Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Computer Engineering Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

University of Texas at El Paso

JML language

2007

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Computer Engineering

A Fitness Function To Find Feasible Sequences Of Method Calls For Evolutionary Testing Of Object-Oriented Programs, Myoung Yee Kim, Yoonsik Cheon Nov 2007

A Fitness Function To Find Feasible Sequences Of Method Calls For Evolutionary Testing Of Object-Oriented Programs, Myoung Yee Kim, Yoonsik Cheon

Departmental Technical Reports (CS)

In evolutionary testing of an object-oriented program, the search objective is to find a sequence of method calls that can successfully produce a test object of an interesting state. This is challenging because not all call sequences are feasible; each call of a sequence has to meet the assumption of the called method. The effectiveness of an evolutionary testing thus depends in part on the quality of the so-called fitness function that determines the degree of the fitness of a candidate solution. In this paper, we propose a new fitness function based on assertions such as method preconditions to find ...


A Quick Tutorial On Jet, Yoonsik Cheon Jun 2007

A Quick Tutorial On Jet, Yoonsik Cheon

Departmental Technical Reports (CS)

JET is an automated unit testing tool for Java classes annotated with JML specifications; JML is a formal interface specification language for Java to document the behavior of Java classes and interfaces. JET tests each method of the class under test separately. For each method, it generates a collection of test data, executes them, and decides test results (i.e., pass/fail) by using JML specifications as test oracles, thereby fully automating unit testing of Java classes. This document gives a quick tutorial introduction to JET.


Abstraction In Assertion-Based Test Oracles, Yoonsik Cheon Jun 2007

Abstraction In Assertion-Based Test Oracles, Yoonsik Cheon

Departmental Technical Reports (CS)

Assertions can be used as test oracles. However, writing effective assertions of right abstraction levels is difficult because on the one hand, detailed assertions are preferred for through testing (i.e., to detect as many errors as possible), but on the other hand abstract assertions are preferred for readability, maintainability, and reusability. As assertions become a practical tool for testing and debugging programs, this is an important and practical problem to solve for the effective use of assertions. We advocate the use of model variables---specification-only variables of which abstract values are given as mappings from concrete program states---to write abstract ...


Random Test Data Generation For Java Classes Annotated With Jml Specifications, Yoonsik Cheon, Carlos E. Rubio-Medrano Mar 2007

Random Test Data Generation For Java Classes Annotated With Jml Specifications, Yoonsik Cheon, Carlos E. Rubio-Medrano

Departmental Technical Reports (CS)

The hidden states of objects create a barrier to designing and generating test data automatically. For example, the state of an object has to be established indirectly through a sequence of method invocations. For a non-trivial class, however, it is extremely unlikely that a randomly-chosen sequence of method invocations can construct an object successfully, as each invocation has to satisfy the state invariants. Nonetheless, automated random testing can reduce the cost of testing dramatically and has potential for finding errors that are difficult to find in other ways because it eliminates the subjectiveness in constructing test data. We propose a ...


Automated Random Testing To Detect Specification-Code Inconsistencies, Yoonsik Cheon Jan 2007

Automated Random Testing To Detect Specification-Code Inconsistencies, Yoonsik Cheon

Departmental Technical Reports (CS)

An interface specification language such as JML provides a means to document precisely the behavior of program modules such as Java classes, and it is being adopted by industry. However, few practical tools exist for programmers to assure the correctness of their interface specifications. Nonetheless, the correctness of an interface specification is a prerequisite for the use of the specification, both as a precise API documentation and as a foundation for formal verification of and reasoning about the implementation. We propose automated random testing as a practical tool to assure the correctness of interface specifications. The key idea of our ...