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Full-Text Articles in Computer Engineering

Ceg 433/633-01: Operating Systems, Thomas Wischgoll Oct 2009

Ceg 433/633-01: Operating Systems, Thomas Wischgoll

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

By the end of this quarter, you should be able to apply the learned concepts to the following:
•Develop, test and debug programs in Unix.
•Improve the performance of programs by tuning virtual memory usage, and file io.
•Design and construct device drivers for Unix.
•Design and build newer file systems for any OS.

During the course we will discuss topics from the following areas:
•Operating system structures
•Operating system interfaces
•Process management and scheduling
•Interprocess communication
•File systems
•Memory management


Cs 415: Social Implications Of Computing, Leo Finkelstein Oct 2009

Cs 415: Social Implications Of Computing, Leo Finkelstein

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

CS 415 is a communication skills course using as its subject matter current salient issues associated with the social implications of computing. In addition to the course text, you will need to use certain reading materials in the library and elsewhere, and you will be responsible for using concepts and theories provided in class lectures and discussions.


Ceg 702-01: Advanced Computer Networks, Yong Pei Oct 2009

Ceg 702-01: Advanced Computer Networks, Yong Pei

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course provides an in-depth examination of the fundamental concepts and principles in communications and computer networks. Topics include: queuing analysis, ATM, frame relay, performance analysis of routings, and flow and congestion controls.


Ceg 730-01: Distributed Computing Principles, Prabhaker Mateti Oct 2009

Ceg 730-01: Distributed Computing Principles, Prabhaker Mateti

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

[4 Credit Hours] Communicating sequential processes, clients and servers, remote procedure calls, stub generation, weak and strong semaphores, split-binary-semaphores, and distributed termination. Example languages: SR, Linda. Prerequisite: CEG 633


Ceg 360/560-01: Digital System Design, Travis E. Doom Oct 2009

Ceg 360/560-01: Digital System Design, Travis E. Doom

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

Design of digital systems. Topics include flip-flops, registers, counters, programmable logic devices, memory devices, register-level design, and microcomputer system organization. Students must show competency in the design of digital systems. 3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab. Prerequisite: CEG260.


Ceg 760-01: Advanced Software Computer Engineering, Thomas C. Hartrum Oct 2009

Ceg 760-01: Advanced Software Computer Engineering, Thomas C. Hartrum

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course covers advanced topics in software engineering. Aspects of problem specification, design, verification, and evaluation are discussed. We will focus on design methods, including software patterns and software architecture, plus some advanced topics involving formal methods of software specification or evaluation using software metrics. Students will participate in team projects to apply the methods discussed.


Ceg 498-01: Design Experience, Thomas C. Hartrum Oct 2009

Ceg 498-01: Design Experience, Thomas C. Hartrum

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

CEG 498 (Design Experience) is a summative computer engineering design project course that builds upon previous engineering, science, mathematics and communications course work. CEG 498 projects are a minimum of two quarters in length and must be completed in groups of at least three students. Projects are selected under the guidance of the course instructor and are tailored to both student interest and formal classroom preparation. Students are evaluated both on their individual contributions as recorded in a graded engineering journal and on the quality of their collective efforts as reflected in group generated products.


Ceg 434/634-01: Concurrent Software Design, Douglas J. Kelly Oct 2009

Ceg 434/634-01: Concurrent Software Design, Douglas J. Kelly

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course provides an introduction to concurrent program design in the UNIX environment. Classical problems of synchronization, concurrency, and their solutions are examined through course projects, homework, and readings on operating system design.


Ceg 221-01: Introduction To C Programming For Engineers, Jay Dejongh Oct 2009

Ceg 221-01: Introduction To C Programming For Engineers, Jay Dejongh

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course introduces advanced constructs, algorithms, and data structures in the C programming language. Emphasis is on problem solving and techniques useful to engineers. Topics include functions, array, pointers, structures as well as sorting algorithms, linked lists, complex numbers, and numerical methods applications. 4 credit hours. Prerequisite: CEG220 (Introduction to C Programming for Engineers).


