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Criminal Procedure

1992

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Articles 31 - 60 of 88

Full-Text Articles in Law

Significant Cases Interpreting Proposition 8, J. Clark Kelso, Brigitte A. Bass Jan 1992

Significant Cases Interpreting Proposition 8, J. Clark Kelso, Brigitte A. Bass

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


The “Right” To A Disinterested Prosecutor Of Criminal Contempt: Unpacking Public And Private Interests, Joan Meier Jan 1992

The “Right” To A Disinterested Prosecutor Of Criminal Contempt: Unpacking Public And Private Interests, Joan Meier

Washington University Law Review

In this Article I argue that, contrary to Justice Blackmun's concurring opinion and the opinions of several state courts, courts should not expand Young to establish a new due process right for criminal contemnors that would bind state courts.


Arizona V. Fulminante: Where's The Harm In Harmless Error?, Kenneth R. Kenkel Jan 1992

Arizona V. Fulminante: Where's The Harm In Harmless Error?, Kenneth R. Kenkel

Kentucky Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Police Officers Accused Of Crime: Prosecutorial And Fifth Amendment Risks Posed By Police-Elicited "Use Immunized" Statements, Kate Bloch Jan 1992

Police Officers Accused Of Crime: Prosecutorial And Fifth Amendment Risks Posed By Police-Elicited "Use Immunized" Statements, Kate Bloch

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Sentencing Guidelines And Mandatory Minimums: Mixing Apples And Oranges, William W. Schwarzer Jan 1992

Sentencing Guidelines And Mandatory Minimums: Mixing Apples And Oranges, William W. Schwarzer

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


(Un)Luckey V. Miller: The Case For A Structural Injunction To Improve Indigent Defense Services, Rodger D. Citron Jan 1992

(Un)Luckey V. Miller: The Case For A Structural Injunction To Improve Indigent Defense Services, Rodger D. Citron

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


New Federal Sentencing Guidelines For Organizations Take Effect, Daniel R. Dertke Jan 1992

New Federal Sentencing Guidelines For Organizations Take Effect, Daniel R. Dertke

Washington University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Victim Impact Evidence, Arbitrariness, And The Death Penalty: The Supreme Court Flipflops In Payne V. Tennessee, Aida Alaka Jan 1992

Victim Impact Evidence, Arbitrariness, And The Death Penalty: The Supreme Court Flipflops In Payne V. Tennessee, Aida Alaka

Loyola University Chicago Law Journal

No abstract provided.


(Un)Luckey V. Miller: The Case For A Structural Injunction To Improve Indigent Defense Services, Rodger D. Citron Jan 1992

(Un)Luckey V. Miller: The Case For A Structural Injunction To Improve Indigent Defense Services, Rodger D. Citron

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Another Step Towards Ending Discrimination In The Jury Selection Process - Powers V. Ohio, L. Phillip Hornthal Iii Jan 1992

Another Step Towards Ending Discrimination In The Jury Selection Process - Powers V. Ohio, L. Phillip Hornthal Iii

Campbell Law Review

This Note has four objectives. First, this Note will review the constitutional history behind Powers, involving racially motivated discrimination in the jury selection process. Second, this Note will analyze and discuss the Powers decision. Third, this Note will attempt to ascertain the impact of the decision. Finally, this Note will suggest that while Powers marks progress in the right direction, there are other important questions that need to be resolved before the jury selection process will be totally free from discrimination.


Continuity And Change Redux: Market And State In American History, Richard Adelstein Jan 1992

Continuity And Change Redux: Market And State In American History, Richard Adelstein

Division II Faculty Publications

A review of Jonathan Hughes, The Government Habit Redux (1991).


The Revitalization Of The Common-Law Civil Writ Of Audita Querela As A Post-Conviction Remedy In Criminal Cases: The Immigration Context And Beyond, Ira Robbins Jan 1992

The Revitalization Of The Common-Law Civil Writ Of Audita Querela As A Post-Conviction Remedy In Criminal Cases: The Immigration Context And Beyond, Ira Robbins

Articles in Law Reviews & Other Academic Journals

Introduction: An alien lawfully enters the United States in 1972. He gets a job, gets married, and becomes a productive worker in the community. He is subsequently convicted of a felony, such as making false statements on a loan application. As a result, the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) brings deportation proceedings against him. The individual will seek any means possible to vacate the conviction, in order to stay in this country.' This Article explores whether the writ of audita querela. primarily used to provide post-judgment relief in civil cases at common law, can be used to challenge criminal convictions ...


