Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Law Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 24 of 24

Full-Text Articles in Law

Powerful Speakers And Their Listeners, Helen Norton Jan 2019

Powerful Speakers And Their Listeners, Helen Norton

Articles

In certain settings, law sometimes puts listeners first when their First Amendment interests collide with speakers’. And collide they often do. Sometimes speakers prefer to tell lies when their listeners thirst for the truth. Sometimes listeners hope that speakers will reveal their secrets, while those speakers resist disclosure. And at still other times, speakers seek to address certain listeners when those listeners long to be left alone. When speakers’ and listeners’ First Amendment interests collide, whose interests should prevail? Law sometimes – but not always – puts listeners’ interests first in settings outside of public discourse where those listeners have less information ...


Pregnancy And The First Amendment, Helen Norton Jan 2019

Pregnancy And The First Amendment, Helen Norton

Articles

Suppose that you are pregnant and seated in the waiting room of a Planned Parenthood clinic, or maybe in a facility that advertises “Pregnant? We Can Help You.” This Essay discusses the First Amendment rules that apply to the government’s control of what you are about to hear.

If the government funds your clinic’s program, the U.S. Supreme Court has held that it does not violate the First Amendment’s Free Speech Clause when it forbids your health-care provider from offering you information about available abortion services. Nor does the government violate the Free Speech Clause, the ...


Data Collection, Ehrs, And Poverty Determinations, Craig Konnoth Jan 2018

Data Collection, Ehrs, And Poverty Determinations, Craig Konnoth

Articles

Collecting and deploying poverty-related data is an important starting point for leveraging data regarding social determinants of health in precision medicine. However, we must rethink how we collect and deploy such data. Current modes of collection yield imprecise data that is unsuited for research. Better data can be collected by cross-referencing other sources such as employers and public benefit programs, and by incentivizing and encouraging patients and providers to provide more accurate information. Data thus collected can be used to provide appropriate individual-level clinical and non-clinical care, and to systematically determine what share of social resources healthcare should consume.


Researching Colorado Health Law, Kerri Rowe Jan 2018

Researching Colorado Health Law, Kerri Rowe

Articles

No abstract provided.


Health Information Equity, Craig Konnoth Jan 2017

Health Information Equity, Craig Konnoth

Articles

In the last few years, numerous Americans’ health information has been collected and used for follow-on, secondary research. This research studies correlations between medical conditions, genetic or behavioral profiles, and treatments, to customize medical care to specific individuals. Recent federal legislation and regulations make it easier to collect and use the data of the low-income, unwell, and elderly for this purpose. This would impose disproportionate security and autonomy burdens on these individuals. Those who are well-off and pay out of pocket could effectively exempt their data from the publicly available information pot. This presents a problem which modern research ethics ...


Entrepreneurial Administration, Philip J. Weiser Jan 2017

Entrepreneurial Administration, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

A core failing of today’s administrative state and modern administrative law scholarship is the lack of imagination as to how agencies should operate. On the conventional telling, public agencies follow specific grants of regulatory authority, use the traditional tools of notice-and-comment rulemaking and adjudication, and are checked by judicial review. In reality, however, effective administration depends on entrepreneurial leadership that spearheads policy experimentation and trial-and-error problem-solving, including the development of regulatory programs that use non-traditional tools.

Entrepreneurial administration takes place both at public agencies and private entities, each of which can address regulatory challenges and earn regulatory authority as ...


An Expressive Theory Of Privacy Intrusions, Craig Konnoth Jan 2017

An Expressive Theory Of Privacy Intrusions, Craig Konnoth

Articles

The harms of privacy intrusions are numerous. They include discrimination, reputational harm, and chilling effects on speech, thought, and behavior. However, scholarship has yet to fully recognize a kind of privacy harm that this article terms "expressive."

Depending on where the search is taking place and who the actors involved are--a teacher in a school, the police on the street, a food inspector in a restaurant--victims and observers might infer different messages from the search. The search marks the importance of certain societal values such as law enforcement or food safety. It can also send messages about certain groups by ...


Classification Standards For Health Information: Ethical And Practical Approaches, Craig Konnoth Jan 2016

Classification Standards For Health Information: Ethical And Practical Approaches, Craig Konnoth

Articles

Secondary health information research requires vast quantities of data in order to make clinical and health delivery breakthroughs. Restrictive policies that limit the use of such information threaten to stymie this research. While the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for the new Common Rule permits patients to provide broad consent for the use of their information for research, that policy offers insufficient flexibility. This Article suggests a flexible consenting system that allows patients to consent to a range of privacy risks. The details of the system will be fleshed out in future work.


