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Computer Engineering Commons

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Digital Communications and Networking

California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

GPS

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Computer Engineering

Pinpoint: Location Beacon And Tracking, Ezequiel Lopez Iii Jun 2016

Pinpoint: Location Beacon And Tracking, Ezequiel Lopez Iii

Computer Engineering

The purpose of Pinpoint was to create a device that can collect and transmit location information for multiple users on a wireless network. The device would be used to keep track of and communicate with other users nearby. The final design includes a touchscreen display as a graphical user interface (GUI), an XBee RF module for wireless networking, a GPS receiver for location tracking, and a Programmable System on a Chip (PSoC) to control the modules.


Motohud: Intelligent And Safe Navigational Data Presentation For Motorcyclists, Drew Bentz, William Budney Jun 2013

Motohud: Intelligent And Safe Navigational Data Presentation For Motorcyclists, Drew Bentz, William Budney

Computer Engineering

The system uses a GPS (Global Positioning System) sensor, Bluetooth modem, and OLED (organic light-emitting diode) screen to display navigational information to a motorcycle rider. Currently supported navigational information are speed and heading, with a framework in place for future turn-by-turn navigation. The system is powered by a lithium-ion battery pack and controlled by an Arduino Micro. For turn-by-turn navigation, an Android powered smartphone running our Android App is required. Our system aims to reduce safety hazards from having to tilt or move one’s head when trying to view speed on a motorcycle speedometer, which is usually mounted down ...


General Direction Routing Protocol, Sean Michael Lydon Jun 2009

General Direction Routing Protocol, Sean Michael Lydon

Master's Theses and Project Reports

The General Direction Routing Protocol (GDRP) is a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN)

multi-path routing protocol which abstracts localization information (commonly GPS

coordinates) into relative direction information in order to perform routing decisions. By

generating relative direction information GDRP is able to operate with fewer precision

requirements than other protocols. This abstraction also allows the integration of other emerging

hardware-based localization techniques, for example, Beamforming Sensor Arrays.

GDRP does not specifically address the next hop a packet should take, but instead specifies a

direction it should travel. This direction abstraction allows for multiple paths to be taken through

the network thus ...