Criminal Procedure—Probable Cause—A Bright-Line Time Limit: The Constitution Requires A Probable Cause Determination Within Forty-Eight Hours Of Arrest. County Of Riverside V. Mclaughlin,, Gregory Taylor Jan 1992

Criminal Procedure—Probable Cause—A Bright-Line Time Limit: The Constitution Requires A Probable Cause Determination Within Forty-Eight Hours Of Arrest. County Of Riverside V. Mclaughlin,, Gregory Taylor

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


How Long Is Too Long? When Pretrial Detention Violates Due Process, Floralynn Einesman Jan 1992

How Long Is Too Long? When Pretrial Detention Violates Due Process, Floralynn Einesman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Review Essay: Feminism, Lawyering, And Death Row, Joan W. Howarth Jan 1992

Review Essay: Feminism, Lawyering, And Death Row, Joan W. Howarth

Scholarly Works

Representing men on death row is confounding, but not without reward. This lawyering work has taught me at least two lessons, the subjects of this essay. First, capital punishment--our attempt to use legal procedures to kill people fairly--is a feminist issue, or should be. Second, death row representation is too big a job for lawyers; we need to recruit poets. To develop these ideas, and perhaps to convince you without requiring you to undertake the same path to these conclusions, I am appropriating novelist Beverly Lowry's stunning new book, Crossed Over: A Murder, A Memoir. Crossed Over is the ...


An Analysis Of Plea Bargaining, Gabriela Aceves Jan 1992

An Analysis Of Plea Bargaining, Gabriela Aceves

Theses Digitization Project

No abstract provided.


Procedural Due Process In Guidelines Sentencing, Susan Herman Jan 1992

Procedural Due Process In Guidelines Sentencing, Susan Herman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Tail That Wagged The Dog: Bifurcated Factfinding Under The Federal Sentencing Guidelines And The Limits Of Due Process, Susan Herman Jan 1992

The Tail That Wagged The Dog: Bifurcated Factfinding Under The Federal Sentencing Guidelines And The Limits Of Due Process, Susan Herman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Thelma And Louise And Bonnie And Jean: Images Of Women As Criminals, Susan Herman Jan 1992

Thelma And Louise And Bonnie And Jean: Images Of Women As Criminals, Susan Herman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


An Asymmetrical Approach To The Problem Of Peremptories?, Richard D. Friedman Jan 1992

An Asymmetrical Approach To The Problem Of Peremptories?, Richard D. Friedman

Articles

The Supreme Court's decision in Batson v. Kentucky, and the extension of Batson to parties other than prosecutors, may be expected to put pressure on the institution of peremptory challenges. After a brief review of the history of peremptories, this article contends that peremptories for criminal defendants serve important values of our criminal justice system. It then argues that peremptories for prosecutors are not as important, and that it may no longer be worthwhile to maintain them in light of the administrative complexities inevitable in a system of peremptories consistent with Batson. The article concludes that the asymmetry of ...


The Reasonable Women And The Ordinary Man, Carol Sanger Jan 1992

The Reasonable Women And The Ordinary Man, Carol Sanger

Faculty Scholarship

Nineteen ninety-one was a seismic year for sexual harassment. The first localized shift occurred in January, when the Ninth Circuit established that the standard by which sexual harassment in the workplace would be judged was no longer the reasonable man or even the reasonable person but rather the reasonable woman. In October a larger audience felt a much stronger jolt when Anita Hill spoke before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Hill testified that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her while she worked for him at the Department of Education and at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Her testimony ...


The Reasonable Woman And The Ordinary Man, Carol Sanger Jan 1992

The Reasonable Woman And The Ordinary Man, Carol Sanger

Faculty Scholarship

... Objections to the reasonable woman standard [for sexual harassment] combine doctrinal concerns with practical ones. The doctrinal question is something like, Whatever happened to gender neutrality? How are men supposed to know what conduct strikes their victims as intimidating, hostile, or offensive? After all, women are so sensitive – take Anita Hill. Why, as men often ask, can't women be more reasonable? ...

The answer is that at least in determining what behavior is sexually harassing, women are not like men. As many feminists have explained, women commonly experience as fearful what men find fun. ...


A Reply: Imperfect Bargains, Imperfect Trials, And Innocent Defendants, Robert E. Scott Jan 1992

A Reply: Imperfect Bargains, Imperfect Trials, And Innocent Defendants, Robert E. Scott

Faculty Scholarship

To understand what is and is not wrong with plea bargaining, one must understand the relationship of bargains to trials. Unsurprisingly, we disagree with much of what Judge Frank Easterbrook and Professor Stephen Schulhofer say about that relationship. Most of those disagreements need not be rehearsed here; readers attentive enough to wade through their essays and ours will pick up the key points readily enough. But there is one point where the dispute is at once sharp and hidden. It has to do with the fact that both trials and bargains are flawed.