Genetic Essentialism In Family Law, Jennifer S. Hendricks Jan 2016

Genetic Essentialism In Family Law, Jennifer S. Hendricks

Articles

No abstract provided.


Environmental Law, Big Data, And The Torrent Of Singularities, William Boyd Jan 2016

Environmental Law, Big Data, And The Torrent Of Singularities, William Boyd

Articles

How will big data impact environmental law in the near future? This Essay imagines one possible future for environmental law in 2030 that focuses on the implications of big data for the protection of public health from risks associated with pollution and industrial chemicals. It assumes the perspective of an historian looking back from the end of the twenty-first century at the evolution of environmental law during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The premise of the Essay is that big data will drive a major shift in the underlying knowledge practices of environmental law (along with other areas ...


A New Governance Recipe For Food Safety Regulation, Alexia Brunet Marks Jan 2016

A New Governance Recipe For Food Safety Regulation, Alexia Brunet Marks

Articles

Although food safety is a significant and increasing global health concern, international economic law does not adequately address today’s global food safety needs. While most countries rely on a collection of formalized legal rules to protect food safety, these rules too often fall short. As fiscal constraints impede raising the number of border inspections, formal international commitments (treaties) frequently limit governmental efforts to raise food safety standards. Private companies, meanwhile, can readily adopt higher standards to meet consumer demands and supply chain needs, thus demonstrating more nimbleness and flexibility in adopting the highest food safety standards available. Can countries ...


Toward A Structural Theory Of Implicit Racial And Ethnic Bias In Health Care, Dayna Bowen Matthew Jan 2015

Toward A Structural Theory Of Implicit Racial And Ethnic Bias In Health Care, Dayna Bowen Matthew

Articles

No abstract provided.


Health Care, Title Vi, And Racism's New Normal, Dayna Bowen Matthew Jan 2014

Health Care, Title Vi, And Racism's New Normal, Dayna Bowen Matthew

Articles

No abstract provided.


Undue Burdens In Texas, Jennifer S. Hendricks Jan 2013

Undue Burdens In Texas, Jennifer S. Hendricks

Articles

No abstract provided.


Reining In The Rogue Squadron: Making Sense Of The "Original Source" Exception For Qui Tam Relators, Dayna Bowen Matthew Jan 2012

Reining In The Rogue Squadron: Making Sense Of The "Original Source" Exception For Qui Tam Relators, Dayna Bowen Matthew

Articles

The qui tam provision of the Civil False Claims Act effectively serves to expand the government’s capacity to combat fraud, but also invites abusive prosecution against blameless public contractors. Although the public disclosure jurisdictional bar is designed to permit worthy claimants to proceed as whistle blowers while precluding parasitic opportunists from unfairly imposing litigation costs and reaping undeserved awards, the inconsistent judicial interpretation of the original source exception threatens predictable and just law enforcement. Christopher Alexion’s note categorizes the approaches courts have taken as ranging from permissive, to “middle ground” to restrictive based on the timing of the ...


Genealogies Of Risk: Searching For Safety, 1930s-1970s, William Boyd Jan 2012

Genealogies Of Risk: Searching For Safety, 1930s-1970s, William Boyd

Articles

Health, safety, and environmental regulation in the United States are saturated with risk thinking. It was not always so, and it may not be so in the future. But today, the formal, quantitative approach to risk provides much of the basis for regulation in these fields, a development that seems quite natural, even necessary. This particular approach, while it drew on conceptual and technical developments that had been underway for decades, achieved prominence during a relatively short timeframe; roughly, between the mid-1970s and the early 1980s--a time of hard looks and regulatory reform. Prior to this time, formal conceptions of ...


Implementing American Health Care Reform: The Fiduciary Imperative, Dayna Bowen Matthew Jan 2011

Implementing American Health Care Reform: The Fiduciary Imperative, Dayna Bowen Matthew

Articles

The success of health reform under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 will depend upon the sustainability of a brand new and infrastructure of entities, relationships, and procedures. So far, neither jurists, legislators, policy-makers, providers, payers, nor patients have identified an organizing paradigm to implement or regulate this vast new infrastructure. Legal scholars have been curiously absent from this policy discussion, offering little if any insight into the role law plays beyond the familiar political debates about health reform. This article draws a legal chair to the table and takes a refined look at the legal basis ...


