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Full-Text Articles in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Dynamic Balance Control During Treadmill Walking In Chronic Stroke Survivors, Eric Richard Walker Oct 2013

Dynamic Balance Control During Treadmill Walking In Chronic Stroke Survivors, Eric Richard Walker

Dissertations (1934 -)

Maintaining dynamic balance is an important component of walking function that is likely impaired in chronic stroke survivors, evidenced by an increased prevalence of falls. Dynamic balance control requires maintaining the center of mass (COM) within the base of support during movement. During walking, dynamic balance control is achieved largely by modifying foot placement to adjust the base of support. However, chronic stroke survivors have difficulty with both precision control of foot placement, as well as reduced control of COM movement. The objective of this dissertation was to characterize dynamic balance control strategies during walking in chronic stroke survivors. Additionally ...


Effect Of Tilt Sensor Versus Heel Loading On Neuroprosthesis Stimulation Reliability And Timing For Individuals Post-Stroke During Level And Non- Level Treadmill Walking, M. Barbara Silver-Thorn Oct 2013

Effect Of Tilt Sensor Versus Heel Loading On Neuroprosthesis Stimulation Reliability And Timing For Individuals Post-Stroke During Level And Non- Level Treadmill Walking, M. Barbara Silver-Thorn

Biomedical Engineering Faculty Research and Publications

Study background: Non-level walking may adversely affect stimulation of neuroprostheses as initial programming is performed during level walking. The objectives of this study were to assess stimulation reliability of tilt and heel sensor-based neuroprosthesis stimulation during level and non-level walking, examine stimulation initiation and termination timing during level and non-level walking, and determine whether heel or tilt sensor-based stimulation control is more robust for non-level ambulation. Methods: Eight post-stroke individuals with drop foot who were able to actively ambulate within the community were selected for participation. Each subject acclimated to the neuroprosthesis and walked on a treadmill randomly positioned in ...