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Articles 31 - 35 of 35

Full-Text Articles in Nuclear Engineering

Photon Ct Scanning Of Advanced Ceramic Materials, B. D. Sawicka, W. A. Ellingson Jan 1987

Photon Ct Scanning Of Advanced Ceramic Materials, B. D. Sawicka, W. A. Ellingson

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Advanced ceramic materials (e. g. Si3N4, ZrO2, SiC, A12O3) are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems [1]. Although fracture toughness has been a constant problem, advanced ceramics are now being developed with fracture toughnesses close to those of metals [2]. Small size flaws (10–200 μm), small non-uniformities in density distributions (0.1–2%) present as long-range density gradients, and porous regions which can be seen as localized areas of slightly lower density, are critical in most ceramics. The need to detect these small flaws is causing a significant effort ...


On The Ultrasonic Imaging Of Tube/Support Structure Of Power Plant Steam Generators, Jafar Saniie, Daniel T. Nagle Jan 1987

On The Ultrasonic Imaging Of Tube/Support Structure Of Power Plant Steam Generators, Jafar Saniie, Daniel T. Nagle

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

The corrosion and erosion of steam generator tubing in nuclear power plants can present problems of both safety and economics. In steam generators, the inconel tubes are fit loosely through holes drilled in carbon steel support plates. Corrosion is of particular concern with such tube/support plate structures. Non-protective magnetite can build up on the inner surface of the support plate holes, and allowed to continue unchecked, will fill the gap, eventually denting and fracturing the tube walls. Therefore, periodic nondestructive inspection can be valuable in characterizing corrosion and can be used in evaluating the effectiveness of chemical treatments used ...


A Real-Time Saft System Applied To The Ultrasonic Inspection Of Nuclear Reactor Components, T. E. Hall, S. R. Doctor, L. D. Reid Jan 1987

A Real-Time Saft System Applied To The Ultrasonic Inspection Of Nuclear Reactor Components, T. E. Hall, S. R. Doctor, L. D. Reid

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

In 1982 Pacific Northwest Laboratory began activity under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to implement SAFT technology in a field usable system. The University of Michigan had previously laid the groundwork by performing extensive research related to the development of the SAFT algorithm in the area of ultrasonics and the investigation of ways to improve the computation time [1,2]. The task given PNL was to deploy the results of this research effort by developing an instrument that would perform in-service inspection of nuclear reactor components using the SAFT-UT algorithm.


Image Processing And Artificial Intelligence For Detection And Interpretation Of Ultrasonic Test Signals, Keith S. Pickens, John C. Lusth, Pamela K. Fink, Karol K. Palmer, Earnest A. Franke Jan 1987

Image Processing And Artificial Intelligence For Detection And Interpretation Of Ultrasonic Test Signals, Keith S. Pickens, John C. Lusth, Pamela K. Fink, Karol K. Palmer, Earnest A. Franke

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Detection of flaws is an important industrial concern. For example, aircraft and nuclear-power reactor owners and regulatory authorities need effective means of detecting flaws that could pose a threat to public safety. Operators of costly equipment require information on service-induced flaws to be able to make run-or-retire decisions. As the cost of parts and concerns for public safety increase, the importance of flaw detection and size estimation has likewise escalated.


Nuclear Resonance For The Nondestructive Evaluation Of Structural Materials, G A. Matzkanin Jan 1977

Nuclear Resonance For The Nondestructive Evaluation Of Structural Materials, G A. Matzkanin

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

It is appropriate that this presentation is in a session on new techniques because the program I will discuss this afternoon is sufficiently new that few concrete results are available to report. The program I will discuss was recently funded at Southwest Research Institute by AFOSR and involves examining the possibility of developing nuclear resonance techniques for the nondestructive evaluation of structural materials. What I hope to do this afternoon is to fill you in a bit with regard to the background involved in this program and bring you up to date regarding our research plans. I will discuss some ...