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Full-Text Articles in Operations Research, Systems Engineering and Industrial Engineering

Design By Taking Perspectives: How Engineers Explore Problems, Jaclyn K. Murray, Jaryn A. Studer, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Mckilligan, Colleen M. Seifert Apr 2019

Design By Taking Perspectives: How Engineers Explore Problems, Jaclyn K. Murray, Jaryn A. Studer, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Mckilligan, Colleen M. Seifert

Industrial Design Publications

Background: Problem exploration includes identifying, framing, and defining design problems and bounding problem spaces. Intentional and unintentional changes in problem understanding naturally occur as designers explore design problems to create solutions. Through problem exploration, new perspectives on the problem can emerge along with new and diverse ideas for solutions. By considering multiple problem perspectives varying in scope and focus, designers position themselves to increase their understandings of the “real” problem and engage in more diverse idea generation processes leading to an increasing variety of potential solutions.

Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to investigate systematic patterns in problem ...


Evidence Of Problem Exploration In Creative Designs, Jaryn A. Studer, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Mckilligan, Colleen M. Seifert Nov 2018

Evidence Of Problem Exploration In Creative Designs, Jaryn A. Studer, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Mckilligan, Colleen M. Seifert

Industrial Design Publications

Design problems are often presented as structured briefs with detailed constraints and requirements, suggesting a fixed definition. However, past studies have identified the importance of exploring design problems for creative design outcomes. Previous protocol studies of designers has shown that problems can “co-evolve” with the development of solutions during the design process. But to date, little evidence has been provided about howdesigners systematically explore presented problems to create better solutions. In this study, we conducted a qualitative analysis of 252 design problems collected from publically available sources, including award-winning product designs and open-source design competitions. This database offers an independent ...


Strategies To Redefine The Problem Exploration Space For Design Innovation, Seda Mckilligan, Samantha L. Creeger Sep 2018

Strategies To Redefine The Problem Exploration Space For Design Innovation, Seda Mckilligan, Samantha L. Creeger

Industrial Design Conference Presentations, Posters and Proceedings

Designers are used to solving problems that are given to them, leading them to focus on creating feasible solutions rather than exploring novel perspectives on the presented problems. Creative innovations in problem understanding may lead directly to more innovation solutions. Although problem exploration has been identified as a key process in design thinking, how designers restructure and reframe the problem is not fully examined. The present work aimed to understand how designers intentionally explore variants of problems on the way to solutions. Through an empirical study industrial design students, we documented a high degree of variation in the problem perspectives ...


Innovative Solutions Through Innovated Problems, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Mckilligan, Jaryn A. Studer, Jaclyn K. Murray, Colleen M. Seifert Jan 2018

Innovative Solutions Through Innovated Problems, Shanna R. Daly, Seda Mckilligan, Jaryn A. Studer, Jaclyn K. Murray, Colleen M. Seifert

Industrial Design Publications

Designers are accustomed to solving problems that are provided to them; in fact, common practice in engineering is to present the problem with carefully delineated and detailed constraints required for a promising solution. As a consequence, engineers focus on creating feasible solutions rather than exploring novel perspectives on the presented problems. However, the Engineer of 2020 needs to respond with innovations for multiple and dynamic user needs, diverse users and cultures, and rapidly changing technologies. These complex demands require engineering students to learn that problems are not ‘‘fixed’’ as presented, and to build the habit of exploring alternative perspectives on ...