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Full-Text Articles in Law

What Dna Can And Cannot Say: Perspectives Of Immigrant Families About The Use Of Genetic Testing In Immigration, Llilida P. Barata, Helene Starks, Patricia Kuszler, Wylie Burke Jan 2015

What Dna Can And Cannot Say: Perspectives Of Immigrant Families About The Use Of Genetic Testing In Immigration, Llilida P. Barata, Helene Starks, Patricia Kuszler, Wylie Burke

Articles

Genetic technologies are being implemented in areas that extend beyond the field of medicine to address social and legal problems. An emerging example is the implementation of genetic testing in the family petitioning process in immigration policy. This use of genetic testing offers the potential benefits of reducing immigration fraud and making the process more efficient and accessible for immigrants, especially those without documentation. However, little is known about the positive or negative impacts of such testing on immigrant families and their communities.

This study collected empirical data through family interviews to understand the experiences and attitudes of individuals who ...


Sex, Privacy And Public Health In A Casual Encounters Culture, Mary D. Fan Dec 2011

Sex, Privacy And Public Health In A Casual Encounters Culture, Mary D. Fan

Articles

The regulation of sex and disease is a cultural and political flashpoint and recurring challenge that law's antiquated arsenal has been hard- pressed to effectively address. Compelling data demonstrate the need for attention—for example, one in four women aged fourteen to nineteen is infected with at least one sexually transmitted disease ("STD"); managing STDs costs an estimated $15.9 billion annually; and syphilis, once near eradication, is on the rise again, as are the rates of HIV diagnosis among people aged fifteen to twenty-four. Public health officials on the front lines have called for paradigm changes to tackle ...


Global Health And Human Rights Imperative, Patricia C. Kuszler Jan 2007

Global Health And Human Rights Imperative, Patricia C. Kuszler

Articles

Open any magazine, click on a television news channel, or surf the net and you are likely to find global health highlighted as one of the foremost challenges of new millennium. First, this article will consider the meaning and measures of global health and detail the path to improved health and development prescribed by the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Second, it will trace the development of international human rights law as it relates to health. Third, it demonstrate how human rights and health, long traversing parallel routes, are in fact converging in the 21st Century quest for global health ...


Syringes In The Sea: Why Federal Regulation Of Medical Waste Is Long Overdue, Chryssa V. Deliganis, Steve P. Calandrillo Jan 2006

Syringes In The Sea: Why Federal Regulation Of Medical Waste Is Long Overdue, Chryssa V. Deliganis, Steve P. Calandrillo

Articles

Medical waste is produced everywhere that people live and by almost everyone at some point in their lives. Its treatment and disposal implicates the environment, public health, the economy, human dignity, and aesthetics. With the many issues involved, the need for federal regulation of medical waste today is manifest.

This Article examines the problem of medical waste disposal and evaluates the current state-based approach to regulation. Although many states have implemented stringent medical waste programs with some success, the absence of direct federal regulation in this area is problematic. The need for national leadership is clear, especially with respect to ...


Liability, Regulation And Policy In Surgical Innovation: The Cutting Edge Of Research And Therapy, Anna C. Mastroianni Jan 2006

Liability, Regulation And Policy In Surgical Innovation: The Cutting Edge Of Research And Therapy, Anna C. Mastroianni

Articles

This article examines the implications of the foregoing competing claims from a U.S. legal perspective, focusing particularly on how the legal system addresses patient safety concerns and autonomous decision-making of surgeons in the context of surgical innovation. The lack of oversight and the risks borne by patients during surgeons' development and subsequent refinement of a novel procedure must be balanced with the need to encourage medical progress through the development of improved techniques designed to benefit the health of current and future patients. This article argues that current reliance on the medical malpractice system and the federal regulatory system ...


Biotechnology Entrepreneurship And Ethics: Principles, Paradigms, And Products, Patricia C. Kuszler Jan 2006

Biotechnology Entrepreneurship And Ethics: Principles, Paradigms, And Products, Patricia C. Kuszler

Articles

Biotechnology, whether in the context of new drugs derived from DNA and genetic technology, genetically modified food, or biologics making use of living cells, raises ethical concerns at a variety of different levels. At the research level, there is concern that the very nature of research is being subverted, rather than enhanced, by entrepreneurship. This area of ethical concern has intensified in the United States as a result of the conflicts of interests resulting from the growing alliance between University academia and private industry in the research enterprise. As we travel down the research path into development of a drug ...


Intellectual Property Rights And Stem Cell Research: Who Owns The Medical Breakthroughs?, Sean M. O'Connor Jan 2005

Intellectual Property Rights And Stem Cell Research: Who Owns The Medical Breakthroughs?, Sean M. O'Connor

Articles

This article will not address the science and ethics of stem cell research—at least as far as those topics are normally addressed in the existing literature. Instead, this article argues that an even more contentious battle is looming on the horizon, with dire practical consequences: Namely, who will own the revolutionary medical breakthroughs that are supposed to emerge from this research? Along the way, this article will assume that stem cell research will progress in some fashion and that at least some of the purported benefits will materialize.

But the central premise is that the pitch of the ownership ...


Cash For Kidneys? Utilizing Incentives To End America's Organ Shortage, Steve P. Calandrillo Jan 2004

Cash For Kidneys? Utilizing Incentives To End America's Organ Shortage, Steve P. Calandrillo

Articles

This article addresses the growing organ shortage in America, analyzes current donation and procurement law, and explores both monetary and nonmonetary incentives aimed at eliminating the worsening crisis.

Part I details the law governing human organ donation. Under both the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (“UAGA”) and the National Organ Transplant Act (“NOTA”), no donor of a human organ may receive “valuable consideration” for providing it. Congress’ intention was simply that the organ recipient be given the “gift” of life—not one which she had to purchase on the market. In reality, the consequences of the Act bear little resemblance to ...


Vanishing Vaccinations: Why Are So Many Americans Opting Out Of Vaccinating Their Children?, Steve P. Calandrillo Jan 2004

Vanishing Vaccinations: Why Are So Many Americans Opting Out Of Vaccinating Their Children?, Steve P. Calandrillo

Articles

Part I of this Article details the historical development and medical achievements made possible by vaccines. From Edward Jenner to Jonas Salk to Albert Sabin, immense strides have been made in eradicating or substantially eliminating some of the worst diseases in human history. Smallpox, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, influenza, hepatitis A and B, and even the chicken pox are all now largely preventable.

Literally hundreds of millions of deaths have been avoided and many more lives markedly improved, to say nothing of the financial ramifications for the American healthcare system. All fifty states have therefore enacted compulsory ...


Curing Conflicts Of Interest In Clinical Research: Impossible Dreams And Harsh Realities, Patricia C. Kuszler Jan 2001

Curing Conflicts Of Interest In Clinical Research: Impossible Dreams And Harsh Realities, Patricia C. Kuszler

Articles

This article will explore conflicts of interest in the context of clinical research, focusing on the incentives and practices that foster such conflicts. Part I will briefly define and categorize the revenue streams at play in clinical research—both contemporaneous with the clinical trial, and the downstream, long-term gains available to the researcher and research university. Part II will discuss how these entangled revenue streams result in financial and non-financial conflicts of interest that affect the nature and balance of the research enterprise and potentially endanger patients and human subjects. Part III will summarize current conflicts of interest regulations and ...


Financing Clinical Research And Experimental Therapies: Payment Due, But From Whom?, Patricia C. Kuszler Jan 2000

Financing Clinical Research And Experimental Therapies: Payment Due, But From Whom?, Patricia C. Kuszler

Articles

This article will explore the realm of clinical research and the question of who should finance such research. The first part will define the various types and levels of clinical research in terms of the regulatory controls and oversight applied to such research. Then the article will summarize how the costs of clinical research and experimental therapies have been covered in the past. Finally, the article will evaluate the risks and benefits derived by the various stakeholders and propose a financing rationale for therapies that places the burden of cost squarely on the stakeholders most likely to benefit.


Telemedicine And Integrated Health Care Delivery: Compounding Malpractice Liability, Patricia C. Kuszler Jan 1999

Telemedicine And Integrated Health Care Delivery: Compounding Malpractice Liability, Patricia C. Kuszler

Articles

This Article considers how theories of medical negligence might be applied in the context of telemedicine and integrated delivery health plans. Part Two summarizes the history of telemedicine, its increasing breadth of application and opportunity and promise for the future. Part Three reviews traditional negligence principles and precedents and demonstrates how they might be applied when a telemedicine interaction results in negligence and harm to the patient. Part Four discusses evolving theories of shared liability applicable to health plans and managed care entities. Finally, Part Five demonstrates how shared liability theories will be applied to situations involving telemedicine technologies.


Balancing The Barriers: Exploiting And Creating Incentives To Promote Development Of New Tuberculosis Treatments, Patricia C. Kuszler Jan 1996

Balancing The Barriers: Exploiting And Creating Incentives To Promote Development Of New Tuberculosis Treatments, Patricia C. Kuszler

Articles

This Article considers the many barriers that health-care providers and public health authorities face in stemming the modem TB epidemic. Part II reviews historical public health measures, their results, and their adaptability to resurgent and MDR-TB. Part III considers the fundamental barriers to a successful global effort using these public health strategies, concluding that these barriers are insurmountable given the current arsenal of anti-tuberculosis therapies. Part IV examines the reasons why research and development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs and vaccines have stagnated over the last quarter century. Finally, part V explores incentives that might revive research and development of such ...