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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Law

China And The Human Right To Health: Selective Adaptation And Treaty Compliance, Pitman B. Potter Jan 2006

China And The Human Right To Health: Selective Adaptation And Treaty Compliance, Pitman B. Potter

Faculty Publications

The international community has devoted considerable energy to dialogue and exchanges with China on issues of treaty compliance in areas of trade and human rights, and while many improvements are evident in China’s legal regimes for trade and human rights, problems remain. Further, academic and policy discourses on China’s trade and human rights policy and practice are all too often conflicted by normative differences and illusions about them. The paradigm of “selective adaptation” offers a potential solution by examining compliance with international trade and human rights treaties by reference to the interplay between normative systems associated with international ...


Corporate Social Accountability Standards In The Global Supply Chain: Resistance, Reconsideration And Resolution In China, Li-Wen Lin Jan 2006

Corporate Social Accountability Standards In The Global Supply Chain: Resistance, Reconsideration And Resolution In China, Li-Wen Lin

Faculty Publications

This Article provides a view on corporate social accountability standards from a Chinese perspective, a slightly different angle from that of legal scholars in the United States. The legal literature in the United States typically only focuses on the importance and effectiveness of corporate social accountability standards to regulate the conduct of multinational companies in the era of globalization. However, the views of the outsourced companies in the developing countries on which the multinational companies impose the standards have seldom received attention. This Article tries to fill this void by examining the situation in China. As shown in this Article ...


Educating The Total Jurist?, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2006

Educating The Total Jurist?, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This paper discusses a discontinuity between the ways in which legal education has historically sought to reconstruct the soul of lawyers-in-training and the contemporary conceit that legal education can be value-free. It identifies a gap between early 21st century narrowly technocratic approaches to legal professionalism - epitomized by Enron professionalism and earlier conceptions of lawyering. A desire to instill a moral sensibility in apprentice lawyers weighed heavily in an earlier generation's thinking about legal education everywhere in the common law world, giving rise to the programmes, schemes, and imaginings that provided templates for contemporary university legal training. With surprising consistency ...


Developing Case Law: The Future Of Consultation And Accommodation, Gordon Christie Jan 2006

Developing Case Law: The Future Of Consultation And Accommodation, Gordon Christie

Faculty Publications

The aim in this paper is twofold. First, the historical development of the case law around the duty to consult will be laid out (e.g. Delgamuukw v. British Columbia and subsequent cases) and an attempt will be made to make sense of this body of jurisprudence (on both doctrinal and critical levels). Second, an attempt will be made to read out of the current doctrine how future events may unfold 'on the ground' in the legal and political arena in British Columbia and elsewhere in Canada.


Death Squads Or 'Directions Over Lunch': A Comparative Review Of The Independence Of The Bar, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2006

Death Squads Or 'Directions Over Lunch': A Comparative Review Of The Independence Of The Bar, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

Periodic crises around the conduct of lawyers provoke moves in the direction of constituting the organized legal profession as a regulated industry, much like any other. Such proposals, whether for regulation through Legal Services Commissions or other structures, abruptly confront the historically embedded constitutional notion that liberty itself rests on the independence of the bar. This paper engages in a comparative review of the notion of an independent legal profession. Its particular focus is on widely agreed international standards and on the experience of Commonwealth countries and especially Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom. The paper draws on literatures from ...


Domesticating The Exotic Species: International Biodiversity Law In Canada, Natasha Affolder Jan 2006

Domesticating The Exotic Species: International Biodiversity Law In Canada, Natasha Affolder

Faculty Publications

While a significant body of international and regional agreements now addresses habitat preservation, wildlife protection, and biological diversity, these advances on the international level often fail to be effectively translated into domestic law. In this article, the author argues that international biodiversity law is being treated in Canada as "exotic". It is peppered into parties' submissions without a principled explanation of its role in Canadian law, receives little consideration from the courts, and must ultimately rely on non-legal means of enforcement. The author examines the jurisprudence dealing with four major biodiversity treaties. She notes that the judicial treatment of these ...


Cachet Not Cash: Another Sort Of World Bank Group Borrowing, Natasha Affolder Jan 2006

Cachet Not Cash: Another Sort Of World Bank Group Borrowing, Natasha Affolder

Faculty Publications

This article explores the extent to which the World Bank's Environmental and Social Guidelines now serve as standards of acceptable global environmental and social behavior for transnational corporations. Although the World Bank Standards were not created for the purpose of providing global rules for business on social and environmental issues, they are frequently cited as de facto global standards. This article reveals the unlikely rise in prominence of these standards and the widespread adoption of these rules by corporations, public and private financial institutions, governments, and export credit agencies. This example of private borrowing of public standards is intriguing ...


Lawyers' Professionalism, Colonialism, State Formation And National Life In Nigeria, 1900-1960: 'The Fighting Brigade Of The People', Chidi Oguamanam, W. Wesley Pue Jan 2006

Lawyers' Professionalism, Colonialism, State Formation And National Life In Nigeria, 1900-1960: 'The Fighting Brigade Of The People', Chidi Oguamanam, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This essay explores the role of the organized legal profession in relation to British Imperialism, state formation, and independence in Nigeria. Drawing on recent works in the fields of post-colonial legal studies and cultural histories of legal professions, the paper develops an understanding of lawyering and lawyers' associations as deeply implicated in the myriad cultural projects through which law simultaneously 'civilizes' provincials and mediates between centre and locale. The paper reviews new developments in theories of legal professionalism and surveys secondary literatures of lawyers in colonial processes. It assesses the historical processes linking imperialism, law, and lawyers from the establishment ...


‘Blissed Out: Section 15 At Twenty’, Margot Young Jan 2006

‘Blissed Out: Section 15 At Twenty’, Margot Young

Faculty Publications

This paper was written for the 20th anniversary of the coming into force of section 15(1) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Unfortunately the same themes that defeated Stella Bliss in 1979, when she launched her Canadian Bill of Rights challenge to the Canadian Unemployment Insurance Act continue. While equality law has moved on from the specific facts of Bliss v. Canada (Attorney General), [1979] 1 S.C.R. 183, and from some of the discrete judicial conclusions in that case, it is still true that the series of critical ways of understanding the relationship between equality ...


Indefeasible Title In British Columbia: A Comment On The November 2005 Amendments To The Land Title Act, Douglas C. Harris Jan 2006

Indefeasible Title In British Columbia: A Comment On The November 2005 Amendments To The Land Title Act, Douglas C. Harris

Faculty Publications

In November 2005, as part of an omnibus statute amending 11 different acts, the British Columbia government made several significant changes to BC's Land Title Act. The government announced that the changes to the title registration system would 'ensure immediate legal certainty of land title for a person acting in good faith, who unknowingly acquired a fee simple interest in the property through a forged transfer, provided the individual did not participate in the fraud'. In an effort to assuage fears of those who had acquired interests in a system that, if it needed to be fixed, had been ...


Respecting And Protecting The Sacred, Darlene Johnston Jan 2006

Respecting And Protecting The Sacred, Darlene Johnston

Faculty Publications

In Canada, many citizens are justifiably proud of our country’s commitment to multiculturalism and respect for diversity. Cultural variations in language, art, law, and religion are not only tolerated but also celebrated. There is a growing appreciation that as human beings we share common, fundamental categories of experience, but that those experiences are mediated by and need to be understood in terms of our particular cultural contexts. Just as different cultures have different approaches to land and property, so too do traditions of sacredness vary. But respect for such variations, particularly as between Aboriginal peoples and newcomers to Canada ...


Connecting People To Place: Great Lakes Aboriginal History In Cultural Context, Darlene Johnston Jan 2006

Connecting People To Place: Great Lakes Aboriginal History In Cultural Context, Darlene Johnston

Faculty Publications

The author was asked to review the historical connection of Aboriginal people to the land that lies between Lake Huron and Lake Erie. She is a descendant of Great Lakes Aboriginal ancestors. Aboriginal history and self-understanding is conveyed across generations by stories and teachings grounded in particular landscapes. As a legally-trained historian, the author is familiar with the methods and protocols used in the document-based tradition. Her research method combines oral tradition and archival materials in order construct historical narratives in their cultural context. The task of connecting particular people to a specific place in a given time period is ...


The Supreme Court Of Canada And The General Anti-Avoidance Rule: Canada Trustco And Mathew, David G. Duff Jan 2006

The Supreme Court Of Canada And The General Anti-Avoidance Rule: Canada Trustco And Mathew, David G. Duff

Faculty Publications

On October 19, 2005, the Supreme Court of Canada released the first decisions in which it considered the general anti-avoidance rule (GAAR) in Sec. 245 of the federal Income Tax Act (ITA). Effective for transactions entered into on or after September 13, 1988, this rule was enacted as a deliberate response to the Supreme Court of Canada decision in Stubart Investments Ltd. v. The Queen and was intended to reduce what the Court had described as "the action and reaction endlessly produced by complex, specific tax measures aimed at sophisticated business practices, and the inevitable, professionally guided and equally specialized ...


New British Columbia Legislation: The Court Jurisdiction And Proceedings Transfer Act; The Enforcement Of Canadian Judgments And Decrees Act, Elizabeth Edinger Jan 2006

New British Columbia Legislation: The Court Jurisdiction And Proceedings Transfer Act; The Enforcement Of Canadian Judgments And Decrees Act, Elizabeth Edinger

Faculty Publications

Enacted in 2003, The Court Jurisdiction and Proceedings Transfer Act' and The Enforcement of Canadian Judgments and Decrees Act were finally proclaimed in force as of 4 May 2006. Both are modeled closely on statutes drafted by the Uniform Law Conference of Canada (ULCC); the commentary that accompanies the uniform statutes will undoubtedly prove very useful in interpreting and applying the British Columbia statutes. Some other provinces have also enacted one or both of these statutes and the case law generated in those jurisdictions will also be of assistance. The ULCC intended the statutes to be complementary. The generous recognition ...


The Legal Architecture Of Intergovernmental Transfers: A Comparative Examination, Sujit Choudhry, Benjamin Perrin Jan 2006

The Legal Architecture Of Intergovernmental Transfers: A Comparative Examination, Sujit Choudhry, Benjamin Perrin

Faculty Publications

An enormous body of literature exists on intergovernmental transfers between central governments and federal subunits. This work focuses almost exclusively on the economic justifications for such transfers, their design, and the challenges they pose to democratic accountability, transparency, and the autonomy of federal subunits. The legal dimension of intergovernmental transfers has received comparatively little scholarly attention. Systems of intergovernmental transfers are constituted and governed by domestic constitutional law, intergovernmental agreements, and legislation. One cannot fully appreciate how these systems operate without studying the legal instruments through which intergovernmental transfers are provided as well as their interpretation and enforcement by the ...