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Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Characterization Of Xylan Utilization And Discovery Of A New Endoxylanase In Thermoanaerobacterium Saccharolyticum Through Targeted Gene Deletions, Kara K. Podkaminer, Adam M. Guss, Heather L. Trajano, David A. Hogsett, Lee R. Lynd Sep 2012

Characterization Of Xylan Utilization And Discovery Of A New Endoxylanase In Thermoanaerobacterium Saccharolyticum Through Targeted Gene Deletions, Kara K. Podkaminer, Adam M. Guss, Heather L. Trajano, David A. Hogsett, Lee R. Lynd

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

The economical production of fuels and commodity chemicals from lignocellulose requires the utilization of both the cellulose and hemicellulose fractions. Xylanase enzymes allow greater utilization of hemicellulose while also increasing cellulose hydrolysis. Recent metabolic engineering efforts have resulted in a strain of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum that can convert C5 and C6 sugars, as well as insoluble xylan, into ethanol at high yield. To better understand the process of xylan solubilization in this organism, a series of targeted deletions were constructed in the homoethanologenic T. saccharolyticum strain M0355 to characterize xylan hydrolysis and xylose utilization in this organism. While the deletion of ...


Mixed-Surface, Lipid-Tethered Quantum Dots For Targeting Cells And Tissues, Yanjie Zhang, Amanda Haage, Elizabeth M. Whitley, Ian C. Schneider, Aaron R. Clapp Jun 2012

Mixed-Surface, Lipid-Tethered Quantum Dots For Targeting Cells And Tissues, Yanjie Zhang, Amanda Haage, Elizabeth M. Whitley, Ian C. Schneider, Aaron R. Clapp

Chemical and Biological Engineering Publications

Quantum dots (QDs), with their variable luminescent properties, are rapidly transcending traditional labeling techniques in biological imaging and hold vast potential for biosensing applications. An obstacle in any biosensor development is targeted specificity. Here we report a facile procedure for creating QDs targeted to the cell membrane with the goal of cell-surface protease biosensing. This procedure generates water-soluble QDs with variable coverage of lipid functional groups. The resulting hydrophobicity is quantitatively controlled by the molar ratio of lipids per QD. Appropriate tuning of the hydrophobicity ensures solubility in common aqueous cell culture media and while providing affinity to the lipid ...


Computational Design And Characterization Of A Temperature-Sensitive Plasmid Replicon For Gram Positive Thermophiles, Daniel G. Olson, Lee R. Lynd May 2012

Computational Design And Characterization Of A Temperature-Sensitive Plasmid Replicon For Gram Positive Thermophiles, Daniel G. Olson, Lee R. Lynd

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

Temperature-sensitive (Ts) plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to ...


Living In An Age Of Technology: College Students' Perception Of The Role Of Genetic Engineering And Reproductive Technology In Today's Society, Kayla Quadros Apr 2012

Living In An Age Of Technology: College Students' Perception Of The Role Of Genetic Engineering And Reproductive Technology In Today's Society, Kayla Quadros

Honors Projects Overview

This study examines attitudes about prevalent issues in genetics and reproduction among the college population. Eighteen interviews were conducted with students at Rhode Island College. Respondents were asked questions about their moral standpoints concerning utilizing genetic engineering for disease control and aesthetic purposes, employing assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), regulation of such procedures, and also about media sources for which they have heard of these topics. Findings suggest that, generally, participants felt that genetic engineering for health issues is permissible, yet reprehensible for the purpose of aesthetically "designing" a baby, though four students (three of which were female) found the enhancement ...