Reviving Employee Rights - Recent And Upcoming Employment Discrimination Legislation: Proceedings Of The 2010 Annual Meeting Of The Association Of American Law Schools Section On Employment Discrimination Law, Scott A. Moss, Sandra Sperino, Robin R. Runge, Charles A. Sullivan Jan 2010

Reviving Employee Rights - Recent And Upcoming Employment Discrimination Legislation: Proceedings Of The 2010 Annual Meeting Of The Association Of American Law Schools Section On Employment Discrimination Law, Scott A. Moss, Sandra Sperino, Robin R. Runge, Charles A. Sullivan

Articles

No abstract provided.


Body And Soul: Equality, Pregnancy, And The Unitary Right To Abortion, Jennifer S. Hendricks Jan 2010

Body And Soul: Equality, Pregnancy, And The Unitary Right To Abortion, Jennifer S. Hendricks

Articles

This Article explores equality-based arguments for abortion rights, revealing both their necessity and their pitfalls. It first uses the narrowness of the "health exception" to abortion regulations to demonstrate why equality arguments are needed--namely because our legal tradition's conception of liberty is based on male experience, no theory of basic human rights grounded in women's reproductive experiences has developed. Next, however, the Article shows that equality arguments, although necessary, can undermine women's reproductive freedom by requiring that pregnancy and abortion be analogized to male experiences. As a result, equality arguments focus on either the bodily or the ...


Abbott, Aids, And The Ada: Why A Per Se Disability Rule For Hiv/Aids Is Both Just And A Must, Scott Thompson Jan 2008

Abbott, Aids, And The Ada: Why A Per Se Disability Rule For Hiv/Aids Is Both Just And A Must, Scott Thompson

Articles

HIV/AIDS should be classified as a per se disability under the Americans with Disablities Act. Such a ruling is justified by the plain language of the act itself, legislative history, administrative regulations, and court precedent. Absent such a ruling, individuals with HIV must demonstrate that they have (1) an mental or physical impairment, (2) that substantially limits (3) a major life activity. While most courts to address the applicability of the ADA to individuals with HIV/AIDS have found that such individuals are disabled because HIV impairs the major life activity of reproduction, such an interpretation leaves open the ...


Restructuring The Debate Over Fetal Homicide Laws, Carolyn B. Ramsey Jan 2006

Restructuring The Debate Over Fetal Homicide Laws, Carolyn B. Ramsey

Articles

The worst problems with the fetal homicide laws that have proliferated around the nation are quite different than the existing scholarship suggests. Critics often argue that the statutes, which criminalize the killing of a fetus by a third party other than an abortion provider, undermine a woman's right to terminate her pregnancy. This concern is overstated. Although supported by anti-abortionists, many of the fetal homicide laws embody the perspective of the so-called "abortion grays," who eschew the absolutism of the doctrinaire pro-choice and anti-abortion camps. This Article explores how a contextual view of life-taking allows us to reconcile legal ...


Herd Behavior In Designer Genes, Peter H. Huang Jan 1999

Herd Behavior In Designer Genes, Peter H. Huang

Articles

The ability of individuals to choose their children's genes has increased over time and may ultimately culminate in a world involving free market reprogenetic technologies. Reprogenetic technologies combine advances in reproductive biology and genetics to provide humans increased control over their children's genes. This Article offers economic perspectives that are helpful in understanding the possibly unexpected ethical, legal, and social issues at stake in using reprogenetic technologies for trait enhancement selection. The Appendix analyzes two competitive games that might arise in such a biotechnological society. Specifically, the Article focuses on herd behavior, caused by either a popularity contest ...


A Comment On "Constitutional Rights As Public Goods", Robert F. Nagel Jan 1995

A Comment On "Constitutional Rights As Public Goods", Robert F. Nagel

Articles

Discussion of T. W. Merrill, Dolan v. City of Tigard: Constitutional Rights as Public Goods, 72 Denv. U. L. Rev. 859 (1995).


Death And Taxes: The Taxation Of Accelerated Death Benefits For The Terminally Ill, Wayne M. Gazur Jan 1991

Death And Taxes: The Taxation Of Accelerated Death Benefits For The Terminally Ill, Wayne M. Gazur

Articles

No abstract provided.