Ceg 724-01: Computer Vision I, Arthur A. Goshtasby Oct 2009

Ceg 724-01: Computer Vision I, Arthur A. Goshtasby

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course covers basic a]algorithms for low-level and mid-level vision. The algorithms deal with reducing image noise and segment images into objects or their parts. Other a]algorithms covered in the course analyze and quantify texture, register images, and recover 3-D shapes from 2-D images.


Ceg 320/520-01: Computer Organization, Michael L. Raymer Oct 2009

Ceg 320/520-01: Computer Organization, Michael L. Raymer

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

No abstract provided.


Ceg 770-01: Computer Engineering Mathematics, Yong Pei Oct 2009

Ceg 770-01: Computer Engineering Mathematics, Yong Pei

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

Computer Engineering and Science students need proficiency in relevant applied mathematics to be able to discover and model difficult real-world computer engineering and science problems. The relationship of these problems to mathematical theory will be discussed. This course provides an introduction to linear and nonlinear programming, probability and stochastic process, and queueing theory. In addition to mathematical theory, appropriate applications will be presented.


Ceg 402/602-01: Introduction To Computer Communication, Jianing Ma Oct 2009

Ceg 402/602-01: Introduction To Computer Communication, Jianing Ma

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course provides an introduction to basic concepts of communication
networks, different types of networks, protocols over different layers, and network
applications through lectures, labs, homework, and reading on relevant materials. You will
•Understand networking principles, protocols, and technologies.
•Understand some design and performance issues involved in providing a
network service.
•Acquire background for supporting e-commerce, e-government, and e-education.
•Gain hands-on experience with programming techniques for network
protocols.
•Obtain background for original research in computer networks.


Ceg 720-01: Computer Architecture I, Soon M. Chung Oct 2009

Ceg 720-01: Computer Architecture I, Soon M. Chung

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

Review of sequential computer architecture and study of parallel computers. Topics include memory hierarchy, reduced instruction set computer, pipeline processing, multiprocessing, various parallel computers, interconnection networks, and fault-tolerant computing.


Ceg 453/653: Embedded Systems, Jack Jean Oct 2009

Ceg 453/653: Embedded Systems, Jack Jean

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

No abstract provided.


Ceg 460/660-01: Introduction To Software Computer Engineering, Thomas C. Hartrum Oct 2009

Ceg 460/660-01: Introduction To Software Computer Engineering, Thomas C. Hartrum

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course is concerned with the techniques of designing and constructing large programs. Some of the required basic concepts necessarily have to be developed using small programs as examples. To this extent, we also study programming-in-the-small. The overall objectives are to present an overview of issues in the development of software, to discuss terminology, to illustrate via example case studies, and to give sufficiently detailed advice on how to develop quality software. Hands-on experience is emphasized through the use of homework and a class project.


Ceg 476/676-01: Computer Graphics I, Thomas Wischgoll Oct 2009

Ceg 476/676-01: Computer Graphics I, Thomas Wischgoll

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

By the end of this quarter, you will have learnt techniques for constructing 2-D and 3-D objects as well as manipulating and rendering the objects using OpenGL.


Ceg 260-01: Digital Computer Hardware/Switching Circuits, Meilin Liu Oct 2009

Ceg 260-01: Digital Computer Hardware/Switching Circuits, Meilin Liu

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

We will discuss and cover basic digital, combinational and sequential logic systems. Labs will be used to gain valuable practical experience in implementing elementary circuits and logic designs.


Cs 209: Computer Programming For Business Ii, Dennis Kellermeier Oct 2009

Cs 209: Computer Programming For Business Ii, Dennis Kellermeier

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

CS 209 is the second of a two quarter sequence in programming for business students. It is required for Management Information Science majors. The courses are designed to help students achieve a high degree of facility in intermediate level programming.


Cs 302-01: Introduction To Oracle Sql Databases, Karen Meyer Oct 2009

Cs 302-01: Introduction To Oracle Sql Databases, Karen Meyer

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

No abstract provided.


