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Computer Engineering Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Computer Engineering

Determining Unique Agents By Evaluating Web Form Interaction, Ben Cooley Jan 2016

Determining Unique Agents By Evaluating Web Form Interaction, Ben Cooley

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Because of the inherent risks in today’s online activities, it becomes imperative to identify a malicious user masquerading as someone else. Incorporating biometric analysis enhances the confidence of authenticating valid users over the Internet while providing additional layers of security with no hindrance to the end user. Through the analysis of traffic patterns and HTTP Header analysis, the detection and early refusal of robot agents plays a great role in reducing fraudulent login attempts.


Product Authentication Using Hash Chains And Printed Qr Codes, Harshith R. Keni Jan 2016

Product Authentication Using Hash Chains And Printed Qr Codes, Harshith R. Keni

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis explores the usage of simple printed tags for authenticating products. Printed tags are a cheap alternative to RFID and other tag based systems and do not require specialized equipment. Due to the simplistic nature of such printed codes, many security issues like tag impersonation, server impersonation, reader impersonation, replay attacks and denial of service present in RFID based solutions need to be handled differently. An algorithm that utilizes hash chains to secure such simple tags while still keeping cost low is discussed. The security characteristics of this scheme as well as other product authentication schemes that use RFID ...


Categorization Of Security Design Patterns, Jeremiah Y. Dangler May 2013

Categorization Of Security Design Patterns, Jeremiah Y. Dangler

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Strategies for software development often slight security-related considerations, due to the difficulty of developing realizable requirements, identifying and applying appropriate techniques, and teaching secure design. This work describes a three-part strategy for addressing these concerns. Part 1 provides detailed questions, derived from a two-level characterization of system security based on work by Chung et. al., to elicit precise requirements. Part 2 uses a novel framework for relating this characterization to previously published strategies, or patterns, for secure software development. Included case studies suggest the framework's effectiveness, involving the application of three patterns for secure design (Limited View, Role-Based Access ...