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Virginia Commonwealth University

Haptics

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Full-Text Articles in Biomedical Engineering and Bioengineering

The Effect Of Vibrotactile Feedback On Remote Manual Task Performance, Matthew S. Standard Jan 2017

The Effect Of Vibrotactile Feedback On Remote Manual Task Performance, Matthew S. Standard

Theses and Dissertations

Vibrotactile feedback offers a unique opportunity to augment or reconstruct impaired tactile sensations, whether that be in the form of enhancing prosthetics or specialized protective clothing. Important information about temperature and object slippage serve to endanger the human operator or equipment. This thesis presents three experiments which investigate amplitude modulated vibrotactile signals as a scalar dimension of roughness, the effect those signals and their locations (finger pad, forearm, bicep) have on the performance of two tasks: the sensing of temperatures simulated by vibrotactile signals and gripping an object of simulated surface texture. The results show task performance increase when the ...


A Study Towards Development Of An Automated Haptic User Interface (Ahui) For Individuals Who Are Blind Or Visually Impaired, Ravi Rastogi Aug 2012

A Study Towards Development Of An Automated Haptic User Interface (Ahui) For Individuals Who Are Blind Or Visually Impaired, Ravi Rastogi

Theses and Dissertations

An increasing amount of information content used in schools, work and everyday living is being presented in graphical form, creating accessibility challenges for individuals who are blind or visually impaired, especially in dynamic environments, such as over the internet. Refreshable haptic displays that can interact with computers can be used to access such information tactually. Main focus of this study was the development of specialized computer applications allowing users to actively compensate for the inherent issues of haptics when exploring visual diagrams as compared to vision, which we hypothesized, would improve the usability of such devices. An intuitive zooming algorithm ...


Development Of A Multiple Contact Haptic Display With Texture-Enhanced Graphics, David Burch May 2012

Development Of A Multiple Contact Haptic Display With Texture-Enhanced Graphics, David Burch

Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation presents work towards the development of a multiple finger, worn, dynamic display device, which utilizes a method of texture encoded information to haptically render graphical images for individuals who are blind or visually impaired. The device interacts directly with the computer screen, using the colors and patterns displayed by the image as a means to encode complex patterns of vibrotactile output, generating the texture feedback to render the image. In turn, the texture feedback was methodically designed to enable parallel processing of certain coarse information, speeding up the exploration of the diagram and improving user performance. The design ...


Position Concordant - Haptic Mouse, Ravi Rastogi Feb 2009

Position Concordant - Haptic Mouse, Ravi Rastogi

Theses and Dissertations

Haptic mice, computer mice modified to have a tactile display, have been developed to enable access to computer graphics by individuals who are blind or visually impaired. Although these haptic mice are potentially very helpful and have been frequently used by the research community, there are some fundamental problems with the mouse, limiting its acceptance. In this paper we have identified the problems and have suggested solutions using one haptic mouse, the VT Player. We found that our modified VT Player showed significant improvement both in terms of the odds of obtaining a correct responses and the time to perform ...


Development Of An Inexpensive, Haptic Graphical Display Device, David Burch Dec 2008

Development Of An Inexpensive, Haptic Graphical Display Device, David Burch

Theses and Dissertations

A finger-worn haptic device capable of rendering 2-D graphics through vibrotactile feedback is presented. The device development is presented from its initial stages of being a stylus design using a photo-interrupter optical sensor and pager-motor actuator to a small case worn on the finger using a RGB color sensor and a piezoelectric actuator. Testing of the latest prototype design shows that it has a spatial sensitivity (<2mm) comparable to natural touch (~1mm) and can be used to output a variety of vibrotactile textures. The design can be expanded for a multiple finger, independent device, while remaining affordable (<$100) and highly portable (<500g).