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Full-Text Articles in Law

Climate Changes Disputes At The World Trade Organization: National Energy Policies And International Trade Liability, Nilmini Silva-Send Jan 2013

Climate Changes Disputes At The World Trade Organization: National Energy Policies And International Trade Liability, Nilmini Silva-Send

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This Article draws attention to the different outcomes that may result when WTO law is applied to resolve climate related national energy policy disputes, signals this might send for national energy policies, and how a subtle effect of indirect state liability may arise. Several pending or unresolved complaints currently at the WTO are used to demonstrate these effects. The complaints include the greenhouse gas controversy, the wind energy subsidies complaint, and the feed-in tariffs complaint. The next section, Section II, presents the basic WTO obligations of the four countries involved in these complaints (Japan, Canada, USA, China), and ways that ...


V.4, 2013 Masthead Jan 2013

V.4, 2013 Masthead

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

No abstract provided.


Legal, Technical, And Economic Challenges In Integrating Renewable Power Generation Into The Electricity Grid, Timothy P. Duane, Kiran H. Griffith Jan 2013

Legal, Technical, And Economic Challenges In Integrating Renewable Power Generation Into The Electricity Grid, Timothy P. Duane, Kiran H. Griffith

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This Article addresses the legal, technical, and economic challenges of integrating high levels of renewable power generation into electrical grid system operation. Part II shows that the primary integration challenge is reducing the total costs of integration and allocating the costs of integration in a hybrid regulatory structure, which presents different institutional impediments than traditional cost-of-service ratemaking or rate-of-return regulation. We demonstrate that the primary impediment to improved integration is a failure to make the critical policy choice about how such costs will be allocated. Part III describes and analyzes the BPA-wind dispute in order to evaluate the adequacy of ...


Expedited Approval Of Energy Projects: Toward Assessing The Forms Of Procedural Relief, Michael B. Gerrard Jan 2013

Expedited Approval Of Energy Projects: Toward Assessing The Forms Of Procedural Relief, Michael B. Gerrard

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This research is heading toward two further sets of questions, which may or may not be reached in the current phase of the work.

First, if certain permits or reviews can be dispensed with for certain projects, and there are few negative collateral consequences, do we need these permits and reviews at all? Every proposed project is important to someone, and arguments can almost always be mounted that a given kind of project warrants special treatment. The present inquiry may help identify some requirements that are obsolete and should not apply to anyone, and it may also help identify others ...


Harmonizing Distributed Energy And The Endangered Species Act, J. B. Ruhl Jan 2013

Harmonizing Distributed Energy And The Endangered Species Act, J. B. Ruhl

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This Article explores ways of harmonizing distributed energy and the ESA, a goal consistent with the national policy for renewable energy conservation. Several legal practitioners and scholars have identified the ESA as a potentially significant constraint on the siting and operation of wind power facilities. The ESA has also been identified as a potential barrier to renewable energy in general, as solar power, biomass, and ocean tide and wave facilities could have their own sets of impacts triggering ESA regulation. But most of this attention has been devoted to utility-scale renewable energy, with distributed energy largely ignored or perhaps assumed ...


Who Regulates The Smart Grid? : Ferc's Authority Over Demand Response Compensation In Wholesale Electricity Markets, Joel B. Eisen Jan 2013

Who Regulates The Smart Grid? : Ferc's Authority Over Demand Response Compensation In Wholesale Electricity Markets, Joel B. Eisen

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This Article argues that Order 745 is both justified under the Federal Power Act (FPA) and important to ensure the transition to a clean energy future. A challenge to Order 745, Electric Power Supply Association v. FERC, is currently pending in the D.C. Circuit. This Article contends that Order 745 should be upheld against this challenge because it fits within FERC’s broad authority to regulate the wholesale power markets.


Waste Not, Want Not: Landfill Gas To Energy Projects, Climate Change, And The Clean Air Act, Katherine A. Trisolini Jan 2013

Waste Not, Want Not: Landfill Gas To Energy Projects, Climate Change, And The Clean Air Act, Katherine A. Trisolini

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This Article aims to address this gap, proposing how the Rule could be amended to reduce methane generally and enhance LGTE specifically.

The sections discuss legal mechanisms to reduce landfill methane emissions and promote LGTE where appropriate, focusing on the federal Clean Air Act’s potential role in regulating landfill gas emissions. Section II explains the adverse effects of methane emissions generally and the potential benefits of reducing landfill emissions specifically. Section III describes federal emissions standards under the Clean Air Act and incentive programs for expanded use of LGTE. The discussion highlights potential conflicts between divergent means of regulating ...


South Africa's Electricity Crisis: The Need To Reconcile Environmental Policy Decisions With International Treaties, Brittany D. Botterill Jan 2013

South Africa's Electricity Crisis: The Need To Reconcile Environmental Policy Decisions With International Treaties, Brittany D. Botterill

San Diego Journal of Climate & Energy Law

This Comment examines whether South Africa’s treaty obligations conflict with the requirement of the country’s government to provide electricity to a burgeoning home-owning population. Section II introduces Eskom, South Africa’s largest utility company, which produces most of the electricity used in South Africa and surrounding countries. Section III discusses South Africa’s role in the Southern Africa Power Pool and the additional obligations this membership places on the country. Section IV then examines the controversial loan that South Africa received from the World Bank to assist in building the Medupi coal-fired power plant. Section V illustrates South ...