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Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Synthesis And Characterization Of Nucleic Acid-Functionalized Nanomaterials, Brianna S. Carroll, Jong Hyun Choi Oct 2013

Synthesis And Characterization Of Nucleic Acid-Functionalized Nanomaterials, Brianna S. Carroll, Jong Hyun Choi

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Motor proteins such as kinesin move along microtubules in order to transport cellular cargos throughout the cell by obtaining energy from RNA hydrolysis which allows the cell to complete the tasks needed to stay alive. In this work, we developed synthetic molecular motors using DNA enzymes (DNAzyme) and fluorescent nanomaterials which mimic the functions and structures of motor proteins. A DNAzyme-capped CdS nanoparticle and a RNA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) were used as a walker and a track in the motor platform, respectively. As a walking mechanism, the DNAzyme cleaved the RNA substrates in the presence of metal cations. The ...


Inkjet Printing Of Polarized Yeast Cells, Xiuyuan Yang, Kari Clase Oct 2013

Inkjet Printing Of Polarized Yeast Cells, Xiuyuan Yang, Kari Clase

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

The motivation is to applying engineering knowledge to develop 3D bio-printing in inkjet printer (first stage--monolayer). To achieve the goal, there are three problems to solve. First, we have to figure out regulation of growth of target cells; inability to regulate the location and pattern of growing cells make us even unable to build 3D printer in the direct way. Second problem is how to protect of yeast cells from high temperature and viscous force when printing. The third issue is how to modify the inkjet printer especially the feeding system in order to implement printing on other materials rather ...


Adhesive Elastomeric Proteins, Haefa Mansour, Julie Liu Oct 2013

Adhesive Elastomeric Proteins, Haefa Mansour, Julie Liu

The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Symposium

Sutures and staples commonly used to close surgical wounds tend to be much stiffer than the surrounding tissue, often resulting in external tissue damage. Surgical adhesives provide a promising alternative to these sutures and staples. Ideal surgical adhesives are biocompatible, able to set well and remain sticky in moist conditions, possess strong adhesive and cohesive properties, and exhibit mechanical properties that mimic those of the surrounding tissue. Unfortunately, the adhesives available today are unable to satisfactorily meet all of these criteria. We are utilizing protein engineering techniques to design, create, and test a new surgical adhesive that combines the adhesive ...