That fact might seem obvious, but the ...


Plea-Bargaining As A Social Contract, Robert E. Scott, William J. Stuntz Jan 1992

Plea-Bargaining As A Social Contract, Robert E. Scott, William J. Stuntz

Faculty Scholarship

Most criminal prosecutions are settled without a trial. The parties to these settlements trade various risks and entitlements: the defendant relinquishes the right to go to trial (along with any chance of acquittal), while the prosecutor gives up the entitlement to seek the highest sentence or pursue the most serious charges possible. The resulting bargains differ predictably from what would have happened had the same cases been taken to trial. Defendants who bargain for a plea serve lower sentences than those who do not. On the other hand, everyone who pleads guilty is, by definition, convicted, while a substantial minority ...


Judgment And Reasoning In Adolescent Decisionmaking, Elizabeth S. Scott Jan 1992

Judgment And Reasoning In Adolescent Decisionmaking, Elizabeth S. Scott

Faculty Scholarship

Few people believe that five year olds and fifteen year olds think, act or make decisions in the same way. The question is whether and how the law should respond to developmental differences. Traditionally, childhood and adulthood have been two dichotomous legal categories, demarcated by the age of majority. This conception has been contested in recent years, as has the premise that all minors are incompetent to make decisions and function as legal actors. Fueled by the controversy over adolescent access to abortion, an advocacy movement has emerged that challenges the authority of parents and the state over the lives ...


The Individualized-Consideration Principle And The Death Penalty As Cruel And Unusual Punishment, Ronald J. Mann Jan 1992

The Individualized-Consideration Principle And The Death Penalty As Cruel And Unusual Punishment, Ronald J. Mann

Faculty Scholarship

The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits infliction of "cruel and unusual punishments." The Supreme Court established the basic principles applying this amendment to the death penalty during a six-year period in the 1970's. First, in 1972, in Furman v. Georgia, the Court invalidated all then-existing death penalty statutes. Second, in 1976, in Gregg v. Georgia and its companions, the Court upheld some of the statutes promulgated in response to Furman but invalidated others. Finally, in 1978, in Lockett v. Ohio, the Court invalidated an Ohio statute because it failed to give the sentencer a sufficient opportunity ...


Paradigms Lost: The Blurring Of The Criminal And Civil Law Models – And What Can Be Done About It, John C. Coffee Jr. Jan 1992

Paradigms Lost: The Blurring Of The Criminal And Civil Law Models – And What Can Be Done About It, John C. Coffee Jr.

Faculty Scholarship

Ken Mann's professed goal is to "shrink" the criminal law. To realize this worthy end, he advocates punitive civil sanctions that would largely parallel criminal sanctions, thereby reducing the need to use criminal law in order to achieve punitive purposes. I agree (heartily) with the end he seeks and even more with his general precept that "the criminal law should be reserved for the most damaging wrongs and the most culpable defendants." But I believe that the means he proposes would be counterproductive – and would probably expand, rather than contract, the operative scope of the criminal law as an ...


Standards Of Review In Illinois Criminal Cases: The Need For Major Reform, 17 S. Ill. U. L.J. 51 (1992), Timothy P. O'Neill Jan 1992

Standards Of Review In Illinois Criminal Cases: The Need For Major Reform, 17 S. Ill. U. L.J. 51 (1992), Timothy P. O'Neill

UIC John Marshall Law School Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Annual Survey Of Virginia Law: Criminal Law And Procedure, Steven D. Benjamin Jan 1992

Annual Survey Of Virginia Law: Criminal Law And Procedure, Steven D. Benjamin

University of Richmond Law Review

During the past year, the Virginia Court of Appeals continued to be the primary contributor to the development of substantive and procedural criminal law in Virginia. As it has in years past, the court ruled on numerous Fourth Amendment questions, particularly with respect to investigatory detention. Other significant rulings dealt with double jeopardy, discovery, due process, and trial procedure.


Civil Forfeiture Of Property For Drug Offenders Under Illinois And Federal Statute: Zero Tolerance, Zero Exceptions, 25 J. Marshall L. Rev. 389 (1992), T. J. Hiles Jan 1992

Civil Forfeiture Of Property For Drug Offenders Under Illinois And Federal Statute: Zero Tolerance, Zero Exceptions, 25 J. Marshall L. Rev. 389 (1992), T. J. Hiles

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.