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Full-Text Articles in Computer Engineering

Metrics, Software Engineering, Small Systems – The Future Of Systems Development, William L. Honig Jun 2016

Metrics, Software Engineering, Small Systems – The Future Of Systems Development, William L. Honig

Computer Science: Faculty Publications and Other Works

In this talk I will introduce the importance of metrics, or measures, and the role they play in the development of high quality computer systems. I will review some key mega trends in computer science over the last three decades and then explain why I believe the trend to small networked systems, along with metrics and software engineering will define the future of high technology computer based systems.

I first learned about metrics at the Bell System where everything was measured. Metrics can be understood easily if you think of them as measures, for example of calories or salt in ...


An Example Of Atomic Requirements - Login Screen, William L. Honig May 2016

An Example Of Atomic Requirements - Login Screen, William L. Honig

Computer Science: Faculty Publications and Other Works

A simple example of what an atomic or individual or singular requirement statement should be. Using the example of the familiar login screen, shows the evolution from a low quality initial attempt at requirements to a complete atomic requirement statement. Introduces the idea of a system glossary to support the atomic requirement.


Atomic Requirements Quick Notes, William L. Honig, Shingo Takada May 2016

Atomic Requirements Quick Notes, William L. Honig, Shingo Takada

Computer Science: Faculty Publications and Other Works

Working paper on atomic requirements for systems development and the importance of singular, cohesive, individual requirements statements. Covers possible definitions of atomic requirements, and their characteristics. Atomic requirements improve many parts of the development process from requirements to testing and contracting.


Introduction To Atomic Requirements, William L. Honig Apr 2016

Introduction To Atomic Requirements, William L. Honig

Computer Science: Faculty Publications and Other Works

An introduction to requirements and the importance of making single atomic requirements statements. Atomic requirements have advantages and improve the requirements process, support requirement verification and validation, enable traceability, support testability of systems, and provide management advantages.

Why has there been so little emphasis on atomic requirements?


Requirements Metrics - Definitions Of A Working List Of Possible Metrics For Requirements Quality, William L. Honig Mar 2016

Requirements Metrics - Definitions Of A Working List Of Possible Metrics For Requirements Quality, William L. Honig

Computer Science: Faculty Publications and Other Works

A work in progress to define a metrics set for requirements. Metrics are defined that apply to either the entire requirements set (requirements document as a whole) or individual atomic (or singular, individual) requirements statements. Requirements are identified with standard names and a identification scheme and include both subjective and objective measures.

An example metric for the full set of requirements: Rd2 - Requirements Consistency, Is the set of atomic requirements internally consistent, with no contradictions, no duplication between individual requirements? An example of a metric for a single requirement: Ra4 - Requirement Verifiability, How adequately can this requirement be tested? Is ...


Requirements Quick Notes, William L. Honig, Shingo Takada Mar 2016

Requirements Quick Notes, William L. Honig, Shingo Takada

Computer Science: Faculty Publications and Other Works

A short introduction to requirements and their role in system development. Includes industry definition of requirements, overview of basic requirements process including numbering of requirements, ties to testing, and traceability. An introduction to requirements quality attributes (correct, unambiguous, etc.) Includes references to requirements process, numbering, and quality papers.