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Full-Text Articles in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

Real-Time Single-Molecule Observations Of Proteins At The Solid-Liquid Interface, Blake Brianna Langdon Jan 2014

Real-Time Single-Molecule Observations Of Proteins At The Solid-Liquid Interface, Blake Brianna Langdon

Chemical & Biological Engineering Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Non-specific protein adsorption to solid surfaces is pervasive and observed across a broad spectrum of applications including biomaterials, separations, pharmaceuticals, and biosensing. Despite great interest in and considerable literature dedicated to the phenomena, a mechanistic understanding of this complex phenomena is lacking and remains controversial, partially due to the limits of ensemble-averaging techniques used to study it. Single-molecule tracking (SMT) methods allow us to study distinct protein dynamics (e.g. adsorption, desorption, diffusion, and intermolecular associations) on a molecule-by-molecule basis revealing the protein population and spatial heterogeneity inherent in protein interfacial behavior. By employing single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy ...


A Novel Selection Technology For The Discovery Of High-Affinity Human Proteins, David Busha Jan 2014

A Novel Selection Technology For The Discovery Of High-Affinity Human Proteins, David Busha

Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Proteins that bind with high-affinity to cellular targets can be useful therapeutic treatments. High-throughput affinity screening of large protein libraries is often more successful at discovering novel high-affinity proteins than rational-design approaches. Display techniques such and phage and yeast display are commonly used in this screening process. However, bacteria and yeast cells can misfold or otherwise inappropriately express mammalian and human proteins due to differences in codon usage, protein folding machinery and post-translational modifications. Therefore, a display system that is entirely based in human cells could aid in the discovery of novel, high-affinity proteins. No such system has been described ...