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Series

2005

US Army Research

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Operations Research, Systems Engineering and Industrial Engineering

Effects Of Food Attributes And Feeding Environment On Acceptance, Consumption And Body Weight: Lessons Learned In A Twenty-Year Program Of Military Ration Research, Edward S. Hirsch, F. Matthew Kramer, Herbert L. Meiselman Jan 2005

Effects Of Food Attributes And Feeding Environment On Acceptance, Consumption And Body Weight: Lessons Learned In A Twenty-Year Program Of Military Ration Research, Edward S. Hirsch, F. Matthew Kramer, Herbert L. Meiselman

US Army Research

Twenty years of testing in the field has consistently revealed that food intake is inadequate when packaged military rations are fed as the sole source of food. Food intake is much lower and there is a loss of body weight. Conversely when these rations are fed to students or military personnel for periods ranging from 3 to 42 days in a cafeteria-like setting, food intake is comparable to levels of a control group provided with freshly prepared food. Under these conditions, body weight is maintained. In this review, the consumption pattern is considered in terms of characteristics of the food ...


Immobilization Of A Catalytic Dna Molecular Beacon On Au For Pb(Ii) Detection, Carla B. Swearingen, Daryl P. Wernette, Donald M. Cropek, Yi Lu, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Paul W. Bohn Jan 2005

Immobilization Of A Catalytic Dna Molecular Beacon On Au For Pb(Ii) Detection, Carla B. Swearingen, Daryl P. Wernette, Donald M. Cropek, Yi Lu, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Paul W. Bohn

US Army Research

A Pb(II)-specific DNAzyme fluorescent sensor has been modified with a thiol moiety in order to immobilize it on a Au surface. Self-assembly of the DNAzyme is accomplished by first adsorbing the single-thiolated enzyme strand (HS-17E-Dy) followed by adsorption of mercaptohexanol, which serves to displace any Au-N interactions and ensure that DNA is bound only through the Sheadgroup. The preformed self-assembled monolayer is then hybridized with the complementary fluorophorecontaining substrate strand (17DS-Fl). Upon reaction with Pb(II), the substrate strand is cleaved, releasing a fluorescent fragment for detection. Fluorescence intensity may be correlated with original Pb(II) concentration, and ...


Coronary Calcium Independently Predicts Incident Premature Coronary Heart Disease Over Measured Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Allen J. Taylor, Jody Bindeman, Irwin Feuerstein, Felix Cao, Michael Brazaitis, Patrick G. O'Malley Jan 2005

Coronary Calcium Independently Predicts Incident Premature Coronary Heart Disease Over Measured Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Allen J. Taylor, Jody Bindeman, Irwin Feuerstein, Felix Cao, Michael Brazaitis, Patrick G. O'Malley

US Army Research

OBJECTIVES - We sought to examine the independent predictive value of coronary artery calcium detection for coronary outcomes in a non-referred cohort of healthy men and women ages 40 to 50 years.

BACKGROUND - Existing studies have suggested that coronary calcium might have incremental predictive value for coronary outcomes above standard coronary risk factors. However, additional data from non-referred and younger populations are needed.

METHODS - Participants (n = 2,000; mean age 43 years) were evaluated with measured coronary risk variables and coronary calcium detected with electron beam tomography. Incident acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death were ascertained via annual telephonic contacts ...


Towards An Rts,S-Based, Multi-Stage, Multi-Antigen Vaccine Against Falciparum Malaria: Progress At The Walter Reed Army Institute Of Research, D. Gray Heppner Jr., Kent E. Kester, Christian F. Ockenhouse, Nadia Tornieporth, Opokua Ofori, Jeffrey A. Lyon, V. Ann Stewart, Patrice Dubois, David E. Lanar, Urszula Krzych, Philippe Moris, Evelina Angov, James F. Cummings, Amanda Leach, B. Ted Hall, Sheetij Dutta, Robert Schwenk, Collette Hillier, Arnoldo Barbosa, Lisa A. Ware, Lalitha Nair, Christian A. Darko, Mark R. Withers, Bernhards Ogutu, Mark E. Polhemus, Mark Fukuda, Sathit Pichyangkul, Montip Gettyacamin, Carter Diggs, Lorraine Soisson, Jessica Milman, Marie-Claude Dubois, Nathalie Garcon, Kathryn Tucker, Janet Wittes, Christopher V. Plowe, Mahamadou A. Thera, Ogobara K. Duombo, Maria G. Pau, Jaap Goudsmit, W. Ripley Ballou, Joe Cohen Jan 2005

Towards An Rts,S-Based, Multi-Stage, Multi-Antigen Vaccine Against Falciparum Malaria: Progress At The Walter Reed Army Institute Of Research, D. Gray Heppner Jr., Kent E. Kester, Christian F. Ockenhouse, Nadia Tornieporth, Opokua Ofori, Jeffrey A. Lyon, V. Ann Stewart, Patrice Dubois, David E. Lanar, Urszula Krzych, Philippe Moris, Evelina Angov, James F. Cummings, Amanda Leach, B. Ted Hall, Sheetij Dutta, Robert Schwenk, Collette Hillier, Arnoldo Barbosa, Lisa A. Ware, Lalitha Nair, Christian A. Darko, Mark R. Withers, Bernhards Ogutu, Mark E. Polhemus, Mark Fukuda, Sathit Pichyangkul, Montip Gettyacamin, Carter Diggs, Lorraine Soisson, Jessica Milman, Marie-Claude Dubois, Nathalie Garcon, Kathryn Tucker, Janet Wittes, Christopher V. Plowe, Mahamadou A. Thera, Ogobara K. Duombo, Maria G. Pau, Jaap Goudsmit, W. Ripley Ballou, Joe Cohen

