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Full-Text Articles in Computer Engineering

Reifying Communication At The Application Level, Andrew P. Black, Jie Huang, Jonathan Walpole Oct 2001

Reifying Communication At The Application Level, Andrew P. Black, Jie Huang, Jonathan Walpole

Computer Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

Middleware, from the earliest RPC systems to recent Object-Oriented Remote Message Sending (RMS) systems such as Java RMI and CORBA, claims transparency as one of its main attributes. Coulouris et al. define transparency as “the concealment from the … application programmer of the separation of components in a distributed system.” They go on to identify eight different kinds of transparency.

We considered titling this paper “Transparency Considered Harmful”, but that title is misleading because it implies that all kinds of transparency are bad. This is not our view. Rather, we believe that the choice of which transparencies should be offered by ...


Infopipes—An Abstraction For Information Flow, Jie Huang, Andrew P. Black, Jonathan Walpole, Calton Pu Jun 2001

Infopipes—An Abstraction For Information Flow, Jie Huang, Andrew P. Black, Jonathan Walpole, Calton Pu

Computer Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

Building Object-Oriented Distributed Systems has been facilitated by Remote Message Sending (RMS) systems like Java RMI and implementations of CORBA. However, RMS systems are designed to support request/response interactions. Streaming applications, in contrast, are characterized by high-bandwidth, long-duration communication with stringent performance requirements. Examples of streaming applications include video-on-demand, teleconferencing, on-line education, and environmental observation. These applications transfer huge amounts of data and focus on distributed information flow rather than request/response.

To simplify the task of building distributed streaming applications, we propose a new abstraction for information flow—Infopipes. Using Infopipes, information flow becomes the heart of the ...


Modeling The Transient Rate Behavior Of Bandwidth Sharing As A Hybrid Control System, Kang Li, Molly H. Shor, Jonathan Walpole, Calton Pu Mar 2001

Modeling The Transient Rate Behavior Of Bandwidth Sharing As A Hybrid Control System, Kang Li, Molly H. Shor, Jonathan Walpole, Calton Pu

Computer Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

This paper uses hybrid control to model a problem of computer network systems, the dynamic behavior of bandwidth sharing among competing TCP traffic. It has been well known in the computer network community that well-behaved (TCP-friendly) congestion control mechanisms are crucial to the robustness of the Internet. Congestion control determines the transmission rate for each flow. Right now, most TCP-friendly research focuses only on the average throughput behavior without considering how the data is sent out in the short-term (e.g. bursty or smooth). However, recent experimental results show that short-term rate adjustments can change the bandwidth sharing result. Therefore ...


Infosphere Project: An Overview, Calton Pu, Jonathan Walpole Mar 2001

Infosphere Project: An Overview, Calton Pu, Jonathan Walpole

Computer Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

We describe the Infosphere project, which is building the systems software support for information-driven applications such as digital libraries and electronic commerce. The main technical contribution is the Infopipe abstraction to support information flow with quality of service. Using building blocks such as program specialization, software feedback, domain-specific languages, and personalized information filtering, the Infopipe software generates code and manage resources to provide the specified quality of service with support for composition and restructuring.


Moving Towards Massively Scalable Video-Based Sensor Networks, Wu-Chi Feng, Jonathan Walpole, Calton Pu, Wu-Chang Feng Mar 2001

Moving Towards Massively Scalable Video-Based Sensor Networks, Wu-Chi Feng, Jonathan Walpole, Calton Pu, Wu-Chang Feng

Computer Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

Networking and computing technologies are becoming advanced enough to enable a wealth of diverse applications that will drastically change our everyday lives. Some past examples of these developments include the World Wide Web and wireless data networking infrastructures. As is quite obvious, the World Wide Web has enabled a fundamental change in the way many people deal with day-to-day tasks. Through the web, one can now make on-line reservations for travel, pay bills through on-line banking services, and view personalized on-line newscasts. More recently, developments in wireless technologies have enabled anywhere, anytime access to information over wireless medium. As wireless ...


Towards Comparative Profiling Of Parallel Applications With Pperfdb, Christian Leland Hansen Jan 2001

Towards Comparative Profiling Of Parallel Applications With Pperfdb, Christian Leland Hansen

Dissertations and Theses

Due to the complex nature of parallel programming, it is difficult to diagnose and solve performance related problems. Knowledge of program behavior is obtained experimentally, with repeated runs of a slightly modified version of the application or the same code in different environments. In these circumstances, comparative performance analysis can provide meaningful insights into the subtle effects of system and code changes on parallel program behavior by highlighting the difference in performance results across executions.

I have designed and implemented modules which extend the PPerfDB performance tool to allow access to existing performance data generated by several commonly used tracing ...


Rate-Matching Packet Scheduler For Real-Rate Applications, Kang Li, Jonathan Walpole, Dylan Mcnamee, Calton Pu, David Steere Jan 2001

Rate-Matching Packet Scheduler For Real-Rate Applications, Kang Li, Jonathan Walpole, Dylan Mcnamee, Calton Pu, David Steere

Computer Science Faculty Publications and Presentations

A packet scheduler is an operating system component that controls the allocation of network interface bandwidth to outgoing network flows. By deciding which packet to send next, packet schedulers not only determine how bandwidth is shared among flows, but also play a key role in determining the rate and timing behavior of individual flows. The recent explosion of rate and timing-sensitive flows, particularly in the context of multimedia applications, has focused new interest on packet schedulers. Next generation packet schedulers must not only ensure separation among flows and meet real-time performance constraints, they must also support dynamic fine-grain reallocation of ...