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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Law

Resistance To Equality, Elizabeth M. Schneider Apr 1996

Resistance To Equality, Elizabeth M. Schneider

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Searches, Seizures, Confessions, And Some Thoughts On Criminal Procedure: Regulation Of Police Investigation -- Legal, Historical, Empirical, And Comparative Materials, Daniel B. Yeager Jan 1996

Searches, Seizures, Confessions, And Some Thoughts On Criminal Procedure: Regulation Of Police Investigation -- Legal, Historical, Empirical, And Comparative Materials, Daniel B. Yeager

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Introduction: The Promise Of The Violence Against Women Act Of 1994, Elizabeth M. Schneider Jan 1996

Introduction: The Promise Of The Violence Against Women Act Of 1994, Elizabeth M. Schneider

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Who Should Regulate The Ethics Of Federal Prosecutors?, Rory K. Little Jan 1996

Who Should Regulate The Ethics Of Federal Prosecutors?, Rory K. Little

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Intertwined Problems Of Immigration And Sentencing, Aaron J. Rappaport, Nora Demleitner, Daniel J. Freed Jan 1996

The Intertwined Problems Of Immigration And Sentencing, Aaron J. Rappaport, Nora Demleitner, Daniel J. Freed

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Myth Of Morality And Fault In Criminal Law Doctrine, John L. Diamond Jan 1996

The Myth Of Morality And Fault In Criminal Law Doctrine, John L. Diamond

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Mature Adjudication: Interpretive Choice In Recent Death Penalty Cases, Bernard Harcourt Jan 1996

Mature Adjudication: Interpretive Choice In Recent Death Penalty Cases, Bernard Harcourt

Faculty Scholarship

Capital punishment presents a "hard" case for adjudication. It provokes sharp conflict between competing constitutional interpretations and invariably raises questions of judicial bias. This is particularly true in the new Republic of South Africa, where the framers of the interim constitution deliberately were silent regarding the legality of the death penalty. The tension is of equivalent force in the United States, where recent expressions of core constitutional rights have raised potentially irreconcilable conflicts in the application of capital punishment.

Two recent death penalty decisions – the South African Constitutional Court opinions in State v. Makwanyane and the United States Supreme Court ...