Cs 214: Visual Basic Programming, Vanessa Starkey Oct 2009

Cs 214: Visual Basic Programming, Vanessa Starkey

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course will cover the fundamentals of object-oriented computer
programming including design, structure, debugging, and testing. Visual Basic 2008 will be used for
developing programs.


Cs 409/609: Principles Of Artificial Intelligence, Shaojun Wang Oct 2009

Cs 409/609: Principles Of Artificial Intelligence, Shaojun Wang

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

No abstract provided.


Cs 400-01: Data Structures And Algorithms, Sarah Gothard Oct 2009

Cs 400-01: Data Structures And Algorithms, Sarah Gothard

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

No abstract provided.


Cs 240: Computer Programming I, Sarah Gothard Oct 2009

Cs 240: Computer Programming I, Sarah Gothard

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

Basic concepts of programming and programming languages are introduced.
Emphasis is on structured programming and stepwise refinement.


Cs 405/605-02: Introduction To Database Management Systems, Keke Chen Oct 2009

Cs 405/605-02: Introduction To Database Management Systems, Keke Chen

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course will cover the following topics: (1) Logical and physical aspects of database management systems (2) Data models including entity-relationship (ER) and relational models (3) Physical implementation (data organization and indexing) methods. (4) Query languages including SQL, relational algebra, and relational calculus. Students will gain experience in creating and manipulating a database, and gain knowledge on professional and ethical responsibility and on the importance of privacy/security of data.


Cs 475/675: Web Information Systems, Amit P. Sheth Oct 2009

Cs 475/675: Web Information Systems, Amit P. Sheth

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course covers advanced topics in managing W eh-based resources, with a focus on building applications involving heterogeneous data. It will expose students to the following concept, topics, architectures, techniques, and technologies:

• data, metadata, information, knowledge, and ontologies
• unstructured, semi-structured, structured, multimodal, multimedia, and sensor data syntax,
structural/representational, and semantic aspects of data
• architectures: federated databases, mediator, information brokering
• integration and analysis of Web-based information
• automatic information/metadata extraction (entity identification/recognition, disambiguation)
• Web search engines, social networks, Web 2.0
• Semantic Web and Web 3.0
• relevant Web standards and technologies
• real-world examples that have major research projects ...


Cs 208: Computer Programming For Business I, David M. Hutchison Oct 2009

Cs 208: Computer Programming For Business I, David M. Hutchison

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

CS 208 is the first In a sequence of two programming classes required for MIS majors. This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of programming. Examples are from business applications and display graphics and emphasis is on problem solving with the computer as a tool.


Cs 499/699: Cloud Computing, Keke Chen Oct 2009

Cs 499/699: Cloud Computing, Keke Chen

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

In this course, we will explore a few aspects of cloud computing: distributed data crunching with MapReduce, cloud and datacenter filesystems, virtualization, security&privacy, Amazon Web Services, and interactive web-based applications. Students are expected to finish a few mini projects, read some papers, and take the final exam. Participation in the class discussion is strongly encouraged. Guest speakers might be invited for some particular topics. (3 Hours Lecture+ 1 Hour lab).


Cs 410/610: Theoretical Foundations Of Computing, Thomas Sudkamp Oct 2009

Cs 410/610: Theoretical Foundations Of Computing, Thomas Sudkamp

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course is an introduction to one of the fundamental topics in the theory of computer science: computability theory. Computability theory is concerned with determining whether there is an algorithmic solution to a problem. The study of computability uses the Turing machine as the basic computational model. A Turing machine is a random access, read-write, finite state automaton. Although the Turing machine provides a simple computational framework, the Church-Turing thesis asserts that any problem that can be solved in any algorithmic manner can be solved by a Turing machine.


Cs 141: Computer Programming - I, Michael Ondrasek Oct 2009

Cs 141: Computer Programming - I, Michael Ondrasek

Computer Science & Engineering Syllabi

This course provides a general introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming. Examples from and applications to a broad range of problems are given. No prior knowledge of programming is assumed. The concepts covered will be applied to the Java programming language. Students must register for both lecture and one laboratory section. 4 credit hours. Prerequisite: MTH 127 (College Algebra) or equivalent.