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Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

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Effect Of Recovery On The Recrystallized Grain-Size Of High Purity Aluminum, Rodney L. Helterline Jun 1954

Effect Of Recovery On The Recrystallized Grain-Size Of High Purity Aluminum, Rodney L. Helterline

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

When a cold-worked metal is annealed, it’s physical properties hange as a result of a new grain structure. The annealing treatment is divided into three stages according to the changes that occur in the distorted metal: (1) recovery, (2) recrystallization, and (3) grain growth.


Recrystallization Of High Purity Aluminum, Virgil H. Griswold Jr. May 1953

Recrystallization Of High Purity Aluminum, Virgil H. Griswold Jr.

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

If a metal is first cold-worked and then heated to a sufficient temperature for an adequate length of time, the hardening properties due to cold-working disappear, and the metal will return more or less to its original state. Upon examination of the microstructure, we find that new grains have replaced the old grains through what is called recrystallization. The final size of the recrystallized grains depends upon three important variables--the degree of cold-work or deforma­tion, annealing temperature, and annealing time.


Protective Refractory Coatings On Titanium Metal, Eugene F. Gibbs May 1952

Protective Refractory Coatings On Titanium Metal, Eugene F. Gibbs

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

The problem undertaken in this thesis concerns the development of a newer phase of metallurgy, namely the adaption of the strong, lightweight metal titanium to high-temperature uses. The primary objective of the investigation is to determine wheth­er the application of refractory coatings to titanium will pro­tect the metal from chemical reactions and corrosion at high temperatures.


An Investigation Of Silicon Impregnation Of Low-Carbon Steels, Thomas E. Groce May 1949

An Investigation Of Silicon Impregnation Of Low-Carbon Steels, Thomas E. Groce

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

A problem of metallurgy during the last part of the Nineteenth and the early Twentieth Century, and one that stood very near the front, was investigations of methods to produce a non-corrosive surface on iron and steel without affecting the physical properties of these base metals.


Methods Of Determining Porosity And Spatter Losses Of Arc Welds, Campbell W. F. Funk Feb 1944

Methods Of Determining Porosity And Spatter Losses Of Arc Welds, Campbell W. F. Funk

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

The original objective of this project was to determine the effect of varying current intensity and electrode coating composition upon the spatter losses and porosity of arc welds made by alternating current. This subject was suggested by the Welding Research Council of the Engineering Foundation, which is a clearing house for welding research in order to avoid du­plication of work.


Some Leaching Characteristics Of The Butte Rhodochrosite, W. L. Slosson May 1942

Some Leaching Characteristics Of The Butte Rhodochrosite, W. L. Slosson

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

With the increasing importance of manganese in the metallurgical fields of today and tomorrow, ex­tensive work along the lines of its successful ex­ploitation has been accomplished by many investiga­tors. Since tie current world situation has shut off most of our supply of high-grade manganese ores from foreign sources, the low-grade domestic deposits have entered the fields of investigation very rapidly.


An Experimental Investigation Of The Age Hardening Of Copper With Manganese Silicide, Ali Kozak May 1941

An Experimental Investigation Of The Age Hardening Of Copper With Manganese Silicide, Ali Kozak

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

The subject of the thesis was based upon the theory of precipitation or age hardening of the copper by the compound formed by the Manganese and silicon present in the ternary Cu-Mn-Si alloy. The effect of the heat treat­ment to such an alloy was to be studied and the best aging time and temperature was to be determined.


A Study Of Metallic Eutectics, Robert P. Corbett May 1940

A Study Of Metallic Eutectics, Robert P. Corbett

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

All of the metals have definite melting points. When a metal is heated above the melting point, it exists as a liquid. Now if the melt is allowed to cool, it will solidify when a temperature corresponding to the melting point is reached.

However, if one metal is added to another metal, both of which are mutually soluble in the liquid state, a certain effect can be noted. The melt will not solid­ify when the melting point of the pure metal is reached, but will freeze at a lower temperature.


The Age Hardening Of Silver With Copper-Silicide, Joseph Edward Shaw May 1939

The Age Hardening Of Silver With Copper-Silicide, Joseph Edward Shaw

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

The successful application of the phenomenon of pre­cipitation hardening to aluminum and copper has indicated the possibility of hardening all metals in the same way. The phenomenon of age hardening was discoveredin 1911, and since that time much research has been car­ried on in all parts of the world on various alloy sys­tems.


The Age Hardening Of Copper With Manganese Silicide., Gordon A. Davis May 1939

The Age Hardening Of Copper With Manganese Silicide., Gordon A. Davis

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

The increase in hardness is attributed to the manganese silicide being precipitated from solid solution and deposited between crystal planes. The subsequent softening which occurs on prolonging the period of reheating is believed to be due to an agglomeration of the dispersed hardening agent.


The Age-Hardening Of Duralumin, Allison Richard Dyer May 1934

The Age-Hardening Of Duralumin, Allison Richard Dyer

Bachelors Theses and Reports, 1928 - 1970

The development of wrought alloys of aluminum to which high strength and ductility can be imparted by heat treatment began with the work of Wilm and Claesser in Germany, 1905­-1911. During this time an alloy was developed which was later commercially produced in that country under the tradename of duralumin. The need for strong, light alloys for aircraft during the World War greatly hastened the development of duralumin.