sit on the United States Supreme Court. In the pages of this Review, just over a half century ago, Archibald Cox wrote of him: "It was natural ...th at his judicial work should be most significant in these two fields [labor law and civil rights] and especially in the areas where they coalesce."' In this Essay, after a brief overview of Murphy the man, his days at the University of Michigan, and his career prior to the Court appointment, I shall review ...


For Terry Sandalow - Challenger And Creator, Christina B. Whitman Jan 2001

For Terry Sandalow - Challenger And Creator, Christina B. Whitman

Articles

In the popular imagination, legal education is the experience of sitting in a classroom and being pushed to think deeply by a brilliant and demanding teacher. Some law schools are lucky enough to have a faculty member who actually fulfills this expectation - one professor in particular whose courses are the testing ground for the very best and most engaged students. When I was a student at Michigan in the 1970s, and until his retirement last year at the end of the century, that teacher was Terry Sandalow. For many Michigan graduates, taking Federal Courts or Fourteenth Amendment from Professor Sandalow ...


Memorial: Margaret Althea Goldblatt (1948-2000), Margaret A. Leary Jan 2000

Memorial: Margaret Althea Goldblatt (1948-2000), Margaret A. Leary

Articles

Margaret Goldblatt, who died on June 15, 2000, in Cape Town, South Africa, after a year-long battle with cancer, was a rare combination of librarian and entrepreneur. She had both a sense of humor and a sense of professionalism that endeared her to those who knew her. Many of her colleagues knew her only through telephone and e-mail communications, for she worked the last several years from the office of Ward and Associates, located in the home she shared with her husband Peter Ward and her two children, Clea Goldblatt, age 21, and Zachary Ward, age 11.


John H. Jackson: Master Of Policy - And The Good Life (A Tribute To John Jackson), Theodore J. St. Antoine Jan 1999

John H. Jackson: Master Of Policy - And The Good Life (A Tribute To John Jackson), Theodore J. St. Antoine

Articles

A faculty can make no prouder boast than the claim that some of its members are the preeminent figures in the country in their particular fields. During my years at Michigan, I believe that claim could fairly be made for at least eleven of our colleagues. For obvious reasons, I shall not reveal my complete list. On a celebratory occasion like this, however, I trust it will not seem indiscreet for me to name John Jackson as one of my choices. I shall leave the more nuanced assessments of John's work to the experts. But from my nonspecialist's ...


The Death Of A Friendly Critic, James J. White Jan 1998

The Death Of A Friendly Critic, James J. White

Articles

Our colleague, Andy Watson, died April 2. Andy was one of the handful of preeminent law professor/psychiatrists. In that role he wrote dozens of articles and several important books, including Psychiatry for Lawyers, a widely used text. I do not write to remind us of his scholarly work, of his strength as a clinical and classroom teacher, or of his prominence as a forensic psychiatrist. I write to remind us of his powerful criticism of our teaching. On the occasion of his death, it is right to recognize his influence on the law school curriculum and to consider whether ...


In Appreciation Of Ted St. Antoine, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1998

In Appreciation Of Ted St. Antoine, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

As I began to think of what I might say this evening, it occurred to me that I was fortunate the occasion had not been billed as a roast. It would not be easy - and, indeed, might be sacrilegious - to direct attention to the foibles of a man whom thousands call "the Saint." That title, by which he has been known by generations of students, is, of course, a measure of their affection and their esteem for him. For more than three decades, Ted has been one of our most popular teachers. Although I have learned a great deal from ...


Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1998

Ted St. Antoine: An Appreciation, Terrance Sandalow

Articles

Ted's skills as a negotiator and mediator and the soundness of his judgment played a vitally important role not only in bringing the issues to a happy conclusion, but in doing so in a way that held the faculty together during a difficult time. Those qualities, together with universal respect for his integrity and confidence that he would not pursue an agenda different from its own, have repeatedly led the faculty to turn to Ted, initially to become its Dean and later to handle a variety of other sensitive assignments.


In Memoriam: Memorial Tributes For Professor Elizabeth B. Clark, Thomas A. Green Jan 1998

In Memoriam: Memorial Tributes For Professor Elizabeth B. Clark, Thomas A. Green

Articles

The first time I met Betsy, now some twenty years'ago, she simply appeared during office hours to ask about being a research assistant. She had finished her first semester of law school, she said, and-as she put it-"there must be something more to it than this." So began Betsy's career as a legal historian; to which she brought a classics background, a powerful mind, prodigious imagination, irony, whimsy, and, to put it mildly, a way with words. Betsy was, of course, a superb student, as Charlie Donahue, Bruce Frier, and I immediately recognized, one from whom one ...


The A Student Who Gave Up The Law For Baseball, Yale Kamisar Jan 1997

The A Student Who Gave Up The Law For Baseball, Yale Kamisar

Articles

When the head coach of the University of Michigan baseball team resigned suddenly, University officials started looking around for a replacement. Then several people told the Athletic Director about an outstanding candidate in his own backyard. It turned out that a young man who had coached baseball both at Ohio Wesleyan University and Allegheny College and then been a catcher for several major league baseball clubs (before his throwing arm went dead) was a student in the Law School. After receiving glowing reports about the young man (let's call him by his first two initials, W.B.), the Athletic ...