US Army Research

The goal of the Malaria Vaccine Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) is to develop a licensed multi-antigen, multi-stage vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum able to prevent all symptomatic manifestations of malaria by preventing parasitemia. A secondary goal is to limit disease in vaccinees that do develop malaria. Malaria prevention will be achieved by inducing humoral and cellular immunity against the pre-erythrocytic circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the liver stage antigen-1 (LSA-1). The strategy to limit disease will target immune responses against one or more blood stage antigens, merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) and apical merozoite antigen-1 (AMA-1). The ...


Miniaturized Lead Sensor Based On Lead-Specific Dnazyme In A Nanocapillary Interconnected Microfluidic Device, In-Hyoung Chang, Joseph J. Tulock, Juewen Liu, Won-Suk Kim, Donald M. Cannon, Jr., Yi Lu, Paul W. Bohn, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Donald M. Cropek Jan 2005

Miniaturized Lead Sensor Based On Lead-Specific Dnazyme In A Nanocapillary Interconnected Microfluidic Device, In-Hyoung Chang, Joseph J. Tulock, Juewen Liu, Won-Suk Kim, Donald M. Cannon, Jr., Yi Lu, Paul W. Bohn, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Donald M. Cropek

US Army Research

A miniaturized lead sensor has been developed by combining a lead-specific DNAzyme with a microfabricated device containing a network of microfluidic channels that are fluidically coupled via a nanocapillary array interconnect. A DNAzyme construct, selective for cleavage in the presence of Pb2+ and derivatized with fluorophore (quencher) at the 5’ (3’) end of the substrate and enzyme strands, respectively, forms a molecular beacon that is used as the recognition element. The nanocapillary array membrane interconnect is used to manipulate fluid flows and deliver the small-volume sample to the beacon in a spatially confined detection window where the DNAzyme is ...


Conformational Sampling Of The Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain: Implications For Inhibitor Binding, James C. Burnett, James J. Schmidt, Connor F. Mcgrath, Tam L. Nguyen, Ann R. Hermone, Rekha G. Panchal, Jonathan L. Vennerstrom, Krishna Kodukula, Daniel W. Zaharevitz, Rick Gussio, Sina Bavari Jan 2005

Conformational Sampling Of The Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Light Chain: Implications For Inhibitor Binding, James C. Burnett, James J. Schmidt, Connor F. Mcgrath, Tam L. Nguyen, Ann R. Hermone, Rekha G. Panchal, Jonathan L. Vennerstrom, Krishna Kodukula, Daniel W. Zaharevitz, Rick Gussio, Sina Bavari

US Army Research

Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent of the known biological toxins, and consequently are listed as category A biowarfare agents. Currently, the only treatments against BoNTs include preventative antitoxins and long-term supportive care. Consequently, there is an urgent need for therapeutics to counter these enzymes––post exposure. In a previous study, we identified a number of small, nonpeptidic lead inhibitors of BoNT serotype A light chain (BoNT/A LC) metalloprotease activity, and we identified a common pharmacophore for these molecules. In this study, we have focused on how the dynamic movement of amino acid residues in and surrounding the ...


Food Acceptability In Field Studies With Us Army Men And Women: Relationship With Food Intake And Food Choice After Repeated Exposures, Cees De Graaf, F. Matthew Kramer, Herbert L. Meiselman, Larry L. Lesher, Carol Baker-Fulco, Edward S. Hirsch, John Warber Jan 2005

Food Acceptability In Field Studies With Us Army Men And Women: Relationship With Food Intake And Food Choice After Repeated Exposures, Cees De Graaf, F. Matthew Kramer, Herbert L. Meiselman, Larry L. Lesher, Carol Baker-Fulco, Edward S. Hirsch, John Warber

US Army Research

Laboratory data with single exposures showed that palatability has a positive relationship with food intake. The question addressed in this study is whether this relationship also holds over repeated exposures in non-laboratory contexts in more natural environments. The data were collected in four field studies, lasting 4–11 days with 307 US Army men and 119 Army women, and comprised 5791 main meals and 8831 snacks in total. Acceptability was rated on the nine point hedonic scale, and intake was registered in units of 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, or 1 or more times of the provided portion size ...


Brown Recluse Spider Bite To The Face, Daniel C. Madion, Melanie K. Marshall, Christopher D. Jenkins, George M. Kushner Jan 2005

Brown Recluse Spider Bite To The Face, Daniel C. Madion, Melanie K. Marshall, Christopher D. Jenkins, George M. Kushner

US Army Research

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must be prepared to manage a variety of maxillofacial infections, both odontogenic and non-odontogenic in nature. While odontogenic infections are quite common, non-odontogenic infections can present with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. An uncommon non-odontogenic infection is the cellulitis secondary to a spider bite.
Few spider species have the ability to bite through human skin. Most of these insults result in only a small, red nodule centered within a larger, erythematous plaque. Symptoms are usually limited to pruritus and perhaps mild tenderness. The brown recluse and the black widow are 2 types of spiders that inhabit the ...