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Full-Text Articles in Law

Waging The War Against Unpaid Labor: A Call To Revoke Fact Sheet #71 In Light Of Recent Unpaid Internship Litigation, Rachel P. Willer May 2016

Waging The War Against Unpaid Labor: A Call To Revoke Fact Sheet #71 In Light Of Recent Unpaid Internship Litigation, Rachel P. Willer

Law Student Publications

Part I of this comment provides an overview of prevailing agency and judicial interpretations of unpaid internships. Part II describes recent internship litigation and the trend towards courts abandoning the Wage and Hour Division's six-factor test in favor of a more expansive primary beneficiary test. Part III suggests that Fact Sheet #71 is an outdated model that is inapplicable to contemporary internships. The Wage and Hour Division's six-factor test lacks the "force of law" and should not warrant undue judicial deference. Alternatively, the primary beneficiary test, articulated in the Second Circuit's holding in Glatt v. Fox Searchlight ...


Waging The War Against Unpaid Labor: A Call To Revoke Fact Sheet #71 In Light Of Recent Unpaid Internship Litigation, Rachel P. Willer May 2016

Waging The War Against Unpaid Labor: A Call To Revoke Fact Sheet #71 In Light Of Recent Unpaid Internship Litigation, Rachel P. Willer

University of Richmond Law Review

Part I of this comment provides an overview of prevailing agency and judicial interpretations of unpaid internships. Part II describes recent internship litigation and the trend towards courts abandoning the Wage and Hour Division's six-factor test in favor of a more expansive primary beneficiary test. Part III suggests that Fact Sheet #71 is an outdated model that is inapplicable to contemporary internships. The Wage and Hour Division's six-factor test lacks the "force of law" and should not warrant un- due judicial deference. Alternatively, the primary beneficiary test, articulated in the Second Circuit's holding in Glatt v. Fox ...


Joint Employers: The Nevada Casino Operator's Role In Regulating Labor Conditions Of Venue Employees, Mary Tran Apr 2016

Joint Employers: The Nevada Casino Operator's Role In Regulating Labor Conditions Of Venue Employees, Mary Tran

UNLV Gaming Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Will Work For Free: The Legality Of Unpaid Internships, Nicole M. Klinger Jan 2016

Will Work For Free: The Legality Of Unpaid Internships, Nicole M. Klinger

Brooklyn Journal of Corporate, Financial & Commercial Law

This Note addresses the current ambiguity in the law regarding if unpaid interns are employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Note explores relevant case law throughout the circuit courts, but primarily focuses on the Second Circuit’s recent decision in Glatt v. Fox Searchlight Pictures. It argues that the primary benefits test created by the Second Circuit in Glatt does not adequately protect unpaid interns nor does it inform employers of the standards they need to meet in order to adopt legal unpaid internship programs. Instead, courts should adopt a clearer, more rigid test that finds an intern ...


"An Equally Divided Court": Workplace Law In The U.S. Supreme Court 2015-2016, Ruben J. Garcia Jan 2016

"An Equally Divided Court": Workplace Law In The U.S. Supreme Court 2015-2016, Ruben J. Garcia

Scholarly Works

The 2015-2016 Term of the United States Supreme Court was scarcely halfway over when Justice Antonin Scalia passed away on February 12, 2016. This event and the political gridlock over his successor defined the Term in some ways more than the actual decisions of the Court, particularly when the resulting vacancy led an “equally divided” Supreme Court to affirm the courts below in a one sentence judgment. The most watched of these cases in workplace law was Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, where the Supreme Court’s 4-4 tie avoided the overruling of decades of precedent upholding the constitutionality of ...


Wage Theft As Public Larceny, Elizabeth J. Kennedy Jan 2016

Wage Theft As Public Larceny, Elizabeth J. Kennedy

Brooklyn Law Review

Home care for the elderly and disabled is a rapidly expanding industry in which structural and regulatory factors contribute to worker vulnerability and exploitation. Systemic exclusion from core federal employment and labor laws, as well as many state and local regulations, results in minimal consequences for employers who violate standards. Despite recent movement at the federal level to create a “new mindset” of rights and regulations, home care workers must be equipped with creative ways to enforce these new rights and to challenge existing gaps in enforcement. With the understanding that two-thirds of the home care industry is financed by ...


Disability Rights And Labor: Is This Conflict Really Necessary?, Samuel R. Bagenstos Jan 2016

Disability Rights And Labor: Is This Conflict Really Necessary?, Samuel R. Bagenstos

Indiana Law Journal

In this Essay, I hope to do two things: First, I try to put the current labor-disability controversy into that broader context. Second, and perhaps more important, I take a position on how disability rights advocates should approach both the current contro-versy and labor-disability tensions more broadly. As to the narrow dispute over wage-and-hour protections for personal-assistance workers, I argue both that those workers have a compelling normative claim to full FLSA protection—a claim that disability rights advocates should recognize—and that supporting the claim of those workers is pragmatically in the best interests of the disability